Health News
10/24/2014

Obama offers federal help to NY with Ebola case


President Barack Obama speaks to the media about the government’s Ebola response, in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is offering federal support to New York as it responds to its first Ebola case.



In NYC Ebola case, crowded city complicates efforts to track exposure


Riders stand inside an L-Train subway car, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014, in New York. Craig Spencer, a Doctors Without Borders physician who tested positive for the Ebola virus after treating Ebola patients in West Africa, had taken the train after visiting a bowling alley in Williamsburg. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)By Jonathan Allen and Julie Steenhuysen NEW YORK/CHICAGO (Reuters) - As a New York City doctor tests positive for Ebola after volunteering in West Africa, health officials face the challenge of deciding how wide a net to cast for his possible contacts in the largest, most crowded city in the United States. Dr. Craig Spencer, an emergency doctor who was working with Doctors Without Borders in Ebola-stricken Guinea earlier this month, returned to the city last Friday. ...



5 Reasons Runners Are Like Toddlers


5 Reasons Runners Are Like ToddlersAfter finishing a 50-miler race the other weekend, I decided to spend the next day at the beach -- recovering, naturally. I paddleboarded around for a few of hours and then retired to my towel to enjoy a rare warm and sunny fall afternoon.I wasn't the only one taking advantage of the sunshine, though. The beach was littered with families. Young...



Worst Ebola outbreak on record tests global response


(Reuters) - Global health authorities are struggling to contain the world's worst Ebola epidemic since the disease was identified in 1976. The virus has killed more than 4,500 people. (Interactive graphic on Ebola: http://graphics.thomsonreuters.com/14/ebola/index.html) Here is a timeline of the outbreak: March 22: Guinea confirms a previously unidentified hemorrhagic fever, which killed more than 50 people, is Ebola. March 30: Liberia reports two Ebola cases; suspected cases reported in Sierra Leone. ...

Doctor now with Ebola went through enhanced screening at JFK airport


NEW YORK (Reuters) - The doctor who has been diagnosed with Ebola in New York City arrived at John F. Kennedy International airport on Oct. 17 and went through the ramped-up screening for travelers from the worst-hit West African countries, officials said on Thursday. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said the patient, who had worked with Ebola patients in Guinea, "participated in the enhanced screening for all returning travelers from these countries" on his arrival at JFK. This referred to special screening introduced earlier this month at five major U.S. ...

CDC details new Ebola response and prep teams


President Barack Obama, back left, with Ebola coordinator Ron Klain and members of his team coordinating the government’s Ebola response, speak to the media after their meeting in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, in Washington. At front left is Sylvia Burwell, Secretary of Health and Human Services, and Ambassador Nancy Powell, Special Coordinator for Ebola Response Unit. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)NEW YORK (AP) — The government's new federal Ebola response squads were getting their first test Thursday, dispatched to New York to help care for the city's first case, a doctor who had treated a patient with the disease in west Africa.



Doctor Isolated at NYC Hospital Tests Positive for Ebola


A New York doctor who recently returned from West Africa has tested positive for Ebola Ebola and is being isolated at a New York City hospital, city and state officials said Thursday night.

Overeating at Work? Try This


Overeating at Work? Try ThisThe Chipotle burrito with extra guacamole, eaten at my desk, as I put the finishing touches on a spreadsheet. The kale salad, stuffed hastily in my mouth before rushing off to a meeting. How often have you eaten more than you intended to at work? More than you think you should?I've been there. I've worked in management consulting and at a tech...



