Health News
10/31/2014

On Denton's Upcoming Referendum for a Fracking Ban


On Denton's Upcoming Referendum for a Fracking BanBy: Najmedin Meshkati, Nima Jabbari, Jamie Heinecke, and Cyrus Ashayeri As we all know, on November 4 there will be a referendum on a fracking ban in Denton, TX. Regardless of the outcome, the impact of this unprecedented grassroots movement will transcend well beyond Denton's city limits and affect the future of the entire oil and gas fracking...



Staying Lean This Halloween


Staying Lean This HalloweenIt's that time of year when tricks and treats seem to find their way into your pantry, much to the dismay of your weight loss and health goals. A bit of nervousness and fear is probably setting in for you've been here before, and although you often start this season off with the best intentions, "THIS year it's going to be different!" or "THIS...



Sleep apnea tied to memory problems


By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - The ability to remember locations and directions may suffer when deep sleep is disrupted by breathing difficulties, a new study suggests. People with sleep apnea tended to score worse on spatial memory tests after sleeping without their breathing aid, compared to mornings after they’d used their breathing aids at night, researchers found. “There had been some evidence in animal models that REM sleep or dreaming sleep is important for spatial memory, but no one had shown or proven that in people,” said Dr. ...

Watch: How to Properly Put on a Hazmat Suit


Doctors at the NIH in Maryland demonstrate the use of protective equipment used for treating Ebola patients.

5 Tips to 'Fall Back' From Daylight Saving Time


What's better than sleeping in on a Sunday? How about dodging the days-long consequences of rolling the clocks back this weekend?

Watch: Hannah Storm's Campaign for Children


The sports journalist is giving back beauty.

Conflicts at home affect teens at school and vice versa


By Shereen Lehman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - - Conflicts in a teen's life can spill over at school and at home for days afterward, a new study suggests. Finding out why the spillover occurs, and which teens are most vulnerable to it, could help target ways to interrupt this damaging negative feedback loop, the study team writes in the journal Child Development. “We know that family conflict is a risk factor for poor school performance, but less is known about how these processes are associated on a daily basis,” lead author Adela Timmons told Reuters Health in an email. ...

Did You Look Beyond the Pink This Breast Cancer Awareness Month?


Did You Look Beyond the Pink This Breast Cancer Awareness Month?As October comes to an end, the pink martinis have been drunk, the pink pompoms have gone flat, and the grocery store is getting ready to change out their donation signage for another important cause. But breast cancer? It doesn't care one bit about the calendar. I know this because if it did, when my friend Dana was 37 weeks pregnant with her...



Judge issues order enforcing Ebola isolation of defiant Maine nurse


Nurse Kaci Hickox and her boyfriend Ted Wilbur address the media during an informal meeting with the news media outside their home in Fort KentWASHINGTON (Reuters) - The confrontation between the state of Maine and a nurse who treated Ebola patients in Sierra Leone heated up on Friday when a judge issued a temporary order enforcing a quarantine after she defied state officials and took a bike ride. The order from Charles LaVerdiere, chief judge of the Maine District Court, instructs nurse Kaci Hickox to submit to "direct active monitoring," and "not to be present in public places" like shopping centers, movie theaters or workplaces except to receive necessary healthcare. ...



Habits That Could Be Making You Age Prematurely


Taking care of your body should be a top priority. Unfortunately, in a world of flavored sodas and lazy Segways, we lose track of what it means to take care of ourselves. Exercise is key, and eating properly plays just as major of a role. But, there are other habits of our day to day lives that are negatively affecting our bodies.Click Here to...

Sierra Leone soccer boss backs Nations Cup postponement over Ebola


Sierra Leone's Michael Lahoud fights for the ball with with Ivory Coast's Bony Wilfried during their 2015 African Nations Cup qualifying soccer match in AbidjanCAPE TOWN (Reuters) - The president of the Sierra Leone Football Association (SLFA), who has seen the sport come to a "grinding halt" in her country because of the Ebola outbreak, has backed host Morocco's request to have the African Cup of Nations finals postponed. Isha Johansen also revealed that the SLFA has used money donated to the organisation by the sport's international governing body FIFA, which had been intended to develop football infrastructure, to drive charity projects raising awareness of how to avoid contracting the deadly disease. ...



