Health News
12/19/2014

European court rules obesity can be a disability


FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2007 file photo, an overweight person eats at a bench in London. The European Court of Justice says obesity can be a disability, a ruling that could have consequences for employers across the continent. The court ruled Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014 in the case of a Danish child-minder who says he was unfairly fired for being fat. The court said if obesity hinders "full and effective participation in professional life,” it could count as a disability. Discrimination on the grounds of disability is illegal under European Union law. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, file)LONDON (AP) — Obesity can be a disability, the European Court of Justice ruled Thursday — a decision that could have widespread consequences across the 28-nation bloc for the way in which employers deal with severely overweight staff.



EU court says obesity can be disability


Karsten Kaltoft arrives on December 18, 2014 at the workers' union Fag og Arbejde (FOA) in Copenhagen to hear the judgment after he claimed he was sacked by his local authority for being unable to perform his duties, because of his sizeLuxembourg (AFP) - The European Union's highest court ruled Thursday that obesity can be considered a "disability" if it hinders an overweight person's performance at work.



Knee pain may run in the family


By Shereen Lehman (Reuters Health) - People whose parents had a total knee replacement due to osteoarthritis are more than twice as likely to develop knee pain in midlife as those with no family history of knee surgery, according to a new study. The Australian authors say the link between parents and adult children shows that genetics may have much to do with knee problems and the pain that goes with them. “It was abundantly clear that genes were a strong contributor to risk of osteoarthritis but there had been limited success in finding these genes,” said Dr. ...

Report: Radiation leak at nuclear dump was small


CARLSBAD, N.M. (AP) — A final report by independent researchers shows the radiation leak from the federal government's underground nuclear waste repository in southern New Mexico was small and localized.

Heart experts warn of air pollution dangers


By Janice Neumann (Reuters Health) - Air pollution should be one of the avoidable heart risk factors - just like smoking and excess fat - that doctors warn patients to steer clear of, according to a new statement from 20 heart experts. Citing pollution’s heavy toll on cardiovascular health, the panel urges people to take steps to protect themselves from breathing heavy traffic fumes or industrial air pollution whenever possible, and public officials to pass laws to reduce air pollution. ...

Colorado awards $8 million to study medical marijuana uses


A marijuana leaf is displayed at Canna Pi medical marijuana dispensary in SeattleBy Keith Coffman DENVER (Reuters) - (Corrects paragraph 7 in Dec. 17 story to clarify that funding comes from patient registration fees, not taxes on medical marijuana sales) Colorado health officials awarded $8 million in research grants on Wednesday to study the use of medical marijuana in the treatment of symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease, childhood epilepsy and post-traumatic stress disorder. Colorado was one of the first two U.S. states to legalize recreational pot use, and it is among 23 states and the District of Columbia that permit use of the drug for medicinal purposes. ...



Ebola: 11th Sierra Leone doctor dies; fire destroys supplies


In this Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014 file photo, a healthcare worker dons protective gear before entering an Ebola treatment center in the west of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Dr. Brima Kargbo, Sierra Leone's chief medical officer, confirmed Thursday Dec. 18, 2014, that Dr. Victor Willoughby died earlier in the day after being tested positive for Ebola on Saturday, the 11th doctor in the country to die from the disease that is ravaging West Africa. (AP Photo/Michael Duff, FILE)FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — One of Sierra Leone's most senior physicians died Thursday from Ebola, the 11th doctor in the country to succumb to the disease, a health official said.



The One New Year's Resolution Every Person Living With Chronic Illness Should Make


The One New Year's Resolution Every Person Living With Chronic Illness Should MakeThere is a part of us that can't help but face a new year with dread as we consider the fact we will continue to battle with our illness and the many dramas that ensue as a result. Yet for most of us, when Jan. 1 rolls around we want to believe that this coming year will be better. Hope is powerful stuff, and whether we like it or not, consider...



