Health News

India's drug stores plan protest against e-pharmacies

People walk past a chemist shop at a market in MumbaiBy Aditya Kalra and Zeba Siddiqui NEW DELHI/MUMBAI (Reuters) - As many as 850,000 small chemist shops in India will shut for a day next week to protest against a burgeoning online pharmacy industry that is attracting big money backers. Healthcare provider Apollo Hospitals Enterprise Ltd plans to start online drug sales in India, while Zigy, and Sequoia Capital-backed 1mg already have e-pharmacies to tap a retail market IMS Health says is worth about $13 billion. Varun Gupta, head of medical affairs at 1mg said the company gets up to 60 million hits a month on its website and its mobile app has been downloaded 3.5 million times since 2012.

AstraZeneca pauses two lung cancer drug combination trials

A sign is seen at an AstraZeneca site in MacclesfieldAstraZeneca has temporarily halted two clinical trials combining experimental drugs to treat lung cancer, following reports of lung disease in some patients, the company said on Friday. The trials involve giving its drug AZD9291, which is currently awaiting regulatory approval, alongside the immune system-boosting medicine durvalumab, also known as MEDI4736, to treat patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. AZD9291 and durvalumab are two of AstraZeneca's most promising experimental cancer treatments, although their use together in lung disease is only one of many possible applications.

Ebola's persistence in survivors fuels concerns over future risks

The blood of a survivor of Ebola virus is extracted as part of a study launched at Liberia's John F. Kennedy Hospital in MonroviaA growing awareness of how the Ebola virus can hide in parts of the body such as eyes, breasts and testicles long after leaving the bloodstream raises questions about whether the disease can ever be beaten. Virologists said Friday's case of a Scottish nurse, Pauline Cafferkey, who had recovered from Ebola but is now suffering complications adds to signs that the virus is a long-term health risk and can lead to a "post-Ebola syndrome". "Over the past few years there has been mounting evidence of mental and physical health problems in Ebola survivors that can last for years after the virus is cleared from the bloodstream," said Ben Neuman, an Ebola expert and lecturer in virology at Britain's University of Reading.

Discharged British Ebola nurse back in hospital

An Ebola patient is put on a Hercules transport plane at Glasgow Airport in ScotlandA Scottish nurse who contracted the Ebola virus in Sierra Leone last year but had seemingly made a full recovery was back in hospital in a serious condition on Friday after suffering a late complication from the disease. Pauline Cafferkey, 39, was transferred from the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow to an isolation unit at the Royal Free Hospital in London early on Friday morning, the Royal Free said in a statement. "Pauline Cafferkey is in a serious condition," the hospital said, adding that she was suffering from "an unusual late complication".

Johnson & Johnson starts Ebola vaccine trial in Sierra Leone

FILE - In this Aug. 12, 2015 photo, people walk past a billboard warning residents to stop the stigmatization of Ebola survivors, in Kenema, eastern Sierra Leone. Johnson & Johnson has begun clinical trials for an Ebola vaccine in Sierra Leone. The vaccine regimen is part of a new study being conducted in Sierra Leone's Kambia district, where some of the country's most recent Ebola cases have been reported. The company said Friday, Oct. 9, that the first volunteers have received the initial dose. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. (AP) — Johnson & Johnson has begun clinical trials for an Ebola vaccine in Sierra Leone.

J&J starts vaccine trial in Sierra Leone, even as Ebola fades

Volunteer Andrew Matzen receives a trial Ebola vaccine at the Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine in OxfordJohnson & Johnson has begun a clinical trial of a two-shot Ebola vaccine in Sierra Leone, underlining its determination to push ahead with development, even as the epidemic fades out in West Africa. The new study will investigate the experimental product's safety and its ability to provoke an immune response to the disease, which the World Health Organization says has killed more than 11,000 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Last week, for the first time since the Ebola outbreak was declared in March 2014, there were no new confirmed cases of the deadly disease in those countries, according to the U.N. agency.