This Halloween, Let's Protect Kids From the Deadliest Demons


This Halloween, Let's Protect Kids From the Deadliest DemonsWith Halloween just around the corner, little goblins and ghosts are preparing for the eeriest evening of the year. Their spooky costumes are ready and their jack-o-lanterns carved, witch cackles practiced and down to an art. But when trick-or-treaters take to the streets tonight, the most spine-chilling horror will be nowhere in sight.That's...



WHO says 2 suspected Ebola cases in Mali, 57 contacts sought


GENEVA (Reuters) - Two people are suspected of having Ebola after coming into contact with a two-year-old girl who died of the disease in Mali last week, according to data from the World Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. An epidemiological presentation by both agencies, given on Thursday and seen by Reuters on Friday, breaks down the girl's journey from Guinea to Mali with her grandmother, five-year-old sister and her uncle, and shows she may have had contact with 141 people in all, 57 of them yet to be identified. ...

China to send elite army unit to help fight Ebola in Liberia


Medical staff members take part in a Ebola virus preventive drill at Ditan Hospital in BeijingBy Megha Rajagopalan BEIJING (Reuters) - China will dispatch an elite unit of the People's Liberation Army to help Ebola-hit Liberia, the Foreign Ministry said on Friday, responding to U.N. calls for a greater global effort to fight the deadly virus in West Africa. Washington has led the international drive to stop the spread of the disease that has killed nearly 5,000 people, sending thousands of troops and committing about $1 billion, but Beijing has faced criticism for not doing enough. ...



Police harass Kenyan patients and clinics as abortion battle heats up


By Katy Migiro NAIROBI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Police threats against patients and medics they accuse of giving "illegal abortions", coupled with reversals in Kenyan policies, are stirring fears likely to reduce access to safe abortions, campaigners said. Doctors and nurses say police intimidation has increased since last month’s sentencing to death of a nurse, Jackson Tali, for murder after a woman died in his car. ...

Japan's central bank shocks markets with more easing as inflation slows


Bank of Japan Governor Kuroda walks into a news conference at the BOJ headquarters in TokyoBy Leika Kihara and Tetsushi Kajimoto TOKYO (Reuters) - The Bank of Japan shocked global financial markets on Friday by expanding its massive stimulus spending in a stark admission that economic growth and inflation have not picked up as much as expected after a sales tax hike in April. BOJ Governor Haruhiko Kuroda portrayed the board's tightly-split decision to buy more assets as a preemptive strike to keep policy on track, rather than an admission that his plan to reflate the long moribund-economy had derailed. ...



Siemens seen picking EQT for hearing aids next week


MUNICH/LONDON (Reuters) - Siemens is likely to pick EQT next week to buy its hearing aids unit for about 2 billion euros ($2.5 billion), two sources familiar with the matter said. Danish hearing aid maker GN Store Nord was also in the running. Private equity firm Permira, which had been interested, is now out of the race, another source close to the matter said. Siemens' board is expected to make a decision on the matter next Wednesday, all three sources said. Siemens and EQT declined to comment. ...

Soldier or civilian, Ebola protocols not the same


Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel speaks during a briefing at the Pentagon, Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014. Hagel ordered military men and women helping fight Ebola to undergo 21-day quarantines that start upon their return _ instead of their last exposure to an Ebola patient. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. soldier returning from an Ebola response mission in West Africa would have to spend 21 days being monitored, isolated in a military facility away from family and the broader population. A returning civilian doctor or nurse who directly treated Ebola patients? Depends.