Colombia village's 'curse' could hold Alzheimer's cure


The World Health Organisation says approximately 500,000 people die each year because they have Alzheimer'sYarumal, a Colombian village perched in the Andes Mountains, has a high incidence of a genetic mutation that predisposes its population to Alzheimer's -- a bleak heritage that scientists now hope could help lead to a treatment to prevent the disease. Jairo is just 49 but his brain has already been gnawed away by Alzheimer's, a disease caused by toxic proteins that destroy brain cells, leading to memory loss and death. Inherited from the village's European ancestors, the "paisa" genetic mutation -- named for the residents of the Colombian province of Antioquia -- causes a devastating form of early-onset Alzheimer's.



Why I Don't Miss My Breasts Anymore


Why I Don't Miss My Breasts AnymoreShortly after my double mastectomy 12 years ago, my oncologist asked me how I felt about losing my breasts. I told him I was sad and afraid I would feel this way forever."How you feel will keep evolving," he said. It turns out that was one of the truest things anyone told me about losing body parts, although, at the time, I couldn't imagine...



4 Ways To Get Firm And Cute By Lowering Firmicutes


4 Ways To Get Firm And Cute By Lowering FirmicutesIn "The Big Lie of Obesity" I showed weight gain was not from laziness or indulgence, but from your body reacting to stressors. In response to stress, your body will store food to prepare for famine, thus causing weight gain. Some stressors are obvious, but many are as silent and invisible as the bacteria in our intestines.In a startling study,...



With stimulant, kids with ADHD less likely to injure themselves


By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) – When kids with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are taking methylphenidate, a stimulant drug, they are less likely to end up in the emergency room with a trauma injury, a new study finds. “Previous studies show that patients with ADHD have a higher tendency of sustaining trauma and other injuries, requiring emergency department (ED) attendance,” said senior author Ian C.K. Wong of the Centre for Safe Medication Practice and Research department of pharmacology and pharmacy in Hong Kong. ...

New GSK shingles vaccine may challenge Merck after strong test data


A British Airways airplane flies past a signage for pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKlein in LondonBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - An experimental shingles vaccine from GlaxoSmithKline has produced impressive results in a late-stage study, giving the group's expanding vaccine unit a potential $1 billion boost. The data suggests the British company's new shot could be a strong competitor for Merck & Co's established vaccine Zostavax, which is currently the only product on the market. GSK's vaccine, known as HZ/su, reduced the risk of shingles by 97. ...



Irish face new abortion row over brain-dead woman


FILE - A Saturday, July 6, 2013 file photo showing Stephen and Pauline O'Brien, foreground, holding Catholic rosary beads as they march through Ireland's capital, Dublin, in an anti-abortion protest. Ireland is debating its constitutional ban on abortion again because of a case involving a brain-dead pregnant woman on life support. Irish media reported Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014, that family members want to turn off the woman’s life support systems but doctors are refusing because the law requires them to defend the right to life of her 16-week-old fetus. Fetuses typically cannot survive outside the womb until around 24 weeks. (AP Photo/Shawn Pogatchnik, File)DUBLIN (AP) — Ireland is debating its ban on abortion again as doctors keep a brain-dead pregnant woman on life support, awaiting a judge's verdict on what do to with the living fetus.



Cambodian villagers angry over HIV outbreak


PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) — Cambodia's prime minister appealed Thursday to villagers in northwestern Cambodia not to lynch an unlicensed medical practitioner who they suspect caused more than 100 people to become infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

GE to launch breakdancing documentary for streaming devices


The logo of US conglomerate General Electric is pictured at the company's site in BelfortBy Jennifer Saba (Reuters) - U.S. industrial conglomerate General Electric Co plans to release its first feature film through video streaming devices like Roku and Apple TV in a marketing effort that raises the bar for sponsored content. "Shake the Dust" is a documentary about breakdancing and how the movement has united people across the world. Executive-produced by the rap star Nas, it will make its debut on December 24 through a partnership with the music video platform Vevo. ...



Armed groups recruit 10,000 child soldiers in Central African Republic – NGO


A mother holds her child while attempting to take cover as repeated gun shots are heard close to Miskine district during continuing sectarian violence in the capital BanguiDAKAR (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Up to 10,000 children have been recruited by armed groups during the conflict in the Central African Republic (CAR) despite a U.N.-backed peacekeeping presence, the number rising sharply in the past two years, Save the Children said on Thursday. Some children were abducted or forced to join such groups, while others signed up for food, clothing, money and protection, the international children's charity said in a news release. Many joined up under pressure from peers or parents, to protect their community or avenge dead relatives, it said. ...



