Health News
9/2/2014

GE, IMI, buyout funds line up bids for Italy's Petrolvalves: sources


The logo of US conglomerate General Electric is pictured at the company's site in BelfortBy Pamela Barbaglia LONDON (Reuters) - General Electric , UK engineer IMI and buyout funds CVC and First Reserve are preparing binding offers for Italian valve maker Petrolvalves, sources familiar with the situation said. Industry rival Emerson Electric Co , described by one source as a "motivated" bidder, could also participate in the final round of the auction, launched earlier this year by the Candiani family which wants to sell its majority stake. The bidding process is complicated by the fact that another Italian family, the Lualdi, owns 40 percent of the company and is reluctant to sell. Petrolvalves, which was established in 1956 and generates the bulk of its revenues overseas, has set a deadline for binding offers towards the end of September in an attempt to sign a deal later this year, the sources said.



Texas voter ID trial opens in U.S. court


a lawsuit against the Voter ID billDistrict Court in Corpus Christi stems from a battle over stringent voter ID measures signed into law by Texas Governor Rick Perry, a Republican, in 2011. The law requires voters to present a photo ID such as a concealed handgun license or driver's license, but it excludes student IDs as invalid. "Although Texas has yet to identify a single instance of in-person voter fraud, the state nevertheless insists that a racially discriminatory photo ID law is necessary to prevent it," said Natasha Korgaonkar, assistant counsel with the civil rights group NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.



Obama briefed on Ebola outbreak, CDC efforts: White House


WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama has been briefed by top U.S. health officials about the ongoing Ebola outbreak in Africa, the White House said on Tuesday. White House spokesman Josh Earnest, in a briefing with reporters, said Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Tom Frieden has been providing regular updates on the CDC's effort to help deal with the epidemic. Earlier on Tuesday, the CDC cautioned that the outbreak is threatening the stability of affected and neighboring countries in West Africa and urgent action is needed to bring it under control. ...

Ebola threatens food security in West Africa: FAO


Health workers wearing protective clothing prepare themselves before to carrying an abandoned dead body presenting with Ebola symptoms at Duwala market in MonroviaBy Isla Binnie and Emma Farge ROME/DAKAR (Reuters) - The world's worst Ebola epidemic has endangered harvests and sent food prices soaring in West Africa, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) said on Tuesday, warning the problem would intensify in coming months. The FAO issued a special alert for Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, the three countries most affected by the outbreak, which has killed at least 1,550 people since the virus was detected in the remote jungles of southeastern Guinea in March. Restrictions on people's movements and the establishment of quarantine zones to contain the spread of the hemorrhagic fever have led to panic buying, food shortages and price hikes in countries ill-prepared to absorb the shock. "In the three countries severely affected by Ebola, the agriculture and food security situation is really deteriorating," said Vincent Martin, head of an FAO unit in Dakar that is coordinating the agency's response.



Report blames coal ash for cancers at Pennsylvania prison


By David DeKok HARRISBURG Pa. (Reuters) - A high rate of cancer among inmates at a southwestern Pennsylvania prison is linked to a nearby coal ash dump, and the correctional facility should be closed down, according to a report made public on Tuesday. Eleven prisoners died of cancer from 2010 through 2013, and six others have been diagnosed with cancer at the State Correctional Institution Fayette, said the report, released by the Abolitionist Law Center, a public interest law firm based in Pittsburgh, and the Human Rights Coalition, a national prison reform group. SCI Fayette has a higher inmate death rate than all but two other prisons in the state, both of which have high geriatric populations, it said. A 12-month investigation found that blowing coal ash was the most likely cause of the inmate cancers as well as other illnesses at the facility.

For My Husband Harlan on Our Second Anniversary


For My Husband Harlan on Our Second AnniversaryHarlan and Jennifer, August 25, 2012"Your naked body should only belong to those who fall in love with your naked soul." -- Charlie Chaplin in a letter to his daughter GeraldineLove me and live with me. Take from me, give to me.Let me be all things to you.



Double mastectomy doesn't boost cancer survival rates: study


A breast cancer patient leaves hospital after her latest radiotherapy session, in Tehran, Iran, on December 22, 2013Women fighting cancer in one breast don't benefit from having both breasts removed, according to new research out Tuesday, that found long-term survival was equivalent after targeted surgery plus radiation. Hollywood star Angelina Jolie famously announced last year she had a double mastectomy to reduce her risk of one day developing breast cancer, because she has a genetic mutation that substantially increases breast cancer risk. It was the first study to directly compare survival rates between the three main surgical interventions used in breast cancer: a single or a double mastectomy, or a lumpectomy to removing only the cancerous tissue, followed by radiation therapy.