India considers ban on e-cigarettes, sale of single smokes


By Aditya Kalra NEW DELHI (Reuters) - India is considering a ban on electronic cigarettes over the risks to public health that they may cause, a senior Health Ministry official told Reuters. The World Health Organization (WHO) in August called for stiff regulation of e-cigarettes as well as bans on indoor use, in the latest bid to control the booming $3 billion global market. Such devices use battery-powered cartridges to produce a nicotine-laced vapor but there is a lack of long-term scientific research that confirms they are safe. ...

A look at Ebola guidelines in some states


States have broad authority to quarantine people to prevent the spread of disease, and several are exercising that right to go beyond the safety recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control for containing the deadly Ebola virus.

JAL worried about potential impact of Ebola on travel market


TOKYO (Reuters) - Japan Airlines Co Ltd CEO Yoshiharu Ueki on Friday expressed worry about the potential impact of the Ebola outbreak on the travel market. "I'm very concerned, the potential impact could be great," he said at an earnings briefing. (Reporting by Tim Kelly; Editing by Chris Gallagher)

To stop Ebola's spread in West Africa, target funerals: study


Volunteers lower a corpse, which is prepared with safe burial practices, into a grave in KailahunBy Sharon Begley NEW YORK (Reuters) - As the global health community ramps up its efforts to treat Ebola patients and curb its spread in West Africa, a new analysis finds that the greatest impact would come from insuring safe burials for victims, scientists reported on Thursday. The need for safe burials has been known from the beginning of the epidemic last spring, when people who attended the funeral of a faith healer in Guinea became infected. U.S. ...



Fighting likely to surge in South Sudan as rainy season ends - report


By Alex Whiting LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The end of the rainy season is imminent and warring parties in South Sudan's civil war are preparing for major offensives likely to cause fresh displacement and hunger, the think-tank International Crisis Group said in a report. President Salva Kiir's government forces and rebels allied to his former deputy Riek Machar have been fighting since December 2013, despite ongoing peace talks in Addis Ababa and several ceasefire agreements. A growing number of militias and self-defence forces are joining the conflict. ...

Accused in Canada dismemberment trial had troubled childhood, his father says


An artist's sketch shows Luka Rocco Magnotta in court for his preliminary hearing in MontrealBy Allison Lampert MONTREAL (Reuters) - The Canadian man who killed and dismembered a Chinese student in 2012 was raised by a domineering mother who would get drunk on vodka and was obsessed with germs, the man's father testified on Friday, while describing himself as an alcoholic schizophrenic. Luka Magnotta, 32, has admitted killing and dismembering engineering student Jun Lin, 33, and to videotaping the acts and mailing parts of the body to several addresses. He is pleading not guilty due to mental illness. ...



Judge rejects Ebola quarantine for nurse


FORT KENT, Maine (AP) — A Maine judge gave nurse Kaci Hickox the OK to go wherever she pleases, handing state officials a defeat Friday in their bid to restrict her movements as a precaution against Ebola.

China lifts suspension on Washington State delicious apples


WASHINGTON (Reuters) - China is lifting its suspension on the import of red and golden delicious apples from Washington State, reopening a market once valued at about $6.5 million a year, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said on Friday. The restrictions were placed in 2012 by Chinese quarantine authorities due to the repeated interception of three apple pests: speck rot, bull's-eye rot, and Sphaeropsis rot. Since then, USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service worked with the U.S. ...

Flu or Ebola? US hospitals prepare for a confusing season


Local residents gather brochures about Ebola prior to a meeting with community leaders and Health Department medical professionals October 29, 2014 at the Bronx Museum of the Arts in New YorkAfter weeks of Ebola panic, false alarms and quibbles over quarantine in the United States, health authorities are bracing for a new battle: flu season. The end of October marks the start of influenza season, bringing with it the predictable sniffles, sneezes, fever and aches that can extend well into the spring months. First is the Ebola epidemic in West Africa that spilled into the United States when a Liberian man traveled to Texas in September and infected two nurses who helped care for him. The prospect of facing all three illnesses in a single season has led the CDC to start a public education campaign to help people understand the risks, and to remind people to get their annual flu vaccine.