Obesity can be deemed a disability at work: EU court


Women sit on bench in New YorkBy Julia Fioretti BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Europe's top court ruled on Thursday that obese people can be considered as disabled, but stopped short of saying that obesity was a condition that needed specific protection under European anti-discrimination laws. The landmark decision will be closely read by European employers and means that companies might have to provide greater support to obese staff. The case was instigated by a Danish court, which wanted guidance over a complaint of unfair dismissal brought by a child-minder who was sacked by a local authority. ...



Going the Distance: Passion Propels Cyclist Despite Rare Genetic Condition


Going the Distance: Passion Propels Cyclist Despite Rare Genetic ConditionWhat if your passion preserved your life? Would you think about it differently, even to the point of making it a priority? For Daryl Kunz, whose passion for 20 years has been cycling, these questions are more than rhetorical musings.Every year, Daryl covers thousands of miles and competes in ultra-distance races in which he's won a handful of...



U.N. launches 2015 Syria appeal, focuses on helping refugees' host nations


Syrian refugees play at the Al Zaatari refugee camp in the Jordanian city of MafraqBy Magdalena Mis LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The United Nations called on Thursday for more than $8.4 billion to help nearly 18 million people in need in Syria, wrecked by civil war, and across the region in 2015. As well as calling for cash for essential humanitarian aid for millions of Syrians inside and outside their homeland, the annual appeal included for the first time development plans to help neighboring countries hosting Syrian refugees. Launched at a donor meeting in Berlin, the 2015 appeal includes $2. ...



EU's top court opens door to some stem cell patents


Piece of three-dimensional bone structure obtained from the own adipose stem cells of a patient is seen at Brussels' St Luc HospitalBy Robert-Jan Bartunek and Ben Hirschler BRUSSELS/LONDON (Reuters) - Europe's top court has opened the door to certain stem cell patents in the European Union by ruling that an organism incapable of developing into a human being is not a human embryo and may be patented. Thursday's judgment by the European Court of Justice was made following a case brought in Britain by U.S. company International Stem Cell Corporation over whether it could patent processes covering the use of human egg cells. ...



Weekly weigh-ins associated with weight loss: study


Weekly weigh-ins associated with weight loss: studyThe more frequently dieters step on the scale, the more weight they lose, according to a new study from the Cornell Food & Brand Lab.



Eli Lilly and Adocia agree to develop fast-acting insulin


By Natalie Huet PARIS (Reuters) - U.S. drugmaker Eli Lilly and French biotech Adocia said on Friday they agreed a worldwide licensing partnership to develop an ultra-rapid insulin to treat patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. The fast-acting insulin, called BioChaperone Lispro, is currently in early-stage Phase Ib studies and aims to control glucose levels better during and after meals. ...

Britain could allow women in army close combat role from 2016


Soldiers of the British Army's 2 Signals Regiment parade marking completion of the unit's eight month Afghanistan tour of duty, in YorkLONDON (Reuters) - Britain might allow women to fight in close combat roles for the first time from 2016, the defence secretary said on Friday, in a move that would bring the British army into line with some other Western forces. Britain's army currently allows women to serve on the front line, but does not let them join units whose main function is to engage and kill the enemy. The United States, Australia and Canada are among those nations which already have women in close combat roles. ...



Double blow for Roche as Alzheimer's, breast cancer studies fail


The logo of Swiss pharmaceutical company Roche is seen at a plant in the central Swiss village of RotkreuzBy Silke Koltrowitz and Ben Hirschler ZURICH/LONDON (Reuters) - Roche said on Friday it would discontinue a late-stage study of an experimental Alzheimer's drug after it failed to prove effective, underlining the difficulty of treating the memory-robbing disease. The Swiss drugmaker also said a breast cancer trial had failed to demonstrate the benefit of adding its new drug Kadcyla to treatment programs. Although both projects were relatively risky, the news is a double blow for Roche, which in recent years has boasted one of the most productive research pipelines in the industry. ...



