Health News
7/24/2014

The Untouched Generation


The Untouched Generation



FTC commissioner warns on mobile health-data gathering


Federal Trade Commissioner Julie Brill, speaking in Washington on Wednesday, expressed concern about the way apps on smartphones and mobile devices are siphoning sensitive health data, and how some of that information may then be shared with third parties. The debate around the gathering of consumer data is intensifying as Silicon Valley tech companies take a more active interest in mobile health. Apple Inc and Google Inc revealed new health-focused services for apps developers in recent months, dubbed Google Fit and HealthKit. Brill's comments followed a May report in which the FTC revealed the results of a study of mobile health-app developers, which found that a good portion collect consumer health data and give it to third-party entities.

Abuse of U.S. generic-drug rules costs billions: report


By Diane Bartz WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. rules that ensure prescription medicines are not misused have been manipulated by brand-name drug companies to fight off generic competitors, costing consumers billions of dollars, according to a report released on Wednesday. Called "risk evaluation and mitigation strategies" (REMS), these U.S. Food and Drug Administration rules are meant to secure the safe distribution of dangerous medicines. This has delayed the arrival of 40 potential generic drugs, costing consumers some $5.4 billion a year, according to the report by Matrix Global Advisors and released by the generic drug trade group.

S. Korea reports first foot-and-mouth case for 3 years


South Korea confirms its first case of foot-and-mouth in more than three yearsSouth Korea on Thursday confirmed its first case of foot-and-mouth in more than three years, and just two months after the country was declared free of the disease. South Korea had just regained its status as an FMD-free country in May at a meeting of the World Organisation for Animal Health in Paris. The entire Korean peninsula suffered a devastating outbreak in 2011 that resulted in the culling of nearly 3.5 million cattle, pigs and other animals in South Korea alone.



Toll rising from drug users in Russian-annexed Crimea


Flowers are placed near a sign at the AIDS Conference in Melbourne on July 22, 2014 as a memorial for those killed onboard Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 after it crashed in east UkraineRussia's annexation of Crimea has led to a surge in deaths among intravenous drug users, who no longer have access to vital therapy, specialists said at the world AIDS forum on Thursday. Michel Kazatchkine, former head of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria, and now the UN's AIDS envoy for eastern Europe, told AFP he was "very concerned" and had heard of "20 documented deaths, possibly more." Under Ukrainian rule, Crimea provided intravenous drug users with access to methadone, a safer substitute for heroin, and to buprenorphine, a drug used to ease dependence. Endorsed by the World Health Organisation (WHO), this opioid substitution therapy (OST) helps to wean addicts off heroin and to halt the spread of HIV through prostitution and shared syringes, according to campaigners.



India's Ipca halts shipments to U.