Comedian Joan Rivers still on life support: daughter


Comedian Joan Rivers arrives for the premiere of the documentary "Joan Rivers - A Piece Of Work" during the 2010 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, UtahComedian Joan Rivers remained on life support on Tuesday after being hospitalized in serious condition due to cardiac arrest last week, her daughter Melissa said. At this time, she does remain on life support," Melissa Rivers said in a statement.



Players using psychologists to find the extra one percent


By Simon Cambers NEW YORK (Reuters) - Tennis players are always looking for that extra 1 percent, the unseen edge that could take them to the very top. A common sight for years in golf and now used extensively in sports like cycling and athletics, for a long time it seemed as though tennis players were reluctant to open up their minds, perhaps fearful of what they might find. Murray has had something of a love-hate relationship with sports psychologists over his career, initially finding them a bit odd, unclear how someone who had never played the game would be able to help him on court. Open, with South Africa's Kevin Anderson praising her for helping him win close matches and rebound from tough defeats.

Mississippi woman gets life sentence in fatal buttocks injection case


FILE - This Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014 file photo shows Tracey Lynn Garner during her trial in Jackson, Miss. On Friday, Aug. 29, 2014, Garner was convicted of murder in connection to illicit silicone buttocks injections that led to a Georgia woman's death. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)A Mississippi woman convicted of murder for administering an unlicensed silicone buttocks injection to a patient who later died was sentenced on Tuesday to life in prison.  Tracey Lynn Garner, 54, performed the unlicensed injection in 2012 in her Jackson home on 37-year-old Karima Gordon, who fell ill immediately after the procedure and died a few days later. A jury last week found Garner guilty of depraved-heart murder. Prosecutors argued during the trial that Garner was motivated by greed.  Garner faces a separate trial in the death of Marilyn Hale, an Alabama woman who authorities say died under similar circumstances two years earlier. Lee McDivitt, an investigator for the Mississippi Attorney General's Office, testified during the trial that he found a large bottle of silicone and syringes in Garner's home that were labeled "veterinary use only." Garner, who is transgender, was formerly named Morris Garner.



Wealthy countries must send medical teams to halt Ebola: Medecins Sans Frontieres


The worst ever outbreak of the Ebola virus will not be halted unless wealthy nations dispatch specialized biological disaster response teams to West Africa to stop its spread, the head of medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres said on Tuesday. "Six months into the worst Ebola epidemic in history, the world is losing the battle to contain it," MSF President Joanne Liu said in a speech to United Nations member states. She said aid charities and West African governments did not have the capacity to stem the outbreak and needed intervention by foreign states. The organization is known in the United States as Doctors Without Borders.

West Africa struggles to contain Ebola as warnings and deaths mount


A man washes his hands at a tap outside the Green Pharmacy at Area 8 in AbujaDoctors in Liberia were out on strike on Tuesday as they struggled to cope with the outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus, while the United Nations warned the spread of the disease in West Africa was causing food shortages in one of the world's poorest regions. Medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) said 800 more beds for Ebola patients were urgently needed in the Liberian capital Monrovia alone, while in Sierra Leone highly infectious bodies were rotting in the streets. MSF called for rich nations to send military medical teams to support buckling healthcare systems in West Africa.



Dolphin virus adds to deaths in troubled Florida lagoon


By Barbara Liston ORLANDO Fla. (Reuters) - A measles-like virus that is blamed for killing hundreds of dolphins on the U.S. East Coast has spread into a Florida lagoon where hundreds of manatees, brown pelicans and dolphins already died mysteriously in recent years. The Indian River Lagoon, south of the Kennedy Space Center, was the scene of the unexplained deaths in 2012 and 2013 and is now threatened by cetacean morbillivirus, which is related to the virus that causes measles in humans. Megan Stolen, a research scientist from the Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, said on Tuesday that the disease was new to Florida's Intercoastal Waterway, which includes the Indian River Lagoon, but that the deaths appear to be over.