One of three close contacts of New York Ebola patient is in hospital


NEW YORK (Reuters) - One of three people who were in close contact with a New York doctor who has Ebola is in the hospital, New York City Health Commissioner Mary Travis Bassett said on Thursday. Dr. Craig Spencer, who worked in West Africa with Ebola patients, tested positive for Ebola and was in isolation at Bellevue Hospital. (Reporting by Barbara Goldberg; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

Baxter's blood disorder drug gets FDA approval


(Reuters) - Drugmaker Baxter International Inc said the U.S. Food and Drug Administration had approved its drug for treating bleeding episodes in adults with a rare bleeding disorder. The drug, Obizur, has been approved for use in patients with acquired hemophilia A, which usually affects older adults, Baxter said in a statement. The drug will be launched in the United States in the coming months and is being reviewed by European and Canadian regulators, the company said. (Reporting by Shailesh Kuber in Bangalore; Editing by Kirti Pandey)

Wall St. opens flat as Microsoft offsets Amazon


A woman carries an umbrella as she passes by the New York Stock Exchange on Broad St. in New York's financial district during the morning rushNEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. stocks opened flat on Friday, as disappointing earnings from Amazon were offset by gains in Microsoft after its quarterly results. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 10.41 points, or 0.06 percent, to 16,688.31, the S&P 500 gained 0.61 points, or 0.03 percent, to 1,951.43 and the Nasdaq Composite added 4.63 points, or 0.1 percent, to 4,457.42. (Reporting by Chuck Mikolajczak; Editing by Bernadette Baum)



Doctor with Ebola in New York hospital after return from Guinea


An exterior view of Bellevue Hospital in New York CityBy Ellen Wulfhorst and Sebastien Malo NEW YORK (Reuters) - A doctor who worked in West Africa with Ebola patients was in an isolation unit in New York City on Friday after testing positive for the virus, becoming the fourth person diagnosed with the disease in the United States and the first in its largest city. Dr. Craig Spencer, 33, was placed in a quarantined unit at Bellevue Hospital on Thursday, six days after returning from Guinea, renewing public jitters about transmission of the disease and rattling financial markets. ...



Retracing the Steps of Doctor Who Tested Positive for Ebola


Dr. Craig Spencer was placed in isolation, with three others under quarantine.

Pakistan detects more polio cases on awareness day


ISLAMABAD (AP) — The World Health Organization said Friday that three more polio cases have surfaced in Pakistan, bringing the number of new cases to 220, a record figure that authorities blame on attacks by insurgents targeting vaccination teams.

After 1st Ebola case in NYC, 3 others quarantined


FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2014, file photo, Bellevue Hospital nurse Belkys Fortune, left, and Teressa Celia, Associate Director of Infection Prevention and Control, pose in protective suits in an isolation room, in the Emergency Room of the hospital, during a demonstration of procedures for possible Ebola patients in New York. A doctor who recently returned to New York City from West Africa is being tested for the Ebola virus. The doctor had a fever and gastrointestinal symptoms and was taken Thursday to Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)NEW YORK (AP) — A doctor who became New York City's first Ebola patient was praised for getting treatment immediately upon showing symptoms, and health officials stressed that the nation's most populous city need not fear his wide-ranging travel in the days before his illness began.



EU regulator backs continued use of Ariad Pharma's leukemia drug


(Reuters) - European regulators recommended continued use of Ariad Pharmaceuticals Inc's cancer drug, Iclusig, in its already approved indications to treat certain kinds of leukemia. However, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) recommended additional warnings in Iclusig's European product information to minimize the risk of vascular events, Ariad said. The decision follows a positive recommendation from the EMA's Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee, which said earlier this month that the benefits of Iclusig continued to outweigh its risks. ...

Ebola could kill 90,000 in Liberia by year-end unless efforts scaled up: study


Health workers carry the body of an Ebola virus victim in the Waterloo district of FreetownBy Magdalena Mis LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Efforts to control the Ebola virus in Liberia must be quickly and dramatically scaled up or tens of thousands of people will die in the coming months, said a study published on Friday. Nearly 4,900 deaths have been recorded across West Africa since the virus was first detected in Guinea in March, according to the World Health Organization. Liberia has been the hardest hit of the countries most affected by the virus, with 2,705 deaths and 4,665 recorded cases. ...



Canadian consulate in Istanbul gets package containing yellow powder: Turkish disaster body


A member of Turkey's disaster management agency disinfects the garden of the German consulate in IstanbulISTANBUL (Reuters) - Turkish authorities on Friday launched an investigation after an unidentified yellow powder was found in a package sent to the Canadian consulate in Istanbul. "The letter containing a yellow substance was examined in line with regular procedures," Turkey's disaster management agency, AFAD, said in a statement. One Canadian consulate employee came directly into contact with the suspicious package and six others had indirect exposure, the statement said. The German and Belgian consulates also received similar packages containing the yellow powder, Turkish media reported. ...