Next Biometrics soars as Swedish investors buys big stake

OSLO/STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Norwegian fingerprint sensor maker Next Biometrics said it would raise 120 million Norwegian crowns ($14.78 million) from Greenbridge Partners, a firm founded by Swedish investors Melker Schorling and Ola Rollen, sending shares soaring. "Greenbridge Partners Ltd has undertaken a thorough process before making the investment decision," Next said in a statement on Friday. Shares of the Norwegian firm shot up 64 percent at 0417 EDT.

Studies say 1/3 of young men in China to die from smoking

A man smokes near a portrait of late Chinese leader Mao Zedong hung on a replica of the Tiananmen Gate in Yinchuan in northwestern China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region on Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015. Research published in the medical journal The Lancet says one in three of all the young men in China are likely to die from tobacco, but that the number can fall if the men quit smoking. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)BEIJING (AP) — Research published in the medical journal The Lancet says one in three of all the young men in China are likely to die from tobacco, but that the number can fall if the men quit smoking.

Ten quarantined in Nigeria over Ebola scare

Health workers put on protective gear before entering a quarantine zone at a Red Cross facility in the town of KoiduA patient came to the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital on Wednesday with symptoms consistent with the viral hemorrhagic fever, staff there said. "We have sent blood samples for testing and quarantined identified contacts," the hospital's chief medical director, Queeneth Kalu, said. Nigeria's National Emergency Management Agency said 10 people were in quarantine.

Singapore screens hundreds after hepatitis C outbreak

The state-run Singapore General Hospital said 678 patients as well as 273 medical workers were being contacted to be screened for the virusA hepatitis C scare linked to four deaths so far in Singapore widened Friday after its largest hospital said nearly 1,000 patients and health staff need to be screened for the virus. The state-run Singapore General Hospital said 678 patients as well as 273 medical workers were being contacted to be screened for the virus, local media reported, double the number initially estimated to be affected. The hospital earlier said 22 kidney patients had been infected with hepatitis C between April and June.

Countries at heart of Ebola outbreak see first virus-free week

Children come forward to get their feet disinfected after a Red Cross worker explained that they are spraying bleach, and not spraying the village with the Ebola virus, in ForecariahThe three West African countries at the heart of an Ebola epidemic recorded their first week with no new cases since the outbreak was declared in March 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Wednesday. The U.N. agency said that more than 11,000 people have died in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone in the world's worst known occurrence of Ebola, but there were no new cases in the week to Oct. 4. "Over 500 contacts remain under follow-up in Guinea, and several high-risk contacts associated with active and recently active chains of transmission in Guinea and Sierra Leone have been lost to follow-up," it said in its situation report.

Gene editing: Research spurs debate over promise vs. ethics

WASHINGTON (AP) — The hottest tool in biology has scientists using words like revolutionary as they describe the long-term potential: wiping out certain mosquitoes that carry malaria, treating genetic diseases like sickle-cell, preventing babies from inheriting a life-threatening disorder.

Nigerian at center of Ebola scare did not have the virus: WHO

A person who died in a suspected case of Ebola in Nigeria, triggering a scare and the quarantine of 10 others, did not have the deadly virus, World Health Organization spokesman Gregory Hartl said by email on Friday. "(The) dead person tested negative for Ebola. A laboratory investigation showed the dead person did not have Ebola or Lassa fever, Hartl said.

British nurse who contracted Ebola hospitalized again

FILE - In this Saturday, Jan. 1, 2015 file photo, Pauline Cafferkey, a nurse who contracted Ebola while working in Sierra Leone, smiles in the Royal Free Hospital in London. London’s Royal Free Hospital says a nurse who recovered from Ebola last year is being treated for an unusual late complication of the infection. A military aircraft flew Pauline Cafferkey from her home in Scotland to London early Friday, Oct. 9, 2015. The hospital says she will now be treated "in the hospital's high-level isolation unit under nationally agreed guidelines." Medical authorities say the risk of Cafferkey transmitting the virus is low, but public health officials in Scotland are monitoring people with whom she had close contact. (Lisa Ferguson/Scotland on Sunday/PA via AP) UNITED KINGDOM OUT - NO SALES - NO ARCHIVESLONDON (AP) — A British nurse who recovered from Ebola last year has been hospitalized again for treatment of an unusual late complication, London's Royal Free Hospital said Friday.