Tennis-Players using psychologists to find the extra one percent


By Simon Cambers NEW YORK, Sept 2 (Reuters) - Tennis players are always looking for that extra 1 percent, the unseen edge that could take them to the very top. A common sight for years in golf and now used extensively in sports like cycling and athletics, for a long time it seemed as though tennis players were reluctant to open up their minds, perhaps fearful of what they might find. Murray has had something of a love-hate relationship with sports psychologists over his career, initially finding them a bit odd, unclear how someone who had never played the game would be able to help him on court. Open, with South Africa's Kevin Anderson praising her for helping him win close matches and rebound from tough defeats.

Preschools latest to take on green movement


In this Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014 photo, Three-year old Dash B. plays with wooden blocks at The Green House, an eco-friendly pre-school in Oklahoma City. There are currently about 80 nature-based preschools nationwide, up from 19 in 2009, said Christy Merrick, director of the Natural Start Alliance, which is part of the North American Association for Environmental Education. But she noted that numerous other preschools employ some sort of eco-friendly approach. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Three-year-old Clara Centola seems unconcerned by the adults around her as she works at a mini-kitchen, deciding which cloth-toy fruits and vegetables to serve her imaginary guests. There are no plastic fast-food replicas to choose from at her Oklahoma City preschool, where the real food is vegan and gluten-free.



Watch: American Doctor Working in Liberia Tests Positive for Ebola


It is unclear how the ELWA Hospital staff member, who was treating pregnant woman, contracted the virus.

Ill UK boy's parents freed from custody in Spain


Brett and Naghemeh King, centre and left, leave Soto Del Real prison in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014. British prosecutors are dropping the case against a couple who ended up in a Spanish jail after they tried to get treatment abroad for their son's severe brain tumor, authorities said Tuesday. Brett and Naghemeh King were pursued by police after they took 5-year-old Ashya out of a hospital in southern England against doctors' advice and traveled to Spain, where they planned to sell a property to pay for proton beam radiation therapy in the Czech Republic or the U.S. They were arrested on a British warrant on suspicion of cruelty to a person under 16 years of age, and are in custody in a jail near Madrid. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)SOTO DEL REAL, Spain (AP) — The British parents who took their critically ill child for treatment abroad without doctors' consent were released from custody in Spain on Tuesday after authorities in the United Kingdom dropped charges of child cruelty against them.



U.S. Republican lawmakers say regulators treat insurers unfairly


Chairman of House Financial Service Capital Markets Subcommittee Garrett appears at the Reuters Financial Regulation Summit in WashingtonBy Emily Stephenson WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A group of Republican lawmakers on Tuesday accused U.S. The lawmakers, led by Representative Scott Garrett of New Jersey, said that in trying to identify companies so large that their failure could pose a potential threat to financial markets, regulators have considered more analysis and public feedback on asset management firms than they did about insurance companies.



People with widespread pain more likely to develop insomnia


The risk of long-term sleep problems was even higher for people reporting widespread pain in the survey. It might not be just the pain that's leading to insomnia, the researchers say. Instead, much of the connection could be explained by lifestyle changes that often happen due to persistent pain, said lead author Nicole K.Y. Tang of the University of Warwick in Coventry, U.K. “Although we know that people with chronic pain are more likely to report problems sleeping than people without any pain, we know very little about how the presence of pain leads to the development of insomnia,” said Tang. Anyone with trouble falling or staying asleep, waking early, and waking up feeling tired and worn out on most nights of the last month were put in the insomnia category.

Diets work, but the brand doesn’t matter


By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – When it comes to diet programs, brand names don’t make much difference, according to a new review. Low-carb or low-fat diets resulted in the most weight loss, but despite a difference of a few pounds between groups, all the programs in the study were about equally effective, said lead author Bradley C. Johnston. “The weight loss differences between branded diet programs were small with likely little importance to those seeking to lose weight,” he told Reuters Health by email. Johnston, of the Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute in Toronto and McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, said any diet program should include exercise and behavioral support.

For blind bus riders, a new app boosts independence


By Madeline Kennedy NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – A new smartphone app helps blind people navigate public transit in the Seattle area. The app, called StopInfo, is integrated into a popular existing app called OneBusAway that gives real time information on the location of city buses. StopInfo adds details that help blind riders find the bus stop. This information can be read out loud for blind users of the phone, using VoiceOver mode,” explained Alan Borning in email to Reuters Health.