EU backs drug for rare sun intolerance from Australia's Clinuvel


LONDON (Reuters) - European patients with a rare genetic disease that causes intolerance to sunlight should soon have a new treatment option, following a green light for a drug from Australia's Clinuvel Pharmaceuticals. The biotech company is pinning its hopes on Scenesse, the first medicine for preventing phototoxicity in adults with erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP). After exposure to sunlight, patients with EPP feel a stinging pain in sun-exposed skin and prolonged exposure can lead to an incapacitating pain, often followed by redness and swelling. ...

Beds at Ebola treatment units empty in Liberia


In this photo taken Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. Grave diggers dug graves to bury Ebola victims at Bong county outskirt of Monrovia, Liberia. Even as Liberians get sick and die of Ebola, many beds in treatment centers are empty because of the government’s order that the bodies of all suspected Ebola victims be cremated. The edict violates Liberians’ values and cultural practices and has so disturbed people that the sick are often being kept at home and, if they die, are being secretly buried, increasing the risk of more infections. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) — Even as Liberians fall ill and die of Ebola, many beds in treatment centers are empty because of the government's order that the bodies of all suspected Ebola victims in the capital be cremated, authorities have determined.



AstraZeneca cancer drug pipeline gets boost from European green light


A sign is seen at an AstraZeneca site in MacclesfieldBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - AstraZeneca's cancer drug pipeline received a boost on Friday, as European regulators recommended approval of an experimental medicine against ovarian cancer. The green light from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for olaparib, or Lynparza, is welcome news since the product hit a road bump in June when a U.S. panel voted against its accelerated approval. AstraZeneca has flagged the medicine as a potential $2 billion-a-year seller. Olaparib blocks an enzyme involved in cell repair and is designed for patients with certain hereditary gene mutations. ...



New York confirms first Ebola case


A New York City Department of Health and Hospitals Police (NYHP) officer walks past the entrance to Bellevue Hospital October 23, 2014 where a doctor who recently returned to New York from West Africa is being treated for EbolaNew York confirmed the first case of Ebola in the largest city in the United States as the EU dramatically ramped up aid Friday to contain the killer epidemic ravaging west Africa. The EU announcement of one billion euros ($1.3 billion) for the worst-hit countries comes as fears of a spread of the virus grew, with the first confirmed case in Mali, where a two-year-old girl has tested positive. The World Health Organization (WHO), which has warned the Ebola crisis in west Africa "remains of great concern", held talks Thursday on efforts to ensure access to and funding for potential vaccines. The New York case is a doctor who recently returned from treating Ebola patients in Guinea, the epicenter of the world's worst outbreak of the disease.



Cameron: EU secures $1.25 billion for Ebola fight


British Prime Minister David Cameron walks past journalists on the second day of an EU summit in Brussels, on Friday, Oct. 24, 2014. EU leaders gather for a two-day summit in which they discuss Ebola, climate change and the economy. (AP Photo/Yves Logghe)BRUSSELS (AP) — British Prime Minister David Cameron says that the European Union and its 28 member nations have secured 1 billion euros ($1.25 billion) to fight the Ebola crisis in West Africa.



WHO sending Ebola experts to Mali, 43 people monitored for virus


Health worker checks the temperature of a baby entering Mali from Guinea at the border in KouremaleGENEVA (Reuters) - The World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday it was sending more experts to help Mali fight Ebola, a day after the first case of the disease was confirmed there. Malian authorities said on Thursday a two-year-old girl who had traveled to neighboring Guinea was infected -- making Mali the sixth West African country to be touched by the worst outbreak on record of the hemorrhagic fever, which has killed almost 4,900 people. . ...



