Health News
8/22/2014

Oil spill that fouled Mexican river will take months to clean up


An oil pipeline spill that contaminated a river in the northern Mexican state of Nuevo Leon will take months to clean up, the country's top water authority said on Thursday. The 24-inch Madero-Cadereyta pipeline, owned by national oil company Pemex, was ruptured when thieves attempted to tap into it, the company said on Sunday. The pipeline feeds crude to Pemex's nearby Cadereyta refinery. David Korenfeld, head of Mexico's national water commission, told reporters in Mexico City that the spill extended across a 6 kilometer (4 mile) stretch of the Rio San Juan, but had been contained by floating barriers.

Instant noodles carry health risks for women: study


A vendor prepares instant noodles in Jakarta on October 12, 2010Women who eat instant noodles, like Ramen, at least two times a week face a greater risk of high blood pressure, elevated blood sugar and high cholesterol, US researchers said Thursday. The study looked at data from 10,711 adults -- just over half of whom were women -- in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Researchers at Harvard University found that there was a 68 percent higher risk of metabolic syndrome among women, but not men, who ate instant noodles more than twice per week. Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that raise the risk of heart disease and diabetes.



US Ebola Patients Out of Hospital But Outbreak Worsens in West Africa


US Ebola Patients Out of Hospital But Outbreak Worsens in West AfricaDr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol Released From U.S. Hospital After Ebola Infection



Ebola: Care and recovery of 2 American aid workers


Ebola victim Dr. Kent Brantly looks on during a news conference after being released from Emory University Hospital, Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014, in Atlanta. Another American aid worker, Nancy Writebol, who was also infected with the Ebola virus, was released from the hospital Tuesday. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)NEW YORK (AP) — Two American aid workers have recovered from Ebola and left an Atlanta hospital, after weeks of intensive treatment in a special isolation unit.



Robin Williams' ashes scattered in San Francisco Bay


Williams speaks at a panel for the television series "The Crazy Ones" during the CBS portion of the Television Critics Association Summer press tour in Beverly HillsComedian Robin Williams' ashes have been scattered in the San Francisco Bay following his apparent suicide, according to a death certificate released by Marin County on Thursday. Williams, 63, was found hanged in his Tiburon, California, home last week. The "Mrs. Doubtfire" star had been suffering from severe depression, anxiety and early Parkinson's disease before his death. Williams' cremated remains were released on Aug. 12, the day after his death, according to the document.



Ireland tests suspected Ebola case after death


Irish authorities are testing a "suspected case of Ebola virus" after a person who travelled to an affected area in Africa was found dead, the health service sayIrish authorities are testing a "suspected case of Ebola virus" after a person who travelled to an affected area in Africa was found dead, the health service said on Thursday. "The public health department was made aware earlier today of the remains of an individual, discovered early this morning, who had recently travelled to the one of the areas in Africa affected by the current Ebola virus disease outbreak," the Health Service Executive (HSE) said in a statement. The outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa is the largest ever and has killed 1,350 people in Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Nigeria since March. "We await the outcome of the laboratory tests before we will know whether or not this individual had contracted Ebola virus disease," said Darina O'Flanagan, the head of the HSE health protection surveillance centre.



Knee replacement may go poorly for people who think life isn’t fair


By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – People who tend to blame others for their suffering and think setbacks in their lives are irreparable tend to report more pain after knee replacement surgery, according to a new study. “Pain is a complex phenomenon that is influenced by biological, social, and psychological factors,” said lead author Esther Yakobov, a doctoral student in clinical psychology at McGill University in Montreal. “Studies conducted with patients who suffer from chronic pain because of an injury demonstrated that individuals who judge their experience as unfair, focus on their losses, and blame others for their painful condition also tend to experience more pain and recover from their injuries slower than individuals who do not,” she told Reuters Health by email. For the new study, a group of 116 men and women with severe osteoarthritis, between ages 50 and 85 years old and scheduled for knee replacement surgery in Canada, first filled out questionnaires assessing perceived injustice, how much they think about or worry about pain and their fear of movement or re-injury.