Obama addresses West Africans on facts about Ebola


FILE - This Aug. 18, 2014 file photo shows President Barack Obama speaking in the James Brady Press Briefing Room in the White House in Washington. President Barack Obama urged West Africans on Tuesday to wear gloves and masks when caring for Ebola patients or burying anyone who died of the disease. He also discouraged the traditional burial practice of directly touching the body of someone who died of Ebola, which is one way the disease has been spreading in the region. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama urged West Africans on Tuesday to wear gloves and masks when caring for Ebola patients or burying anyone who died of the disease. He also discouraged the traditional burial practice of directly touching the body of someone who died of Ebola, which is one way the disease has been spreading in the region.



Common Misconceptions About Spine Surgery


Common Misconceptions About Spine SurgeryThere are a lot of common beliefs about spine surgery that are false or only partially true. It is important that you are well-informed before making any decisions about your health care. When in doubt, always consult a health care professional to get the answers you need.Here are some common thoughts people have about spine surgery. Did you...



U.S. contract approved to speed tests of Mapp's Ebola drug


Department of Health and Human Services said on Tuesday a federal contract worth up to $42.3 million would help accelerate testing of an experimental Ebola virus treatment that is being developed by privately held Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc. The agency said an initial 18-month contract worth $24.9 million had been approved by its Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response and that the contract could be extended up to a total of $42.3 million Mapp, based in San Diego, will manufacture a small amount of the drug, called ZMapp, for early stage safety studies and for animal studies needed to prove its effectiveness and safety in people, the agency said in a statement. It binds to proteins on the Ebola virus and triggers the immune system to destroy them. Mapp previously developed two different cocktails of antibodies, but they protected only 43 percent of monkeys that were given the drug as late as five days after infection. On Friday, scientists reported that ZMapp had cured all 18 lab monkeys infected with Ebola in one trial, including those suffering fever and hemorrhaging that were hours from death.

Ashya King Case Highlights Dilemma of Parents Overriding Doctors


Ashya King Case Highlights Dilemma of Parents Overriding DoctorsBritish Parents Took 5-Year-Old Son to Spain for Alternative Cancer Treatment



Another American Doctor Tests Positive for Ebola in West Africa


Another American Doctor Tests Positive for Ebola in West AfricaSIM Missionary Doctor Worked at Same Hospital as Dr. Kent Brantly



Double mastectomy doesn't boost survival for most


A woman gets a mammogram to screen for breast cancer on May 15, 2001 in Putanges, FranceRemoving both breasts to treat cancer affecting only one side doesn't boost survival chances for most women, compared with surgery that removes just the tumor, a large study suggests. The results raise concerns about riskier, potentially unnecessary operations that increasing numbers of women are choosing.



Another US health worker infected with Ebola


Health care workers, wearing protective suits, leave a high-risk area at the Elwa hospital on August 30, 2014 in MonroviaA third American health worker has tested positive for the Ebola virus while working with patients in West Africa, the Christian missionary group SIM said Tuesday. The group did not release the name of the doctor, but said he had been working in obstetrics at the SIM-funded ELWA hospital in the Liberian capital Monrovia. Two Americans who also worked at ELWA, Doctor Kent Brantly and nurse Nancy Writebol, were previously flown home from Liberia and successfully treated for the virus. Unlike Brantly and Writebol, the new US victim had not been working directly with Ebola patients, and it is not yet clear how he caught the disease, which is usually fatal.



U.S. missionary doctor in Liberia tests positive for Ebola


(Reuters) - An American doctor working in Liberia has tested positive for the Ebola virus after working with obstetrics patients at a missionary hospital in Monrovia, the Christian organization SIM USA said on Tuesday. The North Carolina-based group did not identify the doctor, who had not been treating the Ebola patients hospitalized in isolation on the missionary's sprawling campus. "The doctor is doing well and is in good spirits," SIM USA said in a statement. The worst Ebola outbreak in history has infected more than 3,000 people and killed some 1,550 since it was first detected early this year in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization.

Judge orders immediate release from Spanish jail of ill British boy's parents


Spanish police stand in front of a van that Naghemeh and Brett, parents of seriously ill Ashya King, arrived in, at the Spanish High Court in MadridA Spanish judge has ordered the immediate release from custody of two British parents detained in Madrid for taking their seriously ill child out of hospital, a court source said on Tuesday, speeding a reunion with their five-year-old son. The high-profile case of the parents' arrest and separation from their son prompted British Prime Minister, David Cameron, to call for "an outbreak of common sense" amid widespread condemnation in the country's media of the British police's pursuit of the couple. The parents of Ashya King, who has a brain tumour, were separated from their son on Saturday, following a two-day cross-border manhunt initiated after they ignored medical advice and removed him from a hospital in Southampton, southern England, and took him to Spain. A Spanish court source told Reuters on Tuesday that a judge had ordered the immediate unconditional release from a Madrid jail of Naghemeh and Brett King.