Hikma Pharma shares slip on FDA warning for Portugal plant


(Reuters) - Drugmaker Hikma Pharmaceuticals Plc said the U.S. health regulator had raised issues related to environmental monitoring at its plant in Portugal, which some analysts said accounts for about a quarter of the company's U.S. injectibles sales. Shares in the Jordanian company fell more than 6 percent on Friday as the warning added to disappointment of weak branded drug sales and a case filed by Takeda Pharmaceutical Co against the approval of Hikma's drug for gout flares. Hikma's stock was the top percentage loser on the FTSE-250 Midcap Index in the morning. ...

UK boy finishes proton therapy in Prague for tumor


PRAGUE (AP) — A clinic in Prague says British boy Ashya King has completed his proton beam therapy treatment for a life-threatening brain tumor.

EU leaders agree to raise Ebola aid budget to 1 bln euros


BRUSSELS (Reuters) - European Union leaders agreed on Friday to roughly double their financial support for efforts to fight the deadly Ebola epidemic in Africa to 1 billion euros, the chairman of their Brussels summit, European Council President Herman Van Rompuy, said. "EU will increase financial help to 1 billion euros to fight Ebola in West Africa," he said in a Twitter messsage. Total contributions from the 28 nations had been running at about 500 million euros ($630 million) and there had been criticism that the wealthy Europeans were not doing more. (1 US dollar = 0.7908 euro)

EU leaders agree to raise Ebola aid budget to 1 billion euros


BRUSSELS (Reuters) - European Union leaders agreed on Friday to roughly double their financial support for efforts to fight the deadly Ebola epidemic in Africa to 1 billion euros, the chairman of their Brussels summit, European Council President Herman Van Rompuy, said. "EU will increase financial help to 1 billion euros to fight Ebola in West Africa," he said in a Twitter message. Total contributions from the 28 nations had been running at about 500 million euros ($630 million) and there had been criticism that the wealthy Europeans were not doing more. (1 US dollar = 0. ...

Britons had less gum disease in Roman times than today: study


Britons had less gum disease in Roman times than today: studyBritons had far less gum disease in the Roman era than today, and oral health has seriously worsened despite the advent of toothbrushes and dentists, a study said Friday.



Australian doctors transplant 'dead' hearts in surgical breakthrough


The revolutionary technique involves donor hearts being transferred to a portable machine where they are placed in a preservation solution, resuscitated and kept warmSydney (AFP) - Australian surgeons said Friday they have used hearts which had stopped beating in successful transplants, in what they said was a world first that could change the way organs are donated.



Watch: Ohio College Student Diagnosed with Brain Cancer Receives Final Wish


Lauren Hill, 19, will get to play one last game of college basketball with her Mount St Joe's team.

Official cites 'epidemic of fear' in US


Aaron Yah, center, makes comments to reporters as he stands with Saymandy Lloyd, left, and Youngor Jallah during a protest outside of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014, in Dallas. Jallah, daughter of Louise Troh who was Thomas Eric Duncan's fiance listens as Yah comments on the care Duncan received from the hospital before passing away from complications of the Ebola virus. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)WASHINGTON (AP) — The likelihood of a significant outbreak of Ebola in the U.S. is remote, in the view of a top Health and Human Services official who is assuring lawmakers that government agencies are preparing for any contingency.



Cash aid for refugees succeeds despite donors' doubts


By Oliver Holmes BEIRUT (Reuters) - For decades, aid groups have assumed they know what's best for refugees and the poor; a growing body of evidence suggests they're wrong. Both academic research and practical experience, such as with the mass of Syrians fleeing civil war, shows that simply handing out traditional relief goods may not be the most effective way of helping the dispossessed. Aid agencies are tentatively also giving away cash and letting refugees decide for themselves what they need. ...

'Clever' Japan firm donates high-tech masks for Ebola fight


The Clever company's Pittarich mask, pictured on February 3, 2014A little-known Japanese company has donated 10,000 high-tech face masks to several Ebola-hit African nations and says it is now getting calls from New York City, which confirmed its first case of the virus Thursday. Clever, a maker of air filters, said it is sending thousands of the $75 masks for use by doctors and other health professionals in Guinea, Liberia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. "We got a call from the government of Guinea asking for our product," said Tsuyoshi Nakagawara, a board member of the firm which is based in central Aichi prefecture, a major industrial centre. Clever says its Pittarich mask -- originally developed for the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, known as the MERS -- is coated in chemicals that kill 99 percent of viruses, including Ebola, when they come into contact with the specialised device.