Asthma attack rates similar for black and white kids


Disparities between white and black kids with asthma in rates of emergency department visits or hospitalizations have shrunk and rates of asthma attacks – another sign of poorly managed asthma – are the same, researchers found. “In general, this is good news - once differences in asthma prevalence rates are taken into account, national estimates show that progress has been made in addressing asthma disparities among children,” Dr. Lara Akinbami, who led the study, told Reuters Health in an email. “But, the flipside is that disparities remain, especially for asthma deaths, and black children were increasingly likely to have asthma, and thus disproportionately at risk for the health risks that come from having asthma,” said Akinbami, a researcher with the National Center for Health Statistics in Hyattsville, Maryland.

Marching and praying, U.S. clerics seek to restore calm in Ferguson


Clergymen shout as they march to the County Prosecutor McCulloch's office to protest the shooting death of unarmed black teen Michael Brown in Clayton, MissouriBy Carey Gillam and Scott Malone FERGUSON Mo. (Reuters) - Some clad in clerical collars and others in flowing robes, religious leaders have descended on Ferguson, Missouri, to help end nearly two weeks of violence sparked by the police killing of an unarmed black teenager. We are close, we are so close," said Tommie Pierson, pastor of Greater St. Mark Family Church, a gathering place for counseling and communication between religious leaders, residents and others protesting the Aug. 9 killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown. "We can see that the clergy has the community's trust and you can see the value of that," said Highway Patrol Captain Ron Johnson, who was appointed to oversee security for Ferguson during the protests. "The trend is good." An explosion of anger over the shooting of Brown by a white police officer, 28-year-old Darren Wilson, has cast the St. Louis suburb of 21,000 people into the international spotlight as a symbol of often troubled U.S.



Study: Combining vaccines boosts polio immunity


FILE - This Nov. 7, 2013 file photo shows a displaced Syrian child receiving vaccination against polio at one of the Syrian refugee camps in the southern port city of Sidon, Lebanon. Polio has been wiped out of many countries thanks to massive use of oral vaccine. But new research suggests trying a one-two punch where the disease is still a threat: Giving a single vaccine shot to children who’ve already gotten the drops boosted their immunity. World Health Organization officials say the combination strategy could help finally eradicate polio. (AP Photo/Mohammed Zaatari, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — New research suggests a one-two punch could help battle polio in some of the world's most remote and strife-torn regions: Giving a single vaccine shot to children who've already swallowed drops of an oral polio vaccine greatly boosted their immunity.



Why My Dad Committed Suicide


Why My Dad Committed SuicideTwenty-five years ago, my dad committed suicide when he was 54. I was 19. Why? I demanded. Whywhywhywhywhy? I was old enough to be aware but not yet wise enough to understand. Three thousand miles away at college at the time, I'd talked to my dad on the phone the day before. Our conversation seemed typical: He'd urged me to do well in school,...



FDA approves use of Eliquis to treat leg, lung clots


(Reuters) - Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and Pfizer Inc on Thursday said U.S. Food and Drug Administration also approved use of the pill to reduce risk of recurrent blood clots in the deep veins of the leg, called deep vein thrombosis, and in the lung, called pulmonary embolism, following initial therapy.

Why American Ebola Survivor Got So Many Hugs


Hospital staff hugged Dr. Kent Brantly to show public he's not contagious.

Ethical experts urge 'fair' sharing of Ebola test drugs


Medicins Sans Frontieres staff members wear protective clothing at a medical center in Kailahun, on August 14, 2014The limited doses of Ebola trial drugs must not be reserved for the well-off or well-connected, two medical ethics experts said on Thursday as two American doctors treated with an experimental serum were pronounced cured. "Fair selection of participants is essential," Ezekiel Emanuel of the University of Pennsylvania and Annette Rid of Kings College London wrote in The Lancet medical journal. "Health-care workers are often well-off and have special ties to the medical establishment," said Emanuel and Rid.



Ebola Drug's Role in Americans' Recoveries Remains Unclear


American Ebola survivor Dr. Kent Brantly credited doctors, God and an experimental drug for his recovery today. But experts say it’s unclear whether the drug, known as ZMapp, helped or hindered his recovery.

Ireland testing dead person recently in Africa for Ebola


Ireland is testing a dead person who recently returned from Africa for the Ebola virus, the Health Service Executive (HSE) of Ireland said on Thursday. Appropriate infection control procedures are being put in place in the community and at the mortuary in the north-west county of Donegal where the person's remains lie, pending the outcome of laboratory tests, the HSE said. "The public health department was made aware earlier today of the remains of an individual, discovered early this morning, who had recently traveled to one of the areas in Africa affected by the current Ebola virus disease outbreak," it said.