Indianapolis Colts owner pleads guilty to intoxicated driving


James Irsay, owner of the NFL's Indianapolis Colts, is pictured in this handout photo(Reuters) - James Irsay, owner of the National Football League's Indianapolis Colts, pleaded guilty on Tuesday in a deal with prosecutors to a misdemeanor charge of operating a vehicle while intoxicated and was suspended by the league for six games. He was sentenced to 60 days in jail with all but two days suspended and was given two days credit after his arrest, the Hamilton County Prosecuting Attorney's Office said in a statement. Following his guilty plea, the NFL suspended Irsay for the team’s first six regular-season games and fined him the maximum $500,000 for violating the league’s Personal Conduct Policy. In a letter to Irsay, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said, "I have stated on numerous occasions that owners, management personnel and coaches must be held to a higher standard than players.



Teen Diagnosed With Cancer Looks for Cure


Lauren Bendesky was diagnosed with the disease at 14.

Spanish judge orders release of ill boy's parents


This is an undated handout photos issued by England's Hampshire Police on Monday Sept. 1, 2014, of Brett King and Naghemeh King, the parents of Ashya King, who have legal proceedings against them continuing in Spain after they took the five-year-old brain cancer patient out of hospital without doctors' consent. Critically-ill 5-year-old boy Ashya King driven to Spain by his parents is receiving medical treatment for a brain tumor in a Spanish hospital as his parents await extradition to Britain, police said Sunday Aug. 31 2014. Officers received a phone call late Saturday from a hotel east of Malaga advising that a vehicle fitting the description circulated by police was on its premises. Both parents were arrested and the boy, Ashya King, was taken to a hospital, a Spanish police spokesman said. (AP Photo/Hampshire Police)SOTO DEL REAL, Spain (AP) — Spanish officials have ordered the immediate release of a detained British couple who were wanted by police in the United Kingdom after they took their critically ill child for treatment abroad without doctors' consent.



Final trial confirms efficacy of Sanofi's dengue vaccine


By Natalie Huet PARIS (Reuters) - French drugmaker Sanofi, developing the first vaccine against dengue fever, said its product reduced disease cases by 60.8 percent in a large final clinical trial. Sanofi has invested more than 1.3 billion euros ($1.7 billion) in the project, undertaking two decades of research on the world's fastest-growing tropical disease. The final study - conducted on 20,875 children aged 9-16 across five countries in Latin America - confirmed that the vaccine was safe, provided high protection against dengue hemorrhagic fever and cut by 80 percent the risk of hospitalization, the Paris-based company said on Wednesday.

U.S. GMO labeling foes triple spending in first half of this year over 2013


By Carey Gillam (Reuters) - Opponents of mandatory labeling for foods made with genetically modified organisms spent more than $27 million in the first six months of this year on GMO-related lobbying, roughly three times their spending in all of 2013, according to an analysis released Wednesday. The Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) and major food makers such as Coca-Cola Co and PepsiCo Inc and top biotech seed makers Monsanto Co and DuPont were among heavy spenders on GMO labeling-related lobbying, according to a report issued by the Environmental Working Group. ...

3 Tensions Hiding in Your Body


3 Tensions Hiding in Your BodyCheck for these three subtle tensions that cause shallow breathing and learn how to let go of them with these three effective tips. 1. THE SLIGHTLY-TIGHT ASSI don't mean to be rude; it's just that your butt muscles were not intended to be tense 24/7, and believe it or not, a good number of us are going through life with a tense butt and we don't...



Group says world is losing battle against Ebola


Health workers spray the body of a amputee suspected of dying from the Ebola virus with disinfectant, in a busy street in Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014. Food in countries hit by Ebola is getting more expensive and will become scarcer because many farmers won't be able to access fields, a U.N. food agency warned Tuesday. An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people, and authorities have cordoned off entire towns in an effort to halt the virus' spread. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The international group Doctors Without Borders warned Tuesday that the world is losing the battle against Ebola and lamented that treatment centers in West Africa have been "reduced to places where people go to die alone."