Japanese scientist resigns over stem cell scandal


The government-backed Riken Institute verification experiment team leader Shinichi Aizawa (right C, standing) tells journalists in Tokyo on December 19, 2014, that a so-called ground breaking study on stem cells cannot be reproducedA researcher embroiled in a fabrication scandal that has rocked Japan's scientific establishment said Friday she would resign after failing to reproduce results of what was once billed as a ground-breaking study on stem cells. Haruko Obokata said she was dismayed that new laboratory tests have not been able to repeat her experiments, which she had claimed showed the successful conversion of an adult cell into a stem cell-like state. Her resignation came as Japan's Riken Institute formally announced that so-called "STAP" cells cannot be recreated, apparently drawing a line under the controversial study. "We have conducted verification experiments but can't repeat the STAP phenomenon," team leader Shinichi Aizawa told a nationally broadcast news conference.



Sierra Leone's leading doctor dies of Ebola


FREETOWN (Reuters) - Sierra Leone's leading doctor died of Ebola on Thursday, hours after the arrival in the country of an experimental drug that could have been used to treat him, the government's chief medical officer said. Victor Willoughby was diagnosed with Ebola last week after he treated a man with organ-related problems. The patient, a senior banker, was later diagnosed with Ebola and has since died. The drug, ZMab, was transported in frozen form on a Brussels Airlines flight that arrived overnight. ...

Minnesota links caramel apples, 2 listeria deaths


MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Minnesota health officials say two people died and two others became ill this fall after eating prepackaged caramel apples contaminated with the bacterium listeria.

Disgraced Japan researcher fails to replicate 'game changing' stem cell results


Haruko Obokata, a researcher at semi-governmental research institute RIKEN, lowers her eyes during a news conference in OsakaBy Elaine Lies TOKYO (Reuters) - A disgraced Japanese researcher has failed to replicate results hailed as a potential breakthrough in stem-cell treatment and efforts to do so will be abandoned, officials at her research institute said on Friday. The scandal involving the research, which detailed simple ways to reprogram mature cells back to an embryonic-like state, eventually led to the retraction of papers published in the influential journal Nature and tarnished the reputation of Japanese scientific research. ...



With Cuba decision, Obama hands Hillary Clinton a gift


U.S. Secretary of State Clinton listens to U.S. President Obama speak during a meeting with members of his cabinet in WashingtonBy Steve Holland WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Potential 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton knows a political gift when she sees one. She was quick to embrace the step this week when President Barack Obama, a fellow Democrat no longer having to face an electorate, relaxed U.S. policy toward Cuba. While assailed by Republicans opposed to restoring ties with the communist-led island, the action has the power to solidify support for Democrats among increasingly influential Latino voters and appeal to voters in farm states like Iowa eager to do business in Havana. ...



Neighboring states challenge Colorado pot laws in top U.S. court


Danielle Hackett prepares marijuana buds for sale at BotanaCare in Northglenn, ColoradoBy Daniel Wallis DENVER (Reuters) - Nebraska and Oklahoma challenged neighboring Colorado's recreational marijuana laws in the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday amid complaints its pot was seeping across their borders, and Colorado vowed to defend its laws. Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning said he joined Oklahoma in filing the action against Colorado, where voters chose to legalize recreational marijuana in a landmark 2012 vote even as the drug remains federally outlawed. ...



Dutch PM agrees to change health bill to avoid government collapse


Dutch Prime Minister Rutte speaks during a joint news conference with Malaysia's Prime Minister Najib in PutrajayaBy Anthony Deutsch AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte said in a letter to parliament late Thursday that his party would revise a health bill that was blocked in the senate, potentially staving off the collapse of his fragile center-right coalition government. Earlier on Thursday Rutte was forced to pull out of an EU summit to deal with a mounting political crisis over the bill, which has highlighted a deep divide between his Liberal party and the left-of-center Labour, with which he shares power. ...