Ebola response of MSF and 'boiling frog' WHO under scrutiny


By Misha Hussain DAKAR (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - A decade ago, scientists would have laughed at the idea of Ebola as a public health emergency of international concern. Ebola, a rare tropical disease, has killed almost as many people in 6 months as in the previous 40 years. Experimental vaccines and treatments are available, but months away from use by the estimated 30,000 people who could have benefited from them, according to Nature magazine.  “I would have laughed if you had said Ebola would be a global public health emergency,” said David Heymann, who was working with the CDC team in 1976 when the deadly virus was first recorded close to the River Ebola in Democratic Republic of Congo, then Zaire. “Ebola outbreaks can be stopped with a robust response.” Since 1976, 25 Ebola outbreaks have occurred throughout Africa.

New restrictions on hydrocodone to take effect


WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government is finalizing new restrictions on hundreds of medicines containing hydrocodone, the highly addictive painkiller that has grown into the most widely prescribed drug in the U.S.

South Africa's Adcock jumps on news Bidvest looking to lift stake


A man walks past the Adcock Ingram offices in JohannesburgShares of South Africa's Adcock Ingram surged more than 4 percent in early trade on Friday on news top shareholder Bidvest Group is looking to raise its stake in the drugmaker. Bidvest, a conglomerate with businesses ranging from mops to shipping, owns 34.5 percent of Adcock, South Africa's second-largest drugmaker. Bidvest intends to increase that to more than 50 percent, according to a document from South Africa's competition regulator seen by Reuters on Thursday. "The Bidvest bid has involved two stages.



After food safety scares, China retailer offers baby milk insurance


Local industry and commerce administrative bureau personnel check Sanlu formula milk products at a supermarket in ZaozhuangBy Clare Baldwin and Diana Chan HONG KONG (Reuters) - A Chinese retailer is offering insurance to customers who buy infant milk powder, highlighting the lengths to which companies are going to address concerns about food safety in China. Suning Commerce Group Ltd, which owns the Redbaby chain of stores, told Reuters it had launched the policy this week, backed by China's second largest insurer Ping An Insurance Group. The policy stipulates that if a brand of milk powder is recalled, customers who bought cans from any Redbaby store or its e-commerce website would be paid up to 2,000 yuan ($325) per can, with payments capped at 100,000 yuan. "In recent years, the milk powder market in China has been in a mess," Suning said in an email.



WHO holding talks next month on Ebola treatments


Physician demonstrates testing of blood sample at quarantine station for patients with infectious diseases in BerlinThe World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Thursday it would convene talks early next month on potential treatments and vaccines to contain the deadly Ebola outbreak in West Africa. The infectious disease has killed 1,350 people among 2,473 cases in four countries - Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone - according to the United Nations health agency. The WHO this month backed the use of untested drugs on people infected with Ebola, but the scarcity of supplies has raised questions about who gets priority access to treatment. "The consultation has been convened to gather expertise about the most promising experimental therapies and vaccines and their role in containing the Ebola outbreak in West Africa," it said in a statement on the talks set for Sept. 4-5 in Geneva.



Watch: Girl Saved by Anonymous Donor Meets Her 'One in the World' Match


Girl with rare disease finds only person in the entire world able to be a perfect match.

At least 70 dead from hemorrhagic illness in northern Congo- WHO


DAKAR (Reuters) - At least 70 people have died in northern Democratic Republic of Congo from an outbreak of hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Thursday, denying that the illness was Ebola. "This is not Ebola," a WHO spokesman said in an email to Reuters on Thursday. A WHO report dated Thursday and seen by Reuters said that 592 people had contracted the disease, of whom 70 died.

American Ebola doc urges help fighting outbreak


Ebola victim Dr. Kent Brantly, right, hugs a member of the medical staff that treated him, after being released from Emory University Hospital Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014, in Atlanta. Another American aid worker, Nancy Writebol, who was also infected with the Ebola virus, was released from the hospital Tuesday. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)ATLANTA (AP) — As one of few Ebola survivors with medical expertise, Dr. Kent Brantly seems keenly aware of the position his painful experience has put him in. He hasn't spoken yet about his plans, but spent much of his first public appearance pleading for help for countries still struggling with the virus.