Nigeria pledges 600 volunteers as Africa steps up Ebola fight


By Felix Onuah and Umaru Fofana ABUJA/FREETOWN (Reuters) - Nigeria pledged on Thursday to send a contingent of 600 volunteers to help fight the worst ever outbreak of Ebola on record which has killed nearly 5,000 people in West Africa. With financial pledges flowing in from around the world but trained doctors and nurses scarce in the three worst effected countries -- Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, the African Union appealed last week to member states to urgently fill the gap. ...

Mali becomes sixth West African nation hit by Ebola


A health worker sprays a colleague with disinfectant during a training session for Congolese health workers to deal with Ebola virus in KinshasaBy Adama Diarra and Tiemoko Diallo BAMAKO (Reuters) - Mali confirmed its first case of Ebola on Thursday, becoming the sixth West African country to be touched by the worst outbreak on record of the haemorrhagic fever, which has killed nearly 4,900 people. Mali's Health Minister Ousmane Kone told state television that the patient in the western town of Kayes was a two-year-old girl who had recently arrived from neighbouring Guinea, where the outbreak began. "The condition of the girl, according to our services, is improving thanks to her rapid treatment," the minister told state television. ...



Doctor who worked in Africa first Ebola case in New York City


Police officers guard the building where Dr. Craig Spencer lives in New YorkBy Ellen Wulfhorst NEW YORK (Reuters) - A New York City doctor who treated Ebola patients in West Africa became the first person to test positive for the virus in America's largest city, setting off fresh fears about the spread of the disease. New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said residents were safe to travel around the city, even as officials disclosed that Dr. Craig Spencer had ridden subways, taken a taxi and visited a bowling alley since returning from Guinea on Oct. 17. Spencer, 33, had worked with the humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders in Africa. ...



New York officials: Doctor has Ebola, 1st in city


Officials: New York doctor has Ebola, 1st in cityNEW YORK (AP) — A Doctors Without Borders physician who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus, according to preliminary test results, city officials said Thursday.



WHO expects around 200,000 Ebola vaccine doses by mid 2015


A medical staff holds a package of an experimental candidate vaccine rVSV-ZEBOV against Ebola virus disease at the University hospital in GenevaBy Stephanie Nebehay and Kate Kelland GENEVA/LONDON (Reuters) - The World Health Organization (WHO) set out plans on Friday for speeding up development and deployment of experimental Ebola vaccines, saying hundreds of thousands of doses should be ready for use in West Africa by the middle of 2015. The Geneva-based United Nations health agency confirmed that two leading vaccine candidates are in human clinical trials, and said another five experimental vaccines were also being developed and would begin clinical trials next year. "Before the end of the first half of 2015 ... ...



With U.S. Ebola fear running high, African immigrants face ostracism


By Sharon Bernstein (Reuters) - When Zuru Pewu picked up her 4-year-old son, Micah, from kindergarten at a Staten Island, New York, public school recently, a woman pointed at her in front of about 30 parents and their children, and started shouting. "She kept screaming, 'These African bitches brought Ebola into our country and are making everybody sick!'" said Pewu, 29, who emigrated from Liberia in 2005. "Then she told her son, 'You know the country that's called Liberia that they show on the TV? That's where these bitches are from.'" Pewu's experience points to an alarming trend. ...

Living life from a hospital room


A 17-year-old girl living with cystic fibrosis makes the hospital her happy place. "Every breath I take is a miracle," she says.

The next medicinal marijuana?


Ayahuasca is a psychedelic drink that's attracting more and more tourists to the remote corners of the Amazon. But is it a drug, or is it medicine?

Researchers retract diet pill study


Dr. Mehmet Oz has been under fire recently for promoting weight loss products on TV's "The Dr. Oz Show" that aren't backed by a lot of scientific evidence. Now a study supporting one of those products, diet pills made with green coffee bean extract, has been withdrawn by its lead researchers.