U.S. Republicans look for ways to block normal ties with Cuba


Senator Marco Rubio, (R-FL) listens to Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, (R-FL), during a press conference in MiamiBy Roberta Rampton and Patricia Zengerle WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Republicans in Congress searched on Thursday for a strategy to sink or at least slow President Barack Obama's plan to normalize U.S. relations with Cuba, drawing a shrug from the White House. They floated ideas to fight the Democrat Obama's moves to forge ties and expand commercial ties with the communist-led island after half a century of hostility. Their ideas included denying funds to reopen a Havana embassy and blocking the confirmation of a U.S. ambassador. ...



What to Know About the European Union's Obesity Ruling


What to Know About the European Union's Obesity RulingEurope's highest court ruled today that obesity can, under certain circumstances, be considered a disability, taking a step forward against obesity discrimination, experts say.The European Court of Justice heard the case of a child-care worker identified in the ruling as "Mr. Kaltoft," who claimed he had been fired from his job because of his weight. The court ruled that although obesity was itself not a disability, it can cause certain hindrances that can be considered a disability. ...



Wisconsin girls in Slenderman case ruled competent to stand trial


By Brendan O'Brien WAUKESHA, Wisc. (Reuters) - Two Wisconsin girls accused of luring a classmate into the woods and repeatedly stabbing her to please a fictional Internet character named Slenderman are competent to stand trial, a judge ruled on Thursday. Anissa Weier and Morgan Geyser, both 12 at the time, were charged as adults with first-degree attempted homicide in the attack on their classmate the morning after a sleepover in May in Waukesha, a suburb west of Milwaukee. ...

'Tis the Season to Be Light


'Tis the Season to Be LightThis can be a very heavy time of year. We put on heavy clothing to go out into heavy snow. We drive through heavy traffic to carry our heavy boxes of presents into a packed house of family where we share a heavy meal before heading home for a heavy night's sleep. And yet, 'tis the season to be jolly?The holidays can be a time of extreme...



Iowa Spa 'Makeover' Lifts This 4-Year-Old Cancer Patient


Girl gets full "red carpet" treatment that she wants every day.

Mansplainer Series: History of the Tampon


Believe it or not, tampons have been around for thousands of years! From ancient Egypt to depression-era Denver, Colorado, the story of how they came to be spans continents and centuries.

White House does not dismiss idea of Castro visit


Cuba's President Raul Castro attends a meeting of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) leaders summit at the Revolution Palace in HavanaBy Roberta Rampton WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The White House does not dismiss the possibility of an eventual, precedent-shattering visit to Washington by Cuban President Raul Castro as part of President Barack Obama's plans to normalize relations with Havana. "I wouldn't rule out a visit from President Castro," White House spokesman Josh Earnest told reporters on Thursday, a day after the two governments announced they would restore ties and open embassies after half a century of hostility. U.S. ...



Teen contraband cigarette use linked to other drugs


By Kathryn Doyle Reuters Health - Compared to those who don’t smoke illicit tobacco, kids who do are more likely to try other illegal drugs like cocaine, heroin and amphetamines, according to a recent Canadian study. The researchers used survey data from one point in time, so they can’t say that smoking illegal cigarettes leads to drug use, only that the two often coincide and that’s enough to warrant stronger tobacco control policies. “The concern for us is that contraband tobacco may be a gateway to other drugs, but we cannot infer causality,” said coauthor Mesbah F. ...

This is your brain on crafting


Her brother's sudden death in 2004 hit Sarah Huerta hard.

Can you reverse Alzheimer's?


Exercising, getting enough sleep, cutting down on processed foods and other habits may actually reverse the early signs of Alzheimer's.

Helping kids kick cancer fear


For 12 years, Rabbi Elimelech Goldberg worked at a camp for children battling cancer.

Predicting the flu so you avoid it


Imagine being able to predict when they flu might strike your town, a bit like how meteorologists predict when a storm is heading your way. Think about what companies or hospitals or even you could do to prepare.

Disabled get buff with fitness guru


Ned Norton was working as a fitness trainer for Olympic athletes and bodybuilders when a young man with a spinal cord injury asked him for help.

Go ahead, lie about your age


People who feel younger at heart live longer. A new study shows those people are among a group who have a lower death rate, compared with those who felt their age or older.