New test helps ER docs rule out a heart attack

By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - A new blood test might help doctors figure out faster whether someone’s having a heart attack. The test reliably told doctors which patients were not having heart attacks after only one blood sample, compared to the current method that requires several hours and multiple blood samples, researchers found. "The ultimate goal would be to have a single blood draw for the majority of patients," said study author Dr. Atul Anand, of the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

VW brand faces full-year loss on scandal costs: sources

HAMBURG/BERLIN (Reuters) - Volkswagen's core autos division will likely plunge into a loss this year as it is set to shoulder the bulk of the costs from the fallout of the company's rigging of diesel emissions tests, two company sources said on Friday. VW's namesake brand accounts for about 5 million of the up to 11 million diesel vehicles worldwide that need to be refitted because they could carry software designed to manipulate emissions tests. German magazine Der Spiegel reported the possible loss at VW's largest autos division by sales and revenue earlier on Friday.

Israeli troops kill four Palestinians in protest at Gaza fence: medics

Masked Palestinian protester uses a slingshot to throw stones at Israeli troops as others take cover during clashes in the West Bank city of HebronBy Nidal al-Mughrabi GAZA (Reuters) - Israeli troops fired across the border into Gaza on Friday, killing four Palestinians and wounding at least a dozen others who were throwing stones during a rally in support of protests in Jerusalem, hospital officials in Gaza said. The demonstration was called in solidarity with Palestinians in the occupied West Bank and Jerusalem and followed a spate of attacks by Palestinians against Israelis and reprisals by Jews against Arabs.

Arkansas judge halts scheduled executions of eight inmates

An Arkansas judge issued an order on Friday that temporarily blocked the scheduled executions of eight convicted murderers after lawyers for the death row inmates challenged secrecy provisions in the state's lethal injection procedures. Arkansas, one of the 31 U.S. states with the death penalty, has not carried out an execution since 2005 but had planned to resume capital punishment on Oct. 21 with two executions. Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen took the action after lawyers for the inmates argued on Wednesday that provisions keeping secret the name of the vendors who provide the drugs used in lethal injections violated state law.

Tai chi can help build strength, relieve pain

Johney Yu and Diana Yang, both immigrants from China, practice tai chi at a daily class in AlhambraBy Madeline Kennedy (Reuters Health) - For people with chronic illnesses ranging from cancer to arthritis, Tai chi exercises may improve walking, build strength and reduce pain, according to a new analysis of past research. The slow and gentle movements of Tai chi, a modified form of an ancient Chinese martial art, may be especially suitable for middle aged and older people with multiple health conditions, the authors write in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. “Given the fact that many middle-aged and older persons have more than one chronic condition, it is important to examine the benefits of treatment/exercise interventions across several co-existing conditions,” lead author Yi-Wen Chen, from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, told Reuters Health by email.

Fidgeting while you work might be good for you

Previous research has linked long stretches of sedentary time – whether facing a computer or watching TV – with poor health outcomes even in people who get plenty of exercise, the researchers note in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Cigna drops mail-order requirement for HIV drugs in settlement

Health insurer Cigna Corp on Friday agreed to drop its requirement that patients with HIV/AIDS get some of their medications exclusively through its mail-order pharmacy, settling a consumer lawsuit. California-based advocacy group Consumer Watchdog, which announced the settlement on Friday, had sued Cigna in April in Florida federal court on behalf of a Fort Lauderdale man. When the settlement takes effect on Dec. 1, Cigna patients will be able to get their drugs at any in-network pharmacy.

Whole Foods Recalls Cheese Over Listeria Fears

No illness or infections have been reported in connection with the cheese.

California gives Volkswagen November 20 deadline for technical fix in diesel scandal

A Volkswagen logo is seen on one of the German automaker's cars in a street in Sydney, AustraliaCalifornia has given carmaker Volkswagen until November 20 to come up with a plan to fix the diesel cars affected by its rigging of emissions tests, a spokesman for the California Air Resources Board (CARB) said on Friday. Volkswagen has said up to 11 million diesel vehicles worldwide need to be refitted because they could carry software designed to manipulate emissions tests. The CARB spokesman said the deadline represents 45 business days from an in-use compliance letter sent to Volkswagen dated Sept. 18.