Lack of leadership hurts Ebola fight in West Africa: MSF


Health workers wear protective clothing before carrying an abandoned dead body presenting with Ebola symptoms at Duwala market in MonroviaBy Stephanie Nebehay GENEVA (Reuters) - Efforts to curb the deadly Ebola epidemic that swept across four West African states are being undermined by a lack of leadership and emergency management skills, the international head of Medecins sans Frontieres (MSF) said on Thursday. In an interview, Joanne Liu also said the world's worst ever outbreak of Ebola has caused widespread panic and the collapse of health care systems particularly in Liberia, where pregnant women have lost babies while seeking a safe place to deliver.



Africa tightens Ebola travel curbs as affected countries face food shortages


Health workers wearing protective masks and gloves gesture as they talk at the Felix Houphouet Boigny international airport in AbidjanBy Clair MacDougall MONROVIA (Reuters) - African countries tightened travel curbs on Thursday in an effort to contain the Ebola outbreak, ignoring World Health Organization warnings that such measures could heighten shortages of food and basic supplies in affected areas. In the West Point slum in Liberia's capital Monrovia, the scene of violent clashes with the army on Wednesday after the area was quarantined to curb the spread of Ebola, hundreds of people jostled their way towards trucks loaded with water and rice. I feel bad," said Hawa Saah, a pregnant 23-year-old resident of West Point, speaking in the pidgin English common to this part of West Africa. The World Food Programme says deliveries of basic supplies to more than 1 million people across Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone are intended to avoid a food crisis in those West African countries, where more than 1,300 people have died from Ebola in the worst outbreak of the disease in history.



U.S. aid workers who survived Ebola leave Atlanta hospital


Brantly, who contracted the deadly Ebola virus, smiles during a press conference at Emory University Hospital in AtlantaBy Rich McKay ATLANTA (Reuters) - Appearing thin but smiling, a Texas doctor who weeks ago entered an Atlanta hospital in a full-body biohazard suit to be treated for Ebola said on Thursday he was "thrilled to be alive" as doctors declared him virus-free and safe for release. Dr. Kent Brantly's release came two days after a second U.S. The announcement of their release and expected full recovery from a disease that has killed 1,350 people in West Africa prompted an emotional scene in Atlanta. Hospital workers cheered, clapped and cried as a thin but steady Brantly entered a news conference holding his wife Amber's hand.



Australia defends detention of child asylum seekers


Sri Lankan asylum seekers who were sent back by Australia wait to enter a magistrate's court in GalleAustralia's immigration minister defended his country's tough policies on asylum seekers on Friday, saying measures including the detention of children and denial of permanent visas were needed to stop dangerous people-smuggling ventures. Scott Morrison was giving evidence to an Australian Human Rights Commission (HRC) inquiry into the wellbeing of children in immigration detention centers on the Australian mainland and on remote islands in the Pacific and Indian oceans. "Children being detained in facilities has been a consequence of the policies that more broadly have been effective in securing Australia's borders, restoring the integrity of our immigration program and stopping children dying at sea," Morrison told the inquiry. About 16,000 asylum seekers came to Australia on 220 boats in the first seven months of 2013, but the government says there has been just one "illegal" boat arrival since December.



Senegal closes border as UN warns on Ebola flare-up


A Liberian soldier watches as policemen deploy in Monrovia's West Point slum as part of quarantine measures to contain the spread of Ebola on August 20, 2014Senegal has become the latest country to seal its border with a west African neighbour to ward off the deadly Ebola virus, as the new UN pointman on the epidemic said preparations must be made for a possible flare-up of the disease. Senegal's decision to close its land border with Guinea, announced by the interior ministry Thursday, is part of intensifying efforts to contain the outbreak that has killed 1,350 people since March in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone. David Nabarro, a British physician who the United Nations appointed last week to coordinate the global response to the crisis, arrived in west Africa on a mission to revitalise the health sectors of affected countries.



Calif. bill would pay for lawyers for unaccompanied minor immigrants


California Governor Jerry Brown adjusts his earpiece during a news conference at Memoria y Tolerancia museum in Mexico CityCalifornia would spend $3 million on lawyers for unaccompanied minors arriving in California from Central America under a proposal announced Thursday by top California Democrats. Democratic Governor Jerry Brown, along with Attorney General Kamala Harris and the leaders of both houses of the legislature, said they planned to submit legislation authorizing the expenditure to help children who have been streaming over borders in Southwest states since last fall. “It is critical that these children, many of whom are fleeing extreme violence in Central America, have access to due process and adequate legal representation.?” Central American children began flooding the border at crossing points in Texas earlier this year, overwhelming local officials and leading the federal government to send thousands to other states for processing. By the end of June, about 3,000 of the children had been sent to California, and more have come since.