This is your brain on crafting


Her brother's sudden death in 2004 hit Sarah Huerta hard.

Dozens sick from hockey rink poisoning


A carbon monoxide leak at a Wisconsin ice rink left 81 people hospitalized. CNN affiliate WISC has the details.

A one-woman Ebola hospital


22-year-old Fatu Kekula nursed her mother, father and sister through Ebola using trash bags to protect herself.

Crab's blood could save your life


Hundreds of thousands of horseshoe crabs are captured each year for their incredible blue blood.

The monster that took my son


A week before Cole died, I promised him he would do "something big" someday. For two years, I have been fighting to keep that promise.

The debilitating outbreak sweeping the Americas


Its name means "bending over in pain." It has no treatment or vaccine. Its symptoms resemble Dengue fever. And it has infected more than 1 million people -- 155 of them fatally -- since spreading to the Americas one year ago.

Survey: Teen drinking, drug use down


Teens might be shedding their rebellious reputations: A survey says they're doing fewer drugs, drinking and smoking less. But E-cigarette use is up.

Senate confirms new surgeon general


The Senate confirmed Vivek Murthy as surgeon general on Monday night as Democrats -- in the final days of their majority control of the chamber -- overcame stiff opposition from the National Rifle Association.

Chickenpox keeps Angelina Jolie from premiere


Angelina Jolie delivered a special message to fans in a video posted to YouTube: She's got chickenpox.

How a hockey player put pain on ice


Greg Ozubko's arthritis pain was so intense he couldn't walk. Now he's playing goalie -- all because of an NHL team with a terrible record.

Ebola fighter coming to U.S. to study


A young Liberian woman who saved three of her relatives by nursing them back to health after they contracted the Ebola virus is coming to the United States to finish her nursing degree.

Exposure to common household chemicals may cause IQ drop


A chemical that's in a lot of household products may be hurting children's IQ's.

Dozens sick from hockey rink poisoning


A carbon monoxide leak at a Wisconsin ice rink left 81 people hospitalized. CNN affiliate WISC has the details.

Yoga tips to stress less this season


These yoga techniques are a real gift for those of you who hope to keep feeling festive in what can be a stressful season.

Mediterranean diet tied to a longer life


Eating a Mediterranean diet may be your key to living longer, a new study shows. The diet is rich in vegetables, fruits, nuts, beans and peas, unrefined grains, olive oil and fish.

Learn to live with it: Becoming stress-free


People believe that stress comes from external sources. That's why they're so stressed, author A. Parthasarathy writes.

Reduce your risk of dementia


The statistics, unfortunately, are staggering. An estimated 44 million people worldwide are living with dementia, according to a report released Tuesday by Alzheimer's Disease International.

Hallucinogens to treat depression?


Psychedelic drugs are being researched as a potential treatment for conditions ranging from anxiety to tobacco and alcohol addiction.

Lack of sleep may shrink your brain


Can sleep deprivation affect the size of your brain? It's possible, a recent study published in an online issue of Neurology suggests.

Mental illness: Time to break taboo


350 million people around the world suffer from depression. Why aren't we talking about it?

Schizophrenia is eight disorders


What we know -- and psychiatrists have diagnosed for decades -- as schizophrenia may really be eight separate diseases, research published in The American Journal of Psychiatry suggests.

Adam's story: 63 pills a day


The modest clinic on Milpas Street in laid-back Santa Barbara, California, was well known to patients seeking powerful pain medication.

How he became an Ironman


Joe Van Veldhuizen was 19 miles into his first Ironman. He had two hours left to complete the race, and only three miles to go in the 26.2-mile marathon.

Predicting the flu so you can avoid it


Imagine being able to predict when the flu might strike your town, a bit like how meteorologists predict when a storm is heading your way.

Flu shot less helpful, but still key


This year's flu vaccine is not as effective against the current strain of the influenza virus because the virus has mutated, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in an advisory to doctors.

Vintage cold and flu ads



A form of sugar helps twin girls


Hugh and Chris Hempel welcomed beautiful twin girls into the world in 2004. Since the girls were about two, the whole family has been fighting to treat the twins' rare genetic condition.