FDA expands lung cancer approval for Bristol-Myers' drug

A trader passes by a screen displaying the tickers symbols for Bristol-Myers Squibb and Intelsat, Ltd. on the floor at the New York Stock ExchangeThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday expanded its approval of Bristol-Myers Squibb Co's immunotherapy drug Opdivo for patients with an additional form of advanced lung cancer. The agency said Opdivo may now be used in patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose disease has progressed during or after platinum-based chemotherapy. Opdivo, known chemically as nivolumab, was first approved to treat advanced melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, and later for squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

Many babies exposed to unnecessary pain in research

Michael Grabinski, two weeks old, has his arm measured at The Children's Hospital in AuroraBy Frederik Joelving (Reuters Health) - Babies often suffer unnecessary pain in clinical studies, potentially breaching international standards for ethical research, according to a new review of the medical literature. “We are urging parents and ethics review boards to refuse studies that do not provide acceptable analgesia to all babies enrolled in studies, if such pain relief exists,” they wrote in Acta Paediatrica, a medical journal, online September 21. “In addition we are calling on medical journals to refuse to publish studies that deny pain relief to control infants undergoing painful procedures.” Research shows babies experience pain more powerfully than adults, according to Celeste Johnston, one of the report’s two authors and an emeritus professor at the Ingram School of Nursing at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

Health groups slam Ukraine for slow polio response

Children and residents wait for the end of the shelling in Donetsk's Petrovski district, in the eastern Ukraine on February 4, 2015Global health groups accused Ukraine on Friday of being critically late and ineffective in responding to Europe's first polio outbreak since 2010. The World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed in late August that two Ukrainian children had been crippled by the virus in the former Soviet state's southwestern Zakarpattya region. Both the WHO and the Kiev government blamed the cases -- the first in Ukraine since 1996 -- on low vaccination coverage throughout the war-torn state.

Boston Scientific mesh verdict slashed to $10 million

By Jessica Dye NEW YORK (Reuters) - A Delaware judge on Friday said Boston Scientific should only have to pay $10 million to a woman originally awarded $100 million by a jury who found she was injured by transvaginal mesh, a device that is the subject of thousands of lawsuits. Judge Mary Johnston in New Castle County, Delaware, said that the damages awarded to plaintiff Deborah Barba in May – the largest ever in a trial involving transvaginal mesh - were “grossly disproportionate to the injuries suffered and shock the court’s conscience and sense of justice.” But Johnston denied Boston Scientific's bid to set aside the verdict altogether and order a new trial. While the jury had properly decided the company's liability, Johnston wrote in her ruling that the jury’s award was too high, particularly in comparison with the other mesh trials, in which punitive damages awards spanned from $1.75 million to $7.76 million.

Presidential candidate Sanders opposes Obama's FDA nominee

Sanders delivers remarks at a Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute presidential candidates forum in WashingtonU.S. Senator Bernie Sanders, who is seeking the Democratic presidential nomination, said on Friday he will vote against Dr. Robert Califf as the next commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, citing the nominee's close ties to the pharmaceutical industry. "Instead of listening to the demands of the pharmaceutical industry and their 1,400 lobbyists, it is about time that the FDA and Congress started listening to the overwhelming majority of the American people, who believe that medicine is too expensive," Sanders said in a news release announcing his intention to vote against Califf. President Barack Obama nominated Califf, a prominent cardiologist and researcher at Duke University who joined the FDA in January as a deputy commissioner, on Sept. 15.

Court battle over Amish girl's cancer treatment ends

An Ohio judge on Friday formally ended a court effort to force chemotherapy on an Amish girl whose parents had defied a hospital over her treatment for leukemia, according to a ruling released on Friday. Medina County Probate and Juvenile Judge Kevin Dunn terminated the medical guardianship for the girl, ending a legal battle over the limits on parents' rights to make medical decisions. A court-appointed medical guardian had already given up on forcing the girl to resume chemotherapy after her family left the country for a while in 2013 to pursue alternative treatments that the family said improved the girl's condition.