Scientist Dawkins in Twitter storm over Down's Syndrome


Scientist Richard Dawkins has apologised for causing a "feeding frenzy" on Twitter after he said it would be immoral not to abort a foetus with Down's SyndromeScientist Richard Dawkins apologised on Thursday for causing a "feeding frenzy" on Twitter after he said it would be immoral not to abort a foetus with Down's Syndrome. Dawkins, who has been at the centre of a series of controversies on social media, responded to a user who said they would face a "real ethical dilemma" if they discovered they were expecting a baby with Down's Syndrome.



American Ebola doc: 'I am thrilled to be alive'


ATLANTA (AP) — At least one of the two American aid workers who were infected with the Ebola virus was to be discharged Thursday from an Atlanta hospital, a spokeswoman for the aid group he was working for said.

Two American Ebola patients leave hospital


Undated photo obtained on July 30, 2014 courtesy of Samaritan's Purse shows Dr. Kent Brantly near the Liberian capital MonroviaTwo American missionaries who were sickened with Ebola while working in Liberia and were treated with an experimental drug are doing better and have left the hospital, doctors said Thursday. Doctor Kent Brantly, 33, and Nancy Writebol, 60, both Christian aid workers, were infected with Ebola in Monrovia last month as the largest outbreak in history swept West Africa. They were airlifted to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia for treatment in special isolation units three weeks ago. "The discharge from the hospital of both these patients poses no public health threat," said Bruce Ribner, director of Emory's Infectious Disease Unit.



U.S. to tighten restrictions on common opioid painkillers


The move comes as health and law enforcement officials try to curb a rising tide of prescription drug abuse. Nearly three out of four prescription drug overdoses are caused by opioid painkillers, according to federal data. "Almost seven million Americans abuse controlled-substance prescription medications, including opioid painkillers, resulting in more deaths from prescription drug overdoses than auto accidents," DEA Administrator Michele Leonhart said in a statement announcing the move on Thursday. In the future, products such as Vicodin that combine hydrocodone with another substance such as acetaminophen or aspirin, will be classed as Schedule II products, in line with the opioids oxycodone and morphine.

Global warming 'hiatus' means heat is hiding in ocean


An apparent slowdown in the Earth's surface warming in the last 15 years could be due to that heat being trapped in the deep Atlantic and Southern Ocean, researchers sayAn apparent slowdown in the Earth's surface warming in the last 15 years could be due to that heat being trapped in the deep Atlantic and Southern Ocean, researchers said Thursday. The findings in the journal Science suggest that such cycles tend to last 20-35 years, and that global warming will likely pick up again once that heat returns to surface waters. "Every week there's a new explanation of the hiatus," said co-author Ka-Kit Tung, a University of Washington professor of applied mathematics and adjunct faculty member in atmospheric sciences. Tung and Xianyao Chen of the Ocean University of China studied deep-sea temperatures from floats that sample the water as deep as 6,500 feet (2,000 meters) depth.



AA can help young adults, but mechanisms unclear: study


By Krystnell Storr NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Alcoholics Anonymous can help people, young and old, recover from drinking problems, but young adults seem to benefit mainly - and only - from certain aspects of the program, according to a small U.S. The results may help to better tailor AA for a new generation, researchers say, and help young adults feel more comfortable in the heart of the program, the group meetings. “We now know that in addition to the mechanisms we traditionally target, there may be other mechanisms that are particularly important for younger people,” said Bettina Hoeppner, a psychologist at Harvard University in Boston, Massachusetts, who led the study. Hoeppner and her team write that young people - who may face more temptations to drink in a social context and have shorter addiction histories, and hence less to share - may face a “barrier” to becoming engaged with the values of AA.

Deadline to clear up health law eligibility near


FILE - This Nov. 29, 2013, file photo shows a part of the HealthCare.gov website, photographed in Washington. The administration is warning hundreds of thousands of consumers they risk losing taxpayer-subsidized health insurance unless they act quickly to resolve issues about their citizenship and immigration status. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — The clock is ticking for hundreds of thousands of people who have unresolved issues affecting their coverage under the new health care law.