Electrodes in brain to treat Tourette's


A pioneering procedure might be the answer to ending the misery of Tourette's syndrome.

The next medicinal marijuana?


Ayahuasca is a psychedelic drink that's attracting more and more tourists to the remote corners of the Amazon. But is it a drug, or is it medicine?

Music helps your brain


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us why music therapy is good for the brain and how it can help us live to 100.

Live to 100: Laugh more


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us how laughing more can help us live to 100.

Eat chocolate. Yes, chocolate.


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tell us how eating certain types of chocolate can help us live to 100.

Visit to Sanjay Gupta's past


Dr. Sanjay Gupta traveled from Pakistan to Michigan to discover his family's roots. Here's what he learned along the way.

How to really lose weight


From what to eat to how much to exercise, Elizabeth Cohen explains what you really need to do to lose weight.

Keeping young athletes safe


CNN's Holly Firfer reports on ways parents can keep their student athletes safe.

Lab holds 2,000 brains


The University of Miami Brain Endowment Bank provides brain tissues to researchers to study various brain disorders.

Smart toothbrush tracks brushing


This Bluetooth enabled toothbrush coaches you while you brush and tracks your progress through a smartphone app.

Farming in the city


This urban farm supplies fresh produce to food deserts, but also offers other benefits to individuals and the community.

Can psychedelic drugs be medicine?


Psychiatrists are now considering the benefits of LSD and other psychedelic drugs in treatment. Dr. Sanjay Gupta reports.

What is 'too much' caffeine?


Carl Azuz reports on why consuming too much caffeine is not good for you.

Inside your mind with 'Brain Games'


Jason Silva from National Geographic's hit show "Brain Games" talks about tricks the mind plays that shape our reality.

The best way to brush


CNN's Martha Shade reports on what's the best way to brush your teeth.

How outbreak can start, and end


Dr. Sanjay Gupta describes how "contact tracing" could help stem the tide of an Ebola outbreak.

The healthiest fish to eat?


As our oceans become more polluted, Sally Kohn sits down with Fabien Cousteau to talk about the healthiest fish to eat.

Plastic surgery gone wrong


Dr. Terry Dubrow and Dr. Paul Nassif from E!'s new show "Botched" discuss the risks and complications of plastic surgery.

Ha! Laughter is the best medicine


Scott Weems, author of "Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why," speaks with CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

Twin boys born 24 days apart


Due to a delayed delivery, a set of twins in Massachusetts were born 24 days apart. WCVB's Mary Saladna reports.

Is red meat really bad for you?


CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks with Nina Teicholz, author of "The Big Fat Surprise."

This is your body on weed


Dr. Sanjay Gupta explains how marijuana affects the brain and how pot can be used to treat certain conditions.

Teacher eats only McDonald's


A teacher only eats McDonald's for 90 days, and LOSES 37 pounds. KCCI reports.

World's most dangerous workout?


Is the "sport of fitness" the world's most dangerous workout? CNN's Jarrett Bellini asks CrossFitters and gives it a go.

Go ahead, lie about your age


People who feel younger at heart live longer. A new study shows those people are among a group who have a lower death rate, compared with those who felt their age or older.

5 ways to fat-proof your home


Here simple ways to keep your home food-temptation free. This works for even the most weak-willed among us.

The battle for control of the cigarette packet


How health warnings are changing cigarette packet design

VIDEO: Visiting the doctor via the internet


A state-of-the-art clinic in Denmark is set to make dramatic changes to the relationship between doctor and patient.

VIDEO: How malaria deaths were halved


The BBC's David Shukman looks at how a "staggering rate" of success against the fight against malaria has been achieved.

VIDEO: PNG: Winning the fight against malaria


Fariba Sahr-aei reports from community villages in Papua New Guinea about the defeat of malaria and the journey to eliminating the disease entirely.

VIDEO: WHO: 'Ebola running ahead of us'


The head of the World Health Organization has told the BBC that the Ebola virus is still "running ahead" of efforts to contain it.

VIDEO: SWAN children given new hope


New hope for children known as SWANs (syndrome without a name) as technology developed in Cambridge aims to dramatically increase that rate of diagnosis.