Eye-tracking devices may help ICU patients communicate

By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Eye-tracking devices might help some patients communicate even when mechanical ventilators make it impossible for them to speak, a small pilot project suggests. Researchers offered eye-trackers to 12 patients on ventilators in intensive care units (ICUs) at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, during 2013 and 2014. All of the participants were cognitively capable of communication and able to convey comprehension by blinking, nodding their head or some other motion.

Support rising for outdoor smoking bans in U.S., Canada

A no smoking sign is seen in HanoverBy Janice Neumann (Reuters Health) - A growing number of people in the U.S. and Canada support smoke-free laws for outdoor venues, especially where children congregate or at building entrances, according to a new review of public surveys. Based on 89 surveys in both countries between 1993 and 2014, researchers say the growth of support for smoking restrictions, even among smokers, shows that outdoor smoking bans can achieve majority support. “This and other studies have found that it looks like people may become more favorable towards these regulations once they’re put in place and they get used to them,” said Deborah Ossip, president-elect of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, who was not involved in the study.

Measles can be a lesser-known risk for travelers

By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Measles is still a risk for travelers, regardless of destination, and vaccination remains the best way to prevent it, according to travel health experts. Data from 57 travel and tropical medicine clinics on six continents shows that between 2000 and 2014, there were 94 reported measles cases in these clinics, with two-thirds occurring after 2010. Measles affected tourists, business travelers, and people visiting friends or family.

Nestle spends $70 million on U.S. health science hub

A logo is pictured outside the Nestle Institute of Health Sciences at the EPFL in Ecublens near LausanneNestle's health science division is investing $70 million in a product technology center that will become the unit's new U.S. headquarters and research hub, the division said on Friday. The Bridgewater, New Jersey center will further Nestle's healthcare push as the Swiss company delves deeper into nutritional therapy and the high-margin medicines arena. Opening in 2016, the hub will relocate the unit's current research and development activities from Minneapolis and its current headquarters from nearby Florham Park.

US boosts privacy protection on health insurance website

In this photo taken Oct. 6, 2015, the website, where people can buy health insurance, is displayed on a laptop screen in Washington. The Obama administration says it’s strengthening privacy protections for consumers on the government’s health insurance website ahead of a new sign-up season starting Nov. 1. In a blog Friday, CEO Kevin Counihan says the web page will have a new ‘privacy manager’ that lets consumers opt out of embedded connections to third-party advertising, analytics and social media sites. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)WASHINGTON (AP) — Responding to criticism from civil liberties advocates, the Obama administration said Friday it has strengthened consumer privacy protections on the government's health insurance website as a new sign-up season nears.

India risks backsliding on success against HIV-U.N. envoy

J.V.R. Prasada Rao, United Nations special envoy for AIDS in Asia and the Pacific, poses inside his residence in Bengaluru, IndiaBy Aditya Kalra NEW DELHI (Reuters) - New HIV infections in India could rise for the first time in more than a decade because states are mismanaging a prevention program by delaying payments to health workers, the United Nations envoy for AIDS in Asia and the Pacific said. India's efforts to fight HIV have for years centered around community-based programs run for people at high risk of contracting the virus, such as sex workers and injecting drug users.

California to enact comprehensive medical marijuana regulations

Brown speaks to reporters while proposing his 2015-16 state budget in SacramentoSACRAMENTO, Calif./LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - California Governor Jerry Brown on Friday signed into law the state's first comprehensive regulations of medical marijuana, two decades after legalization fueled a wild west of disparate local rules, a gray market in cultivation and concerns about the ease of obtaining the drug. The package of three laws, viewed by some as a possible framework for the eventual legalization of recreational marijuana in the most populous U.S. state, would establish a Bureau of Medical Marijuana Regulation and oversee such activities as cultivation and dispensary licensing. The bills, which take effect in 2018, "establish a long-overdue comprehensive regulatory framework for the production, transportation and sale of medical marijuana," Brown, a Democrat, said in a signing statement on Friday.