Judge rejection of quarantine over Ebola good compromise: nurse


(Reuters) - The American nurse who had defied the state of Maine's quarantine order after her return from Sierra Leone treating Ebola patients said a judge's rejection of the order on Friday was a good compromise. Maine Governor Paul LePage wanted the nurse, Kaci Hickox, to be quarantined in her house until the middle of next month even though she has tested negative for the virus and says she is healthy. (Reporting by Jonathan Allen; Editing by Grant McCool)

Ebola death toll rises, fewer cases in Guinea than thought: WHO


A billboard with a message about Ebola is seen on a street in Conakry, GuineaGENEVA (Reuters) - The Ebola epidemic has killed 4,951 people out of 13,567 infected in eight countries, the World Health Organization said on Friday, slightly revising downwards its figures for cases mainly due to "suspected cases in Guinea being discarded". The toll reflects a rise of 31 deaths since the United Nations agency reported its previous figures on Wednesday, while the number of overall cases fell by 136. ...



Republicans question preparedness spending after Ebola missteps


U.S. President Barack Obama talks next to U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Burwell after meeting with his team coordinating the government's Ebola response in the Oval Office of the White House in WashingtonBy David Morgan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Texas Republicans, including Tea Party-backed U.S. Senator Ted Cruz, sought to ratchet up the pressure on the Obama administration's Ebola response on Friday, by questioning its use of federal tax dollars for emergency preparedness. In a letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell, the lawmakers said they were concerned about missteps in the Dallas Ebola case of Thomas Eric Duncan, which they said occurred after large sums of federal money were spent to help U.S. cities prepare for infectious diseases. ...



Judge eases limits on nurse who treated Ebola patients


By Joel Page FORT KENT Maine (Reuters) - A Maine judge on Friday imposed limited restrictions on an American nurse who treated Ebola patients in Sierra Leone and rejected a bid by state officials for more stringent measures. The confrontation between Kaci Hickox and officials in the state of Maine has become the focal point of a dispute pitting several U.S. states opting for strict quarantines against the federal government, which opposes such measures. ...

Routines most vital in avoiding Ebola infection: WHO


Health workers take part in a pre-deployment training for staff heading to Ebola-hit areas on October 29, 2014 in GenevaMeticulously following stringent routines when putting on and removing protective equipment is more important than the kind of gear health care workers use to ward off Ebola infection, the World Health Organization said Friday. "The choice of (protective equipment) is much less important than the way it is used," said Edward Kelley, head of service delivery and safety at WHO. Presenting updated WHO guidelines on the use of personal protective equipment, or PPE, he said health care workers contracting Ebola on the job were not doing so because they made the wrong choice of gear. "It's the way that PPE has been put on and taken off," he told reporters, stressing the importance of in-depth training and clear systems in which health care workers always have a colleague watching and guiding their dressing and undressing.



Judge's rejection of nurse quarantine 'unfortunate': Maine governor


(Reuters) - Maine Governor Paul LePage said on Friday it was unfortunate that a judge rejected the state's attempts to impose a strict quarantine on an American nurse who treated Ebola patients in West Africa, but said he will abide by the ruling. The ruling appeared to end a stand-off between the state and the nurse, Kaci Hickox, who had defied officials by leaving her house and going for a bike ride. "The judge has eased restrictions with this ruling. And I believe it is unfortunate," LePage said in a statement. "However, the state will abide by law." (Reporting by Jonathan Allen)

AbbVie says strong results lessen need for big deal


A screen displays the share price for pharmaceutical maker AbbVie on the floor of the New York Stock ExchangeBy Ransdell Pierson (Reuters) - AbbVie, which this month abandoned its planned $55 billion purchase of Dublin drugmaker Shire , reported impressive quarterly earnings on demand for its Humira arthritis drug and said it could deliver strong long-term growth without rushing into another big merger attempt. "The underlying growth prospects of AbbVie don't require us to do a deal of that size," AbbVie Chief Executive Richard Gonzalez said in conference call, but added the company was keen on smaller acquisitions, particularly of treatments involving rare diseases, cancer and hepatology. ...