Ebola: Questions, answers about an unproven drug


WASHINGTON (AP) — An experimental Ebola drug has been used to treat two American aid workers and a Spanish missionary priest. Could Liberian doctors be next?

Texas abortion law could send women across borders


The Women's Reproductive clinic is seen in Santa Teresa, New Mexico, Monday, Aug. 11, 2014. If the new abortion law, one of the toughest in the nation, is upheld by a federal judge, the only remaininc abortion clinic in El Paso, across the state border from Santa Teresa, will be forced to close due to new requirements and women will have to travel hundreds of miles or go to New Mexico to obtain an abortion. (AP Photo/Juan Carlos Llorca)EL PASO, Texas (AP) — Crossing borders is a part of life in El Paso in far West Texas, where people may walk into Mexico to visit family or commute to New Mexico for work. But getting an abortion doesn't require leaving town.



Nigerian who died in UAE tests negative for Ebola


Some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion is revealed in this undated handout colorized transmission electron micrographA Nigerian woman with cancer who died in the Emirati capital this week has tested negative for Ebola, the Health Authority of Abu Dhabi said. The 35-year-old woman with advanced cancer had been travelling via Abu Dhabi airport when her health deteriorated. When medics tried to resuscitate her, the patient had shown signs that may have been consistent with the Ebola virus. "Some of her signs during resuscitation, although explainable by her medical condition, could also have been caused by Ebola virus, and hence this diagnosis needed to be excluded," the authority said in a statement according to the state WAM news agency on Thursday.



Does oil pulling work?


Starting the day off at the beach with your skin smelling of tropical-scented sunscreen can be one of life's greatest pleasures. Smelling coconut oil as you swish it around in your mouth before work -- well, that's another story.

One drink. 8 cookies. Same sugar.



'Suicide tourism' to Switzerland has doubled


More than 600 people traveled to Switzerland for the "sole purpose of committing suicide" between 2008 and 2012.

Are your medical records at risk?


Here's what you need to know if your records are stored electronically (and they probably are).

Menopause: What you're not asking (but should!)


Menopause: the permanent end of fertility (and periods!) that commonly happens to women in their late 40s and 50s. For many women, just saying the word can increase anxiety levels.

School lunches face tough taste test


The USDA says 1 million fewer students nationwide are eating federal school lunches since nutrition guidelines were enacted in 2012.

Visually impaired kids play kickball


This kickball team uses its hearing instead of eyesight to play the game.

6 yoga poses to help with sciatic nerve pain


Sciatica is a real pain in the butt -- and sometimes also in the leg and foot. See six yoga poses that can help provide sciatic pain relief.

Hypnosis helps mom lose 140 pounds


A dream vacation to Hawaii sounded like a nightmare to Julie Evans because it involved wearing a bathing suit. So when she got home, she vowed to change.

10 ways you're sabotaging your workout


Not seeing results at the gym? Find out if one of these common exercise culprits is to blame.

Every day for 23 years, I've struggled to breathe


Breathe in.

Where's my orgasm?


According to studies, 43% of women have experienced some form of sexual dysfunction. Here's what you need to know.

Sugar substitutes 101


This next generation seems way more wholesome than its chem-lab predecessors. But are these sugar subs better for you?

10 yoga poses to beat stress


Don't let stress get the best of you! Start your day off right with this yoga sequence for beginners. These 10 yoga poses will have you feeling refreshed in no time.

You NEED the corner office


Exposure to daylight improves workers mood, communication abilities, effectiveness on the job, sleep, and overall health.

Could blood test predict suicides?


Approximately 36,000 deaths are caused by suicide each year in the United States. What if a simple blood test could one day help prevent that from happening?

Spanking's effect on kids' brains


Researchers say physical punishment actually alters the brain -- not only in an "I'm traumatized!" kind of way, but also in an "I literally have less gray matter in my brain!" kind of way.

The best way to brush


CNN's Martha Shade reports on what's the best way to brush your teeth.

Still smoking after cancer


CNN's Holly Firfer tells us that some people who have beat cancer continue to smoke.

How outbreak can start, and end


Dr. Sanjay Gupta describes how "contact tracing" could help stem the tide of an Ebola outbreak.

The healthiest fish to eat?


As our oceans become more polluted, Sally Kohn sits down with Fabien Cousteau to talk about the healthiest fish to eat.