CDC says Ebola threatens stability of stricken countries


U.S. CDC educational materials are displayed at a hearing of a House Foreign Affairs subcommittee, about the Ebola crisis in West Africa, on Capitol Hill in WashingtonBy Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - The world's worst Ebola outbreak is threatening the stability of affected and neighboring countries in West Africa, and requires a "massive" effort to bring it under control, the head of the U.S. Already we have widespread transmission Liberia. Frieden said the outbreak was the first epidemic of Ebola the world has ever known, meaning it is spreading widely in society and is "threatening the stability" of affected and neighboring countries. The Charlotte, North Carolina-based group did not identify the physician but said he was not treating Ebola patients and that he had isolated himself immediately when symptoms began.



GE's 3D mammography device gets FDA approval


(Reuters) - General Electric Co's healthcare unit last week won U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for its mammography device that produces three-dimensional images to detect breast cancer. According to the company's website, the device, SenoClaire, uses imaging technology that combines low radiation-dosed X-rays from multiple angles to produce a superior mammogram. The device consists of hardware and software upgrades to the company's previously launched Senographe Essential 2D full-field digital mammography system. ...

Vaccine-autism study under investigation


A study on an alleged link between vaccines and autism has been removed over "serious concerns about the validity of its conclusions."

Menopause Qs you're not asking


Menopause: the permanent end of fertility (and periods!) that commonly happens to women in their late 40s and 50s. For many women, just saying the word can increase anxiety levels.

6 yoga poses to help with sciatica


Sciatica is a real pain in the butt -- and sometimes also in the leg and foot. See six yoga poses that can help provide sciatic pain relief.

Where's my orgasm?


According to studies, 43% of women have experienced some form of sexual dysfunction. Here's what you need to know.

You NEED the corner office


Exposure to daylight improves workers mood, communication abilities, effectiveness on the job, sleep, and overall health.

Spanking's effect on kids' brains


Researchers say physical punishment actually alters the brain -- not only in an "I'm traumatized!" kind of way, but also in an "I literally have less gray matter in my brain!" kind of way.

This is your body on weed


Dr. Sanjay Gupta explains how marijuana affects the brain and how pot can be used to treat certain conditions.

See man after 700-lb. loss


Robert Walls tipped the scales at 950 lbs. before he made a big decision that helped him shed hundreds of pounds.

Teacher eats only McDonald's


A teacher only eats McDonald's for 90 days, and LOSES 37 pounds. KCCI reports.

Selfies leading to head lice


Nurses report "selfie" posts are causing an increase in teenagers spreading lice.

World's most dangerous workout?


Is the "sport of fitness" the world's most dangerous workout? CNN's Jarrett Bellini asks CrossFitters and gives it a go.

Hear Mrs. O rap for healthy foods


First lady Michelle Obama raps about food at an event to propose limits on the types of foods advertised in schools.

American doctor infected with Ebola


Another American aid worker has become infected with the deadly virus, as the death toll in West Africa continues to rise.

The monster that took my son


A week before Cole died, I promised him he would do "something big" someday. For two years, I have been fighting to keep that promise.

Meet the Fittest Man on Earth


From Fittest Man on Earth to new father, CrossFit champion Rich Froning talks about his success at the 2014 Games and where he goes from here.

15 diseases doctors get wrong


After strange pains or mysterious digestive issues, you hope a trip to the doctor will solve your health woes. That's not always the case.

Adam's story: 63 pills a day


The modest clinic on Milpas Street in laid-back Santa Barbara, California, was well known to patients seeking powerful pain medication.

The monster that took my son


A week before Cole died, I promised him he would do "something big" someday. For two years, I have been fighting to keep that promise.

Train your brain to eat better


Following a healthy diet can alter the way your brain responds to high-calorie foods, a new study suggests.

Forget football: Check this out


Get to know Grid League, a new coed sport that's poised to take the fitness world by storm.

What will ALS do with $100M?


CNN's Elizabeth Cohen reports on the amazing amount of cash generated by the viral video trend.

Menopause: Qs you're not asking


Menopause: the permanent end of fertility (and periods!) that commonly happens to women in their late 40s and 50s. For many women, just saying the word can increase anxiety levels.

Surgical 'black box' coming soon


Researchers are working on a tracking device like the ones placed in airplanes that records surgeons' movements during an operation.