New hope for paralysis cure


A man paralyzed after his spinal cord was severed is walking again after a transplant using cells from his nasal cavity.

A one-woman Ebola hospital


22-year-old Fatu Kekula nursed her mother, father and sister through Ebola using trash bags to protect herself.

Crab's blood could save your life


Hundreds of thousands of horseshoe crabs are captured each year for their incredible blue blood.

The monster that took my son


A week before Cole died, I promised him he would do "something big" someday. For two years, I have been fighting to keep that promise.

Could the Amazon hold the cure for PTSD?


A former Marine sergeant writes about his journey from an eager recruit to a traumatized young man and why he and other war veterans are seeking treatment from a psychedelic drug found deep inside the Amazon jungle.

Study: 3 a month will fly with Ebola


Up to three Ebola-infected travelers might board an international flight each month in West Africa, researchers say.

Researchers retract study supporting diet pills promoted by Dr. Oz


Dr. Mehmet Oz has been under fire recently for promoting weight loss products on TV's "The Dr. Oz Show" that aren't backed by a lot of scientific evidence. Now a study supporting one of those products, diet pills made with green coffee bean extract, has been withdrawn by its lead researchers.

45,000-year-old leg bone offers clues to Stone Age mating


DNA from a 45,000-year-old leg bone is giving scientists a better idea of when modern humans first started mating with Neanderthals.

Are obese dummies the key to preventing road deaths?


To accommodate the increasing numbers of overweight drivers, car safety experts are developing an obese dummy.

Cell transplant allows paralyzed man to walk again, researchers say


A ground-breaking cell transplant has allowed a paralyzed man to walk again, researchers announced Tuesday.

This curable disease killed 1.5 million in 2013


A World Health Organization report on tuberculosis shows that 9 million people developed the disease in 2013 and 1.5 million died, making it one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases.

Straighten out smartphone slump!


As you cradle your smartphone or lean into your laptop to read this, what's your posture like? Even if you aren't doing it right now, how much of your day is spent with your neck lurched forward, shoulders slumped and chest collapsed? All that time in "smartphone slump" not only makes you look and feel stressed, it can cause persistent pain.

The 5 biggest breakfast myths


The first meal of the day can have a very different meaning for different people.

5 healthy Halloween treats


We love Halloween season. Sweets. Sweaters. Sipping hot cider (maybe spiked). Halloween can certainly get you in the spirit, and nothing warms our hearts like these healthy Halloween treats that help you stay energized instead of stuck in a sugar coma.

Reduce your risk of dementia


The statistics, unfortunately, are staggering. An estimated 44 million people worldwide are living with dementia, according to a report released Tuesday by Alzheimer's Disease International.

Hallucinogens to treat depression?


Psychedelic drugs are being researched as a potential treatment for conditions ranging from anxiety to tobacco and alcohol addiction.

Lack of sleep may shrink your brain


Can sleep deprivation affect the size of your brain? It's possible, a recent study published in an online issue of Neurology suggests.

Mental illness: Time to break taboo


350 million people around the world suffer from depression. Why aren't we talking about it?

Schizophrenia is eight disorders


What we know -- and psychiatrists have diagnosed for decades -- as schizophrenia may really be eight separate diseases, research published in The American Journal of Psychiatry suggests.

Adam's story: 63 pills a day


The modest clinic on Milpas Street in laid-back Santa Barbara, California, was well known to patients seeking powerful pain medication.

Migraines linked to Parkinson's


People who suffer from migraines with aura during middle age have double the risk of developing Parkinson's disease or other movement disorders later in life than those who do not, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Neurology.

Music helps your brain


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us why music therapy is good for the brain and how it can help us live to 100.

Live to 100: Laugh more


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us how laughing more can help us live to 100.

Eat chocolate. Yes, chocolate.


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tell us how eating certain types of chocolate can help us live to 100.

Visit to Sanjay Gupta's past


Dr. Sanjay Gupta traveled from Pakistan to Michigan to discover his family's roots. Here's what he learned along the way.