VIDEO: Tackling HIV in Myanmar


As access to Myanmar increases, is the country left more vulnerable to diseases such as HIV/Aids? Nick Wood reports.

AUDIO: HIV virus 'becoming less dangerous'


A new study suggests HIV is becoming less infectious and deadly as it evolves, but virologist Prof David Dausey says caution has to be observed.

VIDEO: Where did Aids come from?


World Aids day is being marked by a series of events across the globe. The virus which causes Aids - HIV - was first identified by scientists more than 30 years ago.

Victims of a craze for cosmetic surgery


Bitter regrets in one of the world's cosmetic surgery capitals

Atul Gawande: What ails India's public health system


Atul Gawande on what ails India's public health system

How to beat malaria


How are we winning the fight against the disease?

Inside the 'world's most dangerous' hospital


Inside the 'world's most dangerous' hospital

Living longer in Lovely Hill


Diet, exercise and faith bring old age joy to California community

NHS should welcome 'citizen whistleblowers'


Why the NHS should listen to 'citizen whistleblowers'

HIV: Why is virus so 'successful'?


Why is virus so 'successful'?

How the West is cutting teen pregnancy


Is it true that one in three US teenagers gets pregnant?

World Aids Day: Overcoming fear of taking ARVs


Overcoming fear and stigma to take anti-Aids drugs

Pakistan sex taboos challenged by TV show


The TV phone-in giving a voice to frustrated Pakistanis

Tracing the Ebola outbreak


Tracking first Ebola victim and and how virus spread

Obesity 'could be a disability' - EU


Obesity can constitute a disability if the health effects have an impact on people's working lives, the European Court of Justice rules.

Autism link to air pollution raised


A link between autism and air pollution during pregnancy has been suggested by scientists.

Drug allergy: Culprit protein found


Scientists uncover a single protein that could be responsible for drug allergies, on the surface of cells.

Rules for babies 'from three people'


The rules for creating babies from three people - which state only two would be classed as parents - have been announced by the UK government.

S Leone houses searched for Ebola


Sierra Leone starts house-to-house searches in the capital Freetown to find hidden cases of Ebola, at the same time restricting shop opening hours.

E-cigarettes 'can help smokers quit'


E-cigarettes can help smokers stop or reduce their habit, a Cochrane review has found.

Fat 'breathed out' of body via lungs


Fat can be breathed out as well as burned off as you lose weight, biochemists who have studied metabolism at a microscopic level say.

Yoga may protect heart, study finds


Doing yoga may be a good way to protect against heart disease, particularly if you cannot do more vigorous exercise, research suggests.

Ebola serum supply reaches Liberia


Liberia begins treating Ebola patients with serum therapy - a treatment made from the blood of recovered survivors.

Shift workers 'sicker and fatter'


People working shifts in England have higher rates of obesity and long-term health problems than those doing normal hours, according to a major study.

Allergy laws enforced in restaurants


Restaurants and takeaways across Europe will be required by law to tell customers if their food contains ingredients known to trigger allergies.

Poor hygiene 'deadly in childbirth'


Leading health experts say sanitation facilities in birth clinics need to be given greater priority in low-income countries to prevent maternal and newborn deaths.

Memory lapses may signal stroke risk


People with memory problems who have a university education could be at greater risk of a stroke, suggests research from the Netherlands.

Ebola vaccine trial 'interrupted'


The clinical trial of an Ebola vaccine in Switzerland has been interrupted after some patients complained of joint pains in their hands and feet.

Superbugs to kill 'more than cancer'


Drug resistant infections will kill an extra 10 million people a year worldwide by 2050 unless action is taken, a study says.

Superbug found in Rio Olympic waters


Researchers in Brazil discover "super-bacteria" in the sea waters where sailing and windsurfing events will be held during the 2016 Olympics.

Cardiff surgeons' musical medicine


Stayin' Alive by the Bee Gees or Another One Bites the Dust by Queen? A study by Cardiff surgeons looks at the songs which could work best in the operating theatre.

Huddles 'help children's hospital care'


Small measures that could boost children's care

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