'Suicide tourism' has doubled


More than 600 people traveled to Switzerland for the "sole purpose of committing suicide" between 2008 and 2012.

Are your medical records at risk?


Here's what you need to know if your records are stored electronically (and they probably are).

One drink. 8 cookies. Same sugar.



Forget football: This is the Grid League


Get to know Grid League, a new coed sport that's poised to take the fitness world by storm.

No charges for parents of child with brain cancer


The British couple arrested after pulling their cancer-stricken son out of a hospital will not be charged, the Crown Prosecution Service told CNN on Tuesday.

How one family broke junk food addiction


The Leake family joins HLN's Jane Velez-Mitchell to talk about eliminating processed foods for 100 days.

What they never tell you about losing weight


Shannon Britton lost 268 pounds after having gastric bypass surgery. What she's learned since then will surprise you.

Train your brain to crave healthy food


Following a healthy diet can alter the way your brain responds to high-calorie foods, a new study suggests.

Addicted veterans get a second chance


Veterans treatment courts are helping former warriors who struggle with drug and alcohol addiction.

Gupta: How we created a heroin problem


The face of heroin abuse in America is changing. And part of the reason is that society wanted a quick fix to the prescription drug abuse problem.

Ice bucket challenge brings in $100M


CNN's Elizabeth Cohen reports on the amazing amount of cash generated by the viral video trend.

No longer lonely: He lost 225 lbs


Tevante Clark enrolled in a nutrition program to try to lose weight naturally. He figured if that failed, he would get gastric bypass surgery.

She lost 140 lbs with hypnosis


A dream vacation to Hawaii sounded like a nightmare to Julie Evans because it involved wearing a bathing suit. So when she got home, she vowed to change.

Retired teacher loses 200 pounds


"There's another one who will break our equipment," Kathleen Riser overheard one trainer say, pointing at her 350-plus pound frame. Two years later, people now point to Riser as an inspiration.

Mental health help: Where to turn


Americans often don't know where to turn when dealing with a loved one with serious mental illness, but experts emphsize there are resources available.

School start times are unhealthy


If you think school starts too early, you aren't the only one.

Venom may hold cure for cancer


How nanotechnology and synthesized venom may hold the key to stopping cancer cell growth.

Ab workouts are a waste of time


You've been trying forever to get that elusive six-pack: the holy grail of fitness goals. None of the gizmos and doodads advertised online or on TV have worked, so you figure it's time to sign up for that 30-minute abs class at the gym.

Break up with your trainer


After months of personal training, you're still not seeing results. Could it be time to ditch your trainer?

9 nutrition rules for athletes


Follow these nutrition guidelines to ensure your hard work in training pays off.

Inside your mind with 'Brain Games'


Jason Silva from National Geographic's hit show "Brain Games" talks about tricks the mind plays that shape our reality.

The best way to brush


CNN's Martha Shade reports on what's the best way to brush your teeth.

Still smoking after cancer


CNN's Holly Firfer tells us that some people who have beat cancer continue to smoke.

How outbreak can start, and end


Dr. Sanjay Gupta describes how "contact tracing" could help stem the tide of an Ebola outbreak.

The healthiest fish to eat?


As our oceans become more polluted, Sally Kohn sits down with Fabien Cousteau to talk about the healthiest fish to eat.

Plastic surgery gone wrong


Dr. Terry Dubrow and Dr. Paul Nassif from E!'s new show "Botched" discuss the risks and complications of plastic surgery.

Ha! Laughter is the best medicine


Scott Weems, author of "Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why," speaks with CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

Sleep more, lose weight


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us how sleeping more can actually help you feel less hungry.

Say 'Hello.' You'll live longer


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us how something as simple, and as nice, as saying "hello" can help you live to 100.

String may help you live to 100


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us how flossing regularly not only helps prevent heart disease but can also help you live to 100.

Twin boys born 24 days apart


Due to a delayed delivery, a set of twins in Massachusetts were born 24 days apart. WCVB's Mary Saladna reports.

Is red meat really bad for you?


CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks with Nina Teicholz, author of "The Big Fat Surprise."

VIDEO: Trapeze lessons 'help beat depression'


Women suffering from depression are being encouraged to attend a trapeze exercise class to help manage their symptoms.

VIDEO: Airport adopts infrared Ebola 'test'


The BBC's Tomi Oladipo has been speaking to people in Nigeria's most populous city Lagos as the authorities take measures to prevent the spread of the Ebola virus.