Medicare paid for meds after patients were dead


FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2014 file photo, Medicaid Administrator Marilyn Tavenner testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. A government watchdog agency says Medicare’s prescription drug program kept paying for costly medications even after patients were dead. The problem seems to have started with a bureaucratic rule now getting a second look. A report coming out Friday from the Health and Human Services inspector general says Medicare has been allowing payment for prescriptions filled up to 32 days after a patient’s death. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it drugs for the departed: A quirky bureaucratic rule led Medicare's prescription drug program to pay for costly medications even after the patients were dead.



Judge imposes conditions on Maine nurse, rejects stricter measures: lawyer


NEW YORK (Reuters) - A Maine judge imposed certain conditions on an American nurse who treated Ebola patients in Sierra Leone but rejected a bid from state officials for more restrictive measures, her lawyer told Reuters. Charles LaVerdiere, chief judge of Maine District Court, on Thursday had earlier instructed Kaci Hickox to avoid "public places" like shopping centers and to maintain a three-foot distance from others at the state's request, hours after she defied officials and went for a bike ride. ...

No Quarantine for Kaci Hickox While She Awaits Hearing, Judge Rules


Temporary court order prohibits her from public places.

Mali Ebola victim had contact with 141 people, 57 still sought


Health worker checks the temperature of a baby entering Mali from Guinea at the border in KouremaleBy Tom Miles GENEVA (Reuters) - A 2-year-old girl who brought Ebola to Mali may have had contact with as many as 141 people, 57 of whom have yet to be traced, according to health experts concerned the disease could spread in Mali and beyond. Two people known to have had contact with the girl were suspected of having the disease, according to a slide presentation by the World Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control seen by Reuters on Friday. One of the two had not been tested and the other had been tested but with no result yet known. ...



U.S. envoy to U.N. defends Ebola guidelines; praises airlines


U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power speaks during a Reuters Newsmaker panel discussion, "The Ebola Crisis: How it Arose and What you Need to Know" in New YorkBy Louis Charbonneau and Bill Berkrot NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power on Friday defended federal guidelines for monitoring health workers returning from three Ebola-stricken West African countries and praised the airlines still flying there. Amid controversy in the United States over some states ordering 21-day quarantines for nurses and doctors returning home after treating Ebola patients, Power said current federal rules balanced "the need to respond to the fears that this has generated" with the known science on the disease. ...



Africans worst responders in Ebola crisis


JOHANNESBURG (AP) — The head of Africa's continental body did not get to an Ebola-hit country until last week — months after alarm bells first rang and nearly 5,000 deaths later.

Hallucinogens to treat depression?


Psychedelic drugs are being researched as a potential treatment for conditions ranging from anxiety to tobacco and alcohol addiction.

Lack of sleep may shrink your brain


Can sleep deprivation affect the size of your brain? It's possible, a recent study published in an online issue of Neurology suggests.

Mental illness: Time to break taboo


350 million people around the world suffer from depression. Why aren't we talking about it?

Schizophrenia is eight disorders


What we know -- and psychiatrists have diagnosed for decades -- as schizophrenia may really be eight separate diseases, research published in The American Journal of Psychiatry suggests.

Adam's story: 63 pills a day


The modest clinic on Milpas Street in laid-back Santa Barbara, California, was well known to patients seeking powerful pain medication.

This is your body on weed


Dr. Sanjay Gupta explains how marijuana affects the brain and how pot can be used to treat certain conditions.

Teacher eats only McDonald's


A teacher only eats McDonald's for 90 days, and LOSES 37 pounds. KCCI reports.

World's most dangerous workout?


Is the "sport of fitness" the world's most dangerous workout? CNN's Jarrett Bellini asks CrossFitters and gives it a go.

Can we predict the future of medicine?


Although designer babies and a disease-free world may or may not come to pass, you can get a glimpse of the most promising and upcoming medical innovations of 2015, via the Cleveland Clinic.