How to really lose weight


From what to eat to how much to exercise, Elizabeth Cohen explains what you really need to do to lose weight.

Keeping young athletes safe


CNN's Holly Firfer reports on ways parents can keep their student athletes safe.

Lab holds 2,000 brains


The University of Miami Brain Endowment Bank provides brain tissues to researchers to study various brain disorders.

Smart toothbrush tracks brushing


This Bluetooth enabled toothbrush coaches you while you brush and tracks your progress through a smartphone app.

Farming in the city


This urban farm supplies fresh produce to food deserts, but also offers other benefits to individuals and the community.

Can psychedelic drugs be medicine?


Psychiatrists are now considering the benefits of LSD and other psychedelic drugs in treatment. Dr. Sanjay Gupta reports.

What is 'too much' caffeine?


Carl Azuz reports on why consuming too much caffeine is not good for you.

Inside your mind with 'Brain Games'


Jason Silva from National Geographic's hit show "Brain Games" talks about tricks the mind plays that shape our reality.

The best way to brush


CNN's Martha Shade reports on what's the best way to brush your teeth.

How outbreak can start, and end


Dr. Sanjay Gupta describes how "contact tracing" could help stem the tide of an Ebola outbreak.

The healthiest fish to eat?


As our oceans become more polluted, Sally Kohn sits down with Fabien Cousteau to talk about the healthiest fish to eat.

Plastic surgery gone wrong


Dr. Terry Dubrow and Dr. Paul Nassif from E!'s new show "Botched" discuss the risks and complications of plastic surgery.

Ha! Laughter is the best medicine


Scott Weems, author of "Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why," speaks with CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

Twin boys born 24 days apart


Due to a delayed delivery, a set of twins in Massachusetts were born 24 days apart. WCVB's Mary Saladna reports.

Is red meat really bad for you?


CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks with Nina Teicholz, author of "The Big Fat Surprise."

This is your body on weed


Dr. Sanjay Gupta explains how marijuana affects the brain and how pot can be used to treat certain conditions.

Teacher eats only McDonald's


A teacher only eats McDonald's for 90 days, and LOSES 37 pounds. KCCI reports.

World's most dangerous workout?


Is the "sport of fitness" the world's most dangerous workout? CNN's Jarrett Bellini asks CrossFitters and gives it a go.

Timeline: Ebola in New York


A doctor who recently returned from Guinea has tested positive for Ebola -- the first case of the deadly virus in New York City.

Living life from a hospital room


A 17-year-old girl living with cystic fibrosis makes the hospital her happy place. "Every breath I take is a miracle," she says.

The next medicinal marijuana?


Ayahuasca is a psychedelic drink that's attracting more and more tourists to the remote corners of the Amazon. But is it a drug, or is it medicine?

See King Tut's 'virtual autopsy'


King Tutankhamun's golden, mummified remains tell only a partial story of an ancient Egyptian boy king who died under mysterious circumstances.

50 pounds lost for 50th reunion


In January, Carol Highsmith, 68, began a journey of threes. She had three milestones of 50 that she planned to reach by following three simple rules:

How rabbi lost 100 pounds


Rabbi Pesach Sommer lost 100 pounds after a doctor told him he had type 2 diabetes.

It's time to get your flu shot!


Flu season is about to begin, the CDC says. And health officials have a few updates to their recommendations.

Flu shot myths addressed


Flu vaccine myths can confuse people trying to decide whether to get a shot. Here are five common myths and, based on information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the truth.

Vintage cold and flu ads



New link between coffee and DNA


You can blame that third cup of Joe on your genes.

Beer may be good for your brain


An element in beer may be good for your brain and other things we learned from medical journals this week.

Six surprising Ebola numbers


Six surprising figures from the frontline

To walk again - the people behind the story


The project that enabled a paralysed man to walk again

Ebola: WHO under fire over response to epidemic


Global health body under fire over Ebola

Ebola crisis: How Nigeria's Dr Adadevoh fought the virus


How one doctor saved Nigeria from a catastrophe

Nigeria fights back against Ebola


Nigeria's lesson in how to prevent an outbreak

Ebola: How many people have died?