Rohingya trafficking victims endure stress of limbo, stranded in Thailand

Hands of a Rohingya victim of trafficking are seen as he listens to questions during an interview with the Thomson Reuters Foundation at a temporary shelter in Hat Yai, Songkla, ThailandBy Alisa Tang RATTAPHUM, Thailand (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The strapping 23-year-old Rohingya Muslim was matter of fact as he described being forced onto a boat in Myanmar for a tortuous two-month-long journey, beaten and kicked by traffickers as he watched scores die of starvation and thirst along the way. On many evenings in this compound of cement buildings that has become home to 66 male Rohingya trafficking victims from Myanmar and 19 from Bangladesh, the man cried, homesick. Late last month, the shelter staff took pity on him, granting him a five-minute phone call to his home in Sittwe in western Myanmar's Rakhine state.

Sientra suspends sales of medical implants made by Brazilian contract partner

A laboratory worker of Silimed factory checks silicone implants at a factory.(Reuters) - Breast implant maker Sientra Inc said it has placed a temporary hold on sales of medical implants made by a Brazilian contract manufacturer, sending its shares down 11 percent in extended trading. Sientra also said it recommends that plastic surgeons temporarily discontinue implanting all Sientra devices made by the Brazilian contractor, Silimed, until further notice. Sientra said its decision followed discussions with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regarding Brazilian regulatory inquiries into products manufactured by Silimed.

Exclusive: GE nears deal to sell over $30 billion of loans to Wells Fargo - source

The logo of General Electric is pictured at the 26th World Gas Conference in ParisGeneral Electric Co is in advanced talks to sell a specialty finance portfolio, worth more than $30 billion, to Wells Fargo & Co , according to a person familiar with the matter, as the industrial conglomerate returns to its roots. Wells Fargo has so far outbid other parties for General Electric's vendor financing, commercial distribution finance and direct lending assets, the person with direct knowledge of the situation said on Friday. GE and Wells Fargo representatives declined to comment.

Rescued Chilean miners were 'battle scarred: author

Mario Sepulveda celebrates his rescue in CopiapoPulitzer-Prize-winning writer Hector Tobar says the 33 Chilean miners trapped deep underground for 69 days in 2010 were left "battle scarred" from the ordeal, despite quickly becoming minor celebrities after their improbable rescue. "They were like guys who had been through war." The miners' rescue drew heavy international coverage, and Chile’s then-president Sebastian Pinera personally greeted the workers as they emerged from a freshly drilled shaft one-by-one in October 2010. Eventually, the miners chose Tobar to author the official account of their experience.

The children's book that claims it will put your child to sleep

Train to breathe like a pro athlete

Bullying by peers has effects later in life

Bullying can be defined by many things. It's teasing, name-calling, stereotyping, fighting, exclusion, spreading rumors, public shaming and aggressive intimidation. It can be in person and online. But it can no longer be considered a rite of passage that strengthens character, new research suggests.

Can exercise help with bullying?

A great deal of research points to the physical and psychological benefits of exercise. For teens, these benefits are particularly important, given that adolescence is a time of accelerated development and habit formation.

In first, 3 'Ebola countries' had no new cases in 1 week

Dear Lupus, I want me back

My name is Lauren Johnson. I'm an associate producer at CNN, and I have systemic lupus erythematosus.

Exoskeleton helps blind and paralyzed adventurer

Robot exoskeleton suits that could make us superhuman

If you've been dreaming of strapping on your own "Iron Man" armor, you might have to wait a while longer. But revolutionary "bionic exoskeletons," like the metal suit worn by comic book hero Tony Stark, might be closer than you think -- just don't expect to fly away in one.

Prosthetic hand 'tells' the brain what it is touching

Research on prosthetic hands has come a long way, but most of it has focused on improving the way the body controls the device.

If 'breast is best' for newborns, where's the support in hospitals?

Possible shark attack helps man discover cancerous tumor

Army issues new breastfeeding policy

The Army issued a service-wide breastfeeding policy this week, making it the last military branch to implement guidelines for supporting nursing service members.

Heart health in the 'stroke belt'

Why elephants don't get cancer?

Healthy eating, Roman style: Ancient Pompeiians had surprisingly good teeth

Curbing college binge drinking

Baby born without a complete skull defies odds

Anti-bullying laws appear to be working

Why 3-day weekends are good for you

38 years later, burn victim reunites with loving nurse

Study: Smoking will kill one out of three young Chinese men

The latest on the cucumber salmonella outbreak

Why geniuses always wear the same clothes

"Decision fatigue" -- being mentally worn out by making menial choices -- is a real phenomenon. Some famous figures have chosen to wear similar clothes each day to reduce the decisions they have to make in the morning, enabling them to get on with the real work.