The diseases lurking in the sewers


An ambitious project will test sewage for hidden diseases circulating in cities, detecting illnesses people don't even know they have.

'A' for effort: Teacher transforms


At his heaviest, high school teacher Jeff Baxter was 465 pounds. Then he lost 270 pounds and went on to become "Teacher of the Year."

See King Tut's 'virtual autopsy'


King Tutankhamun's golden, mummified remains tell only a partial story of an ancient Egyptian boy king who died under mysterious circumstances.

What 'Lady Ganga' did before dying


"I had to film her death," Frederic Lumiere says softly. "In the film, I'm behind the camera, and you can hear me crying."

Scientists link 60 genes to autism risk


Researchers have found dozens of new genes that may play a role in causing autism, according to two studies published Wednesday in the medical journal Nature.

Could Google pill detect cancer?


Google is developing a pill that would hunt for cancer cells in human bodies. CNN's Laurie Segall reports.

A one-woman Ebola hospital


22-year-old Fatu Kekula nursed her mother, father and sister through Ebola using trash bags to protect herself.

Crab's blood could save your life


Hundreds of thousands of horseshoe crabs are captured each year for their incredible blue blood.

The monster that took my son


A week before Cole died, I promised him he would do "something big" someday. For two years, I have been fighting to keep that promise.

Game company to help 'Operation' creator with operation costs


John Spinello created the game of "Operation" nearly 50 years ago. Since then, millions have attempted to remove small plastic body parts from Cavity Sam without lighting up his red nose and hearing that sweat-inducing BUZZ.

Maine judge rejects Ebola quarantine for nurse


A Maine judge on Friday ruled in favor of a nurse who defied a quarantine in a tense standoff with state authorities, saying local health officials failed to prove the need for a stricter order enforcing an Ebola quarantine.

Scientists link 60 genes to autism risk


Researchers have found dozens of new genes that may play a role in autism, according to two studies published in the journal Nature.

Kaci Hickox's boyfriend: 'We don't believe that we can get anyone sick'


The boyfriend of a Maine nurse who defied an Ebola quarantine is speaking out, saying isolating returnees from West Africa will affect their partners as well.

A welcome -- or not -- for health workers from Africa's Ebola zone


Maine's plan to impose a mandatory quarantine on nurse Kaci Hickox highlights an individual liberty versus public safety controversy about health workers returning from Africa's Ebola zone.

'Lady Ganga': What she did with just a few months to live


"I had to film her death," Frederic Lumiere says softly. "In the film, I'm behind the camera, and you can hear me crying."

Brittany Maynard on decision to die: Now isn't the right time


Brittany Maynard says she hasn't decided yet when she'll end her life, but it's a decision she's still determined to make.

What are the odds of 12 sons in a row?


They may not beat the Duggars for sheer number of children, but this couple in Michigan has their own kind of reality-TV-worthy reproduction streak going on.

Could Google pill detect cancer?


Google is developing a pill that would hunt for cancer cells in human bodies. CNN's Laurie Segall reports.

Straighten out smartphone slump!


As you cradle your smartphone or lean into your laptop to read this, what's your posture like? Even if you aren't doing it right now, how much of your day is spent with your neck lurched forward, shoulders slumped and chest collapsed? All that time in "smartphone slump" not only makes you look and feel stressed, it can cause persistent pain.

The 5 biggest breakfast myths


The first meal of the day can have a very different meaning for different people.

5 healthy Halloween treats


We love Halloween season. Sweets. Sweaters. Sipping hot cider (maybe spiked). Halloween can certainly get you in the spirit, and nothing warms our hearts like these healthy Halloween treats that help you stay energized instead of stuck in a sugar coma.

Reduce your risk of dementia


The statistics, unfortunately, are staggering. An estimated 44 million people worldwide are living with dementia, according to a report released Tuesday by Alzheimer's Disease International.