Why we don't know how many people Ebola has killed

Ebola treatments - how far off?


How soon could there be an off-the-shelf treatment and vaccine?

Why in a single year did life expectancy in the US drop by 12 years?


Why did life expectancy in the US drop by 12 years after WW1

Radio to the rescue: many saved


How broadcasting health messages can save lives

Millions of Ebola vaccine doses for 2015


Million of doses of an Ebola vaccine will be produced by the end of 2015, the World Health Organization has announced.

First transplant of 'dead' heart


Surgeons in Australia say they have performed the first heart transplant using a "dead heart".

Later sunsets 'make kids more active'


Moving the clocks forward by one extra hour all year could lead to children getting two more minutes of exercise every day, say UK researchers.

'Nine million have TB' - WHO report


The World Health Organization revises its estimate as to how many people have tuberculosis up by 500,000, in its latest report into the killer disease.

Male genes linked to early death


The male Y sex chromosome may have a role in prolonging men's lives and fighting cancer, according to a study.

Man walks again after transplant


A paralysed man becomes the first in the world to walk again following a pioneering therapy which involved transplanting cells from his nose into his severed spinal cord.

Ebola blood-therapy team set up


An international team of scientists is set up to determine the effectiveness of using the blood of Ebola-survivors as a treatment.

Scans reveal cause of winter blues


Scientists say they have identified the underlying reason why some people are prone to the winter blues, or seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

Nigeria declared free of Ebola


The World Health Organization declares Nigeria officially free of Ebola - hailing it a "spectacular success story" - after six weeks with no new cases.

Ebola-hit nations get key supplies


Vital supplies to tackle Ebola are beginning to arrive in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone - the worst-hit countries, Ghana's president says.

Ebola nurse Pooley back in Africa


William Pooley, the British nurse who contracted Ebola while volunteering in West Africa, returns to Sierra Leone to work at a hospital.

Sugary drinks warning posters 'work'


Signs warning shoppers how much exercise they need to do to burn off the sugar in fizzy drinks could be a useful tool in the fight against obesity, research suggests.

Awareness signs in vegetative patients


Scientists have found hidden signatures in the brains of people in a vegetative state which suggest they might be conscious.

Fly genes hold clue to human illness


Scientists sequence the entire genome of the common housefly in a bid to find cures for human diseases.

Woman finds three-inch leech in nose


A backpacker finds a leech which had been living in her nose for a month after returning from a trip to South East Asia.

Ebola: Why is it this disease we fear?


Why does Ebola cause more concern than other diseases?

Suspended between life and death


The wards full of patients suspended between life and death

VIDEO: Security for polio workers in Pakistan


The number of cases of polio in Pakistan has topped 200 for the first time in nearly 15 years.

VIDEO: Could amputees re-grow lost limbs?


Amputees could one day re-grow their missing limbs, according to researchers at Imperial College London.

VIDEO: The frantic race for an Ebola vaccine


The WHO has been holding a meeting to discuss potential vaccines for Ebola. It wants senior figures from the pharmaceutical industry to find ways to speed up testing and production of drugs.

VIDEO: In numbers: Treating Ebola patients


BBC News looks at what it takes to treat Ebola patients, in numbers and graphics.

VIDEO: Nigeria's 'hero doctor' who spotted Ebola


The WHO is expected to declare Nigeria free from Ebola on Monday with no reported cases of the virus for six weeks due to a rapid and thorough response from healthcare professionals.

VIDEO: Bondi Beach surfers fight depression


Grant Trebilco started Fluro Fridays on Australia's Bondi Beach to help fight his own bipolar disorder - now more than 100 surfers join him each week.

VIDEO: Ebola survivors’ blood 'saving lives'


Blood from survivors of the Ebola virus is being used to treat patients suffering from the disease.

VIDEO: Mobile screens to help the short sighted


Scientists at MIT are working on trying to create "superhuman vision".

Ebola crisis: 'We need help, serious help'


Sierra Leone sailor asks for international help to end the epidemic

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