With breast milk online, it's buyer beware

Your great-great-grandmother might have called for a wet nurse. In today's e-commerce world, if you're having trouble breast-feeding, you can easily buy breast milk online and feed your baby yourself.

Soldiers in uniform pose for photo to 'normalize breastfeeding'

There were no lactation rooms or dedicated spaces for breastfeeding mothers when Tara Ruby was on active duty in the Air Force from 1997 to 2001.

Ebola nurse 'in serious condition'

A Scottish nurse who contracted Ebola in Sierra Leone last year is in a "serious condition" after being readmitted to an isolation unit in London.

Suspicious Nigeria death not Ebola: WHO

A man whose death in the southern Nigerian city of Calabar triggered an Ebola scare did not have the virus, the World Health Organization says.

Heart attack test 'cuts hospital stays'

A blood test can more than halve the number of people admitted to hospital with a suspected heart attack, say doctors.

Flu drug given out "indiscriminately"

The antiviral drug Tamiflu was handed out "indiscriminately" during the last swine flu outbreak, a leading panel of UK scientists warns.

DNA repair wins chemistry Nobel

The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry is awarded for discoveries in DNA repair.

Councils reject 2 in 3 for care

Two-thirds of older and disabled people who turn to their local councils in England for help with care are turned away, figures show.

Ovarian transplants are 'safe option'

Ovarian transplants are a safe and effective way for women who have had cancer to have their own children, a study suggests.

UK end-of-life care 'best in world'

End-of-life care in the UK has been ranked as the best in the world with a study praising the quality and availability of services.

Nobel Prize for anti-parasite drugs

The Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine has been awarded to two teams for their groundbreaking work on parasitic diseases.

California enacts right-to-die law

California has joined four other US states that allow terminally ill patients to legally to end their lives with a doctor's supervision.

NHS should welcome 'citizen whistleblowers'

Why the NHS should listen to people who see something amiss

'Cancer made me want mashed potato'

The strange effects of cancer on appetite

VIDEO: How can Ebola survivors get ill again?

BBC News looks at how it is possible for Ebola survivors to contract the virus again.

VIDEO: Liz Hurley on breast cancer campaign

Actor and model Elizabeth Hurley tells the Victoria Derbyshire programmed why she is campaigning for better awareness of what happens to women after a breast cancer diagnosis.

VIDEO: Toddler's head re-attached to spine

A toddler is expected to make a full recovery after a near-fatal car accident caused his head to detach from his spine.

VIDEO: 'We drank during our pregnancies'

A new report advises pregnant women to avoid alcohol completely. Two mothers who drank while expecting give their reaction.

VIDEO: Study praises UK end-of-life care

The UK provides the best care in the world for people nearing the end of their lives, according to a new study.

VIDEO: California passes right-to-die bill

California is to be the fifth American state to allow terminally ill patients to end their lives, legally.

VIDEO: German donor meets transplant girl

A donor from Germany who was a perfect match for a girl whose life was saved by a bone marrow transplant has come to Warwickshire to meet her.

VIDEO: Nobel Prize rewards parasite research

The Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine has been split two ways for groundbreaking work on parasitic diseases.

What different countries say about assisted dying

What different countries say about assisted dying

Work that won Nobel Prize for medicine 2015

A look at the work that won this year's Nobel Prize in medicine

How can scientists 'cure' blindness?

How can scientists 'cure' blindness?

Why is the NHS short of some key drugs?

Why is the NHS short of some key drugs?

The island of colour blindness

On Pingelap, a tenth of the population is totally colour-blind.

What's a fair price for a drug?

Who decides what's fair when it comes to putting a price on life-saving medicines?

Elephants' low cancer rates explained

Elephants have enhanced defences against cancer that can prevent tumours forming, say scientists.

China faces smoking 'death epidemic'

A new study warns that a third of all men currently under the age of 20 in China will die prematurely if they do not give up smoking.

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