50 pounds lost for 50th reunion


In January, Carol Highsmith, 68, began a journey of threes. She had three milestones of 50 that she planned to reach by following three simple rules:

How rabbi lost 100 pounds


Rabbi Pesach Sommer lost 100 pounds after a doctor told him he had type 2 diabetes.

It's time to get your flu shot!


Flu season is about to begin, the CDC says. And health officials have a few updates to their recommendations.

Flu shot myths addressed


Flu vaccine myths can confuse people trying to decide whether to get a shot. Here are five common myths and, based on information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the truth.

Vintage cold and flu ads



Electrodes in brain to treat Tourette's


A pioneering procedure might be the answer to ending the misery of Tourette's syndrome.

The next medicinal marijuana?


Ayahuasca is a psychedelic drink that's attracting more and more tourists to the remote corners of the Amazon. But is it a drug, or is it medicine?

New link between coffee and DNA


You can blame that third cup of Joe on your genes.

Music helps your brain


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us why music therapy is good for the brain and how it can help us live to 100.

Live to 100: Laugh more


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us how laughing more can help us live to 100.

Eat chocolate. Yes, chocolate.


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tell us how eating certain types of chocolate can help us live to 100.

Visit to Sanjay Gupta's past


Dr. Sanjay Gupta traveled from Pakistan to Michigan to discover his family's roots. Here's what he learned along the way.

How to really lose weight


From what to eat to how much to exercise, Elizabeth Cohen explains what you really need to do to lose weight.

Keeping young athletes safe


CNN's Holly Firfer reports on ways parents can keep their student athletes safe.

Lab holds 2,000 brains


The University of Miami Brain Endowment Bank provides brain tissues to researchers to study various brain disorders.

Smart toothbrush tracks brushing


This Bluetooth enabled toothbrush coaches you while you brush and tracks your progress through a smartphone app.

Farming in the city


This urban farm supplies fresh produce to food deserts, but also offers other benefits to individuals and the community.

Can psychedelic drugs be medicine?


Psychiatrists are now considering the benefits of LSD and other psychedelic drugs in treatment. Dr. Sanjay Gupta reports.

What is 'too much' caffeine?


Carl Azuz reports on why consuming too much caffeine is not good for you.

Inside your mind with 'Brain Games'


Jason Silva from National Geographic's hit show "Brain Games" talks about tricks the mind plays that shape our reality.

The best way to brush


CNN's Martha Shade reports on what's the best way to brush your teeth.

How outbreak can start, and end


Dr. Sanjay Gupta describes how "contact tracing" could help stem the tide of an Ebola outbreak.

The healthiest fish to eat?


As our oceans become more polluted, Sally Kohn sits down with Fabien Cousteau to talk about the healthiest fish to eat.

Plastic surgery gone wrong


Dr. Terry Dubrow and Dr. Paul Nassif from E!'s new show "Botched" discuss the risks and complications of plastic surgery.

Ha! Laughter is the best medicine


Scott Weems, author of "Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why," speaks with CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

Twin boys born 24 days apart


Due to a delayed delivery, a set of twins in Massachusetts were born 24 days apart. WCVB's Mary Saladna reports.

Is red meat really bad for you?


CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks with Nina Teicholz, author of "The Big Fat Surprise."

Woman finds three-inch leech in nose


A backpacker finds a leech which had been living in her nose for a month after returning from a trip to South East Asia.

Ebola: Why is it this disease we fear?


Why does Ebola cause more concern than other diseases?

Suspended between life and death


The wards full of patients suspended between life and death

VIDEO: The makeshift 'protection' for Ebola


The BBC's Anne Soy reports from Ghana, where health care workers in one hospital serving Liberian refugees have had to use rain coats instead of proper protective gear against Ebola.

VIDEO: Wine vs doughnut: The hidden calories in booze


Alcohol should have a calorie content label in order to reduce obesity, according to public health doctors.

VIDEO: Becoming a mother at 70 in India


The BBC's Divya Arya reports from India, where women of 60 and 70 are becoming mothers for the first time.