VIDEO: 'Mental illness can happen to anyone'


Sam Bailey spoke to BBC News about his experiences with depression.

The girl with three biological parents


The girl who has three biological parents

How much has the ice bucket challenge achieved?


How much has the Ice Bucket Challenge achieved?

Bionic pancreas: A new dawn for diabetics?


Labs in race to find bionic solution for Type 1 Diabetes

Sniffing out the allergy epidemic


Why so many of us are developing allergies

Warning over electrical brain stimulation


Warning over electrical brain stimulation

Ebola crisis: Five ways to avoid the deadly virus


Wash your hands and other top tips to avoid Ebola

Could your clothing save your life?


Could your clothes save your life?

Trauma warning on Foley death video


Will watching a violent death online cause long-term psychological distress?

The malaria mines of Venezuela


Venezuela's illegal mines, where malaria is on the rise

All diets 'have similar results'


All diets - from Atkins to Weight Watchers - have similar results and people should simply pick the one they find easiest, say researchers.

Brain 'can learn to eat healthily'


The brain can be trained to prefer healthy food over unhealthy high-calorie foods, suggests a study from the US.

Japan tackles dengue fever outbreak


Japan is battling its first outbreak of dengue fever in almost 70 years, with at least 22 people confirmed as being infected.

Test Ebola drug '100% effective'


The only trial data on the experimental Ebola drug ZMapp shows it is 100% effective in monkey studies, even in later stages of the infection.

Sniffing faeces 'detects infection'


UK researchers say an "electronic nose" that smells faeces can detect strains of bacteria that can cause deadly infections.

Plain packs 'no illegal smoking link'


A study of smokers in Australia suggests there is "no evidence" that the introduction of standardised cigarette packaging has changed the way people buy cigarettes.

Hospitals seeing more skin cancer


The number of people admitted to hospital for skin cancer treatment in England rose by nearly a third in five years, figures show.

Electrical stimulation 'aids memory'


Electromagnetic stimulation of a specific part of the brain may improve the ability to remember certain facts, researchers say.

Senegal confirms first Ebola case


Senegal's health ministry confirms a first case of Ebola, making it the fifth West African country now affected by the outbreak.

Ebola travel bans 'should be lifted'


West African health ministers call for travel restrictions on countries affected by the Ebola outbreak to be lifted, following WHO advice.

Tomatoes linked with fighting cancer


Eating tomatoes may lower the risk of prostate cancer, research suggests.

Ebola spreads to Nigeria oil hub


Nigeria confirms its first Ebola death outside Lagos, a Port Harcourt doctor, as the WHO says the total number of cases could eventually pass 20,000.

NHS complaints rise to 480 every day


The number of complaints made about NHS care in England increased to an average of 480 every day, according to official data.

Depression in cancer 'overlooked'


Three-quarters of UK cancer patients who are depressed are not getting the psychological therapy they need, researchers say.

Action films 'may make you fat'


Watching action films could make you more likely than other TV programmes to pile on the pounds, according to US researchers.

Gut bugs 'help prevent allergies'


Bacteria which naturally live inside our digestive system can help prevent food allergies, according to animal research.

Ebola: Why is it this disease we fear?


Why does Ebola cause more concern than other diseases?

The man who helped save 50 million lives


The man who helped save 50m people

VIDEO: What goes into a fake cigarette?


The BBC's Tom Brown finds out what is in a fake cigarette

VIDEO: Ebola doctor's traumatic experiences


A doctor from Cardiff talks of her "traumatic" experiences helping Ebola victims in the west African state of Liberia.

VIDEO: Anastacia talks big and little things


Singer songwriter Anastacia tells BBC Breakfast about her post mastectomy experience and new album 'Resurrection'

AUDIO: Tributes as yoga guru dies at 95


Yoga instructor Varuna Shunglu pays tribute to the yoga guru BKS Iyengar, who has died at the age of 95.

VIDEO: Inside Liberia Ebola treatment centre


Following earlier denials, Liberia has admitted that 17 suspected Ebola patients are "missing" after a health centre in the capital was looted.

Ebola response 'lethally inadequate'


A global military intervention is needed to curb the largest ever Ebola outbreak, according to the medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres.

Ebola vaccine human trial begins in US


A potential vaccine for Ebola is being tested in the US, with the first stage looking at how the immune system of 20 volunteers will respond to it.

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