Plastic surgery gone wrong


Dr. Terry Dubrow and Dr. Paul Nassif from E!'s new show "Botched" discuss the risks and complications of plastic surgery.

Ha! Laughter is the best medicine


Scott Weems, author of "Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why," speaks with CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

Sleep more, lose weight


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us how sleeping more can actually help you feel less hungry.

Say 'Hello.' You'll live longer


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us how something as simple, and as nice, as saying "hello" can help you live to 100.

String may help you live to 100


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us how flossing regularly not only helps prevent heart disease but can also help you live to 100.

Twin boys born 24 days apart


Due to a delayed delivery, a set of twins in Massachusetts were born 24 days apart. WCVB's Mary Saladna reports.

Is red meat really bad for you?


CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks with Nina Teicholz, author of "The Big Fat Surprise."

This is your body on weed


Dr. Sanjay Gupta explains how marijuana affects the brain and how pot can be used to treat certain conditions.

See man after 700-lb. loss


Robert Walls tipped the scales at 950 lbs. before he made a big decision that helped him shed hundreds of pounds.

Teacher eats only McDonald's


A teacher only eats McDonald's for 90 days, and LOSES 37 pounds. KCCI reports.

Selfies leading to head lice


Nurses report "selfie" posts are causing an increase in teenagers spreading lice.

World's most dangerous workout?


Is the "sport of fitness" the world's most dangerous workout? CNN's Jarrett Bellini asks CrossFitters and gives it a go.

Hear Mrs. O rap for healthy foods


First lady Michelle Obama raps about food at an event to propose limits on the types of foods advertised in schools.

Brain dead: What it is, what it isn't


CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta explains how doctors determine if a patient is brain dead.

American Ebola patients released


Nancy Writebol and Dr. Kent Brantly, who contracted the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa, have been released from Emory University Hospital.

Mental health help: Where to turn


Americans often don't know where to turn when dealing with a loved one with serious mental illness, but experts emphsize there are resources available.

Are your medical records safe?


Here's what you need to know if your records are stored electronically (and they probably are).

6 yoga poses for sciatic pain


Sciatica is a real pain in the butt -- and sometimes also in the leg and foot. See six yoga poses that can help provide sciatic pain relief.

Mom loses half her body weight


A dream vacation to Hawaii sounded like a nightmare to Julie Evans because it involved wearing a bathing suit. So when she got home, she vowed to change.

Healthy school lunches put to test


The USDA says 1 million fewer students nationwide are eating federal school lunches since nutrition guidelines were enacted in 2012.

Whiz kids changing medicine


A 10-year-old inventor and a 20-year-old doctor? Meet the whiz kids changing the face of medicine.

Embarrassing diseases are a real pain in the...


There are the diseases you don't want to get because they'll kill you. Then there are the diseases you don't want to get because you are too embarrassed to discuss them out loud, even with your doctor.

Retired teacher loses 200 pounds


"There's another one who will break our equipment," Kathleen Riser overheard one trainer say, pointing at her 350-plus pound frame. Two years later, people now point to Riser as an inspiration.

'Big Ben' loses 145 pounds


After almost two years of strict dieting and exercise Ben's 140lbs lighter. He's lost 38 inches off of his waist and tossed out his 3XL shirts to make room for his new size, large.

Plant-based diet is his secret


For years Benji Kurtz was severely obese. He tried diet after diet. Then the solution to his weight loss problem found him.

Break up with your trainer


After months of personal training, you're still not seeing results. Could it be time to ditch your trainer?

9 nutrition rules for athletes


Follow these nutrition guidelines to ensure your hard work in training pays off.

21 pounds of flesh removed


I am a CNN Fit Nation alumna. I completed the Nautica Malibu Triathlon in 2013 with my Fit Nation teammates. But my journey to health really started more than two years ago.

Venom may hold cure for cancer


How nanotechnology and synthesized venom may hold the key to stopping cancer cell growth.

Avoid the 'back-to-school plague'


Kids get eight to 12 colds or cases of the flu each year. But there are simple ways to keep them healthy.

Get 'em now! 8 summer foods


Farmers markets are brimming with beautiful, ripe produce for the picking, local foods are flooding the supermarket, and it's finally time for juicy berries and stone fruits to take center stage.

Do's and don'ts for summertime sex


The weather doesn't have to be the only thing heating up this month. Summer is an excellent time to recharge and rejuvenate -- and your love life should be no exception.