VIDEO: No hugs for Ebola volunteers


The United Nations is appealing for thousands of healthcare workers to volunteer to help in the countries worst affected by Ebola.

VIDEO: Obama: US 'must support health workers'


President Obama says that the United States must support health workers who are going to "the frontline" of the fight against Ebola.

VIDEO: Ebola sufferers 'robbed of dignity'


The BBC's Gabriel Gatehouse reports from Monrovia, the capital of Liberia, on the devastating impact of Ebola upon its people.

VIDEO: Pakistan polio plan 'a disaster'


The polio vaccination programme in Pakistan has been described as ''a disaster'' by monitors reporting to the World Health Organization.

AUDIO: Ebola health worker's audio diary fears


Dr Geraldine O'Hara, an infectious diseases specialist from Huddersfield, has recorded a series of audio diaries while she is in Sierra Leone.

A South Sudanese psychiatrist's Herculean task


Meet one of only two psychiatrists in war-ravaged South Sudan

Can you cheat your way to fitness?


Is it really possible to get in shape by just doing the chores

Ebola: The right to refuse to treat


A doctor's right to refuse to treat

The taboo of menstruating in India


The taboo of menstruation in India

Tribute to FGM 'warrior' Efua Dorkenoo


The woman who made the world listen

Ebola crisis: 'We need help, serious help'


Sierra Leone sailor asks for international help to end the epidemic

10 things you may not know about laughter


Things you may not have known about being amused

Six surprising Ebola numbers


Six surprising figures from the frontline

To walk again - the people behind the story


The project that enabled a paralysed man to walk again

Ebola: WHO under fire over response to epidemic


Global health body under fire over Ebola

Ebola crisis: How Nigeria's Dr Adadevoh fought the virus


How one doctor saved Nigeria from a catastrophe

Nigeria fights back against Ebola


Nigeria's lesson in how to prevent an outbreak

Ebola: How many people have died?


Why we don't know how many people Ebola has killed

Ebola cases 'slowing in Liberia'


The WHO says Liberia, the country hardest hit in the Ebola outbreak, has seen a decline in infections, but warns the crisis is far from over.

Google developing a cancer detector


Google is attempting to diagnose cancers, heart attack risks and other ailments with a system that combines nanoparticles and a wrist-worn sensor.

Drinking milk 'may not protect bones'


Drinking large amounts of milk may not lower the risk of bone fractures, a study in the British Medical Journal suggests.

Body has 'rush hour' transformation


Two "rush hours" every day profoundly change the way the body works, scientists have discovered.

Cancer-killing cells made in the lab


Scientists from Harvard Medical School have discovered a way of turning stem cells into killing machines to fight brain cancer.

US Ebola nurse 'plans legal action'


A US nurse held in quarantine in New Jersey after treating Ebola patients in West Africa says she will challenge her confinement in court.

First transplant of 'dead' heart


Surgeons in Australia say they have performed the first heart transplant using a "dead heart".

Later sunsets 'make kids more active'


Moving the clocks forward by one extra hour all year could lead to children getting two more minutes of exercise every day, say UK researchers.

'Nine million have TB' - WHO report


The World Health Organization revises its estimate as to how many people have tuberculosis up by 500,000, in its latest report into the killer disease.

Male genes linked to early death


The male Y sex chromosome may have a role in prolonging men's lives and fighting cancer, according to a study.

Man walks again after transplant


A paralysed man becomes the first in the world to walk again following a pioneering therapy which involved transplanting cells from his nose into his severed spinal cord.

Ebola blood-therapy team set up


An international team of scientists is set up to determine the effectiveness of using the blood of Ebola-survivors as a treatment.

Scans reveal cause of winter blues


Scientists say they have identified the underlying reason why some people are prone to the winter blues, or seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

Fly genes hold clue to human illness


Scientists sequence the entire genome of the common housefly in a bid to find cures for human diseases.

Life Alert® is a registered trademark of Life Alert Emergency Response, Inc.
© Copyright © 1987–, Life Alert, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.