Ethics: Resolving the Ebola dilemma


What are the ethics of using experimental treatment drugs?

Denmark's homeless 'swap the streets for the pitch'


How football is helping Denmark's homeless

Heart deaths reach 'tipping point'


Parts of Europe are reaching a "tipping point" where cardiovascular disease is no longer the leading cause of death, a study shows.

Thousands 'eligible for Ebola drugs'


Around 30,000 people could have been eligible for drugs in the current Ebola outbreak - if they had been available, a report in Nature suggests.

Hospital hack 'exploited Heartbleed'


A leading security expert alleges that hackers made use of the Heartbleed flaw to steal the personal details of 4.5 million healthcare patients.

Breastfeeding 'cuts depression risk'


Breastfeeding can halve the risk of post-natal depression, according to a study of nearly 14,000 new mothers.

Brain stimulation 'helps in stroke'


Stimulating the part of the brain which controls movement may help people recover from strokes.

Depression with Parkinson's 'common'


Depression and anxiety are twice as common in people newly-diagnosed with Parkinson's disease compared to the general population, research suggests.

Prostate drug ruling 'a fiasco'


Patients say that the decision by the NHS in England to reject a treatment for men who have prostate cancer is a "fiasco".

Sharp rise in CT scans on children


An expert panel says the number of CT scans performed each year is rising exponentially and more data is needed to assess their impact on health.

Obesity 'linked to 10 cancers'


Being overweight raises the risk of developing some of the most common cancers, according to a study of more than five million adults in the UK.

VIDEO: Hey presto: Magic therapy for kids


Young people with hemiplegia, a condition which results in one side of the body being weaker than the other, have been taking part in a magic camp in London.

'No clear advice on tooth brushing'


Advice on the best way to brush teeth for adults and children is confusing and inconsistent, according to a study from University College London.

Ebola: Why is it this disease we fear?


Why does Ebola cause more concern than other diseases?

The man who helped save 50 million lives


The man who helped save 50m people

VIDEO: Anastacia talks big and little things


Singer songwriter Anastacia tells BBC Breakfast about her post mastectomy experience and new album 'Resurrection'

AUDIO: Tributes as yoga guru dies at 95


Yoga instructor Varuna Shunglu pays tribute to the yoga guru BKS Iyengar, who has died at the age of 95.

VIDEO: Inside Liberia Ebola treatment centre


Following earlier denials, Liberia has admitted that 17 suspected Ebola patients are "missing" after a health centre in the capital was looted.

VIDEO: Trapeze lessons 'help beat depression'


Women suffering from depression are being encouraged to attend a trapeze exercise class to help manage their symptoms.

VIDEO: Airport adopts infrared Ebola 'test'


The BBC's Tomi Oladipo has been speaking to people in Nigeria's most populous city Lagos as the authorities take measures to prevent the spread of the Ebola virus.

VIDEO: 'Mental illness can happen to anyone'


Sam Bailey spoke to BBC News about his experiences with depression.

VIDEO: Danish sausage link to listeria deaths


Officials in Denmark say they suspect a pork sausage contaminated with listeria bacteria is to blame for the deaths of at least 12 people.

VIDEO: Anorexia: research into DNA link


Scientists in the UK are examining the DNA of people who have had anorexia to try to find out more about the condition.

Trauma warning on Foley death video


Will watching a violent death online cause long-term psychological distress?

The economic impact of Ebola


Ebola crisis has serious financial effect on West Africa

How safe is eating meat?


Doctor puts a high-meat diet to the test

Lesser-known things about Asperger's syndrome


Lesser-known things about Asperger's syndrome

The 30-year-old health billionaire


The 30-year-old health billionaire you've probably never heard of

Ebola: Mapping the outbreak


Mapping the outbreak in West Africa

'My beautiful Down's son'


Should pregnant mothers be told about 'chance' instead of 'risk'?

Robin Williams and the link between comedy and depression


Why do many comedians struggle with depression?

Double vaccines 'could end polio'


Using both types of polio vaccine could speed up efforts to free the world of the crippling and potentially fatal disease, research suggests.

US Ebola patients out of hospital


One of the US aid workers who recovered from the Ebola virus says he is "thrilled to be alive" as he and another patient are discharged from hospital.

Botox may have cancer fighting role


Botox injections - beloved by those seeking a wrinkle-free complexion - may help fight cancer, early animal studies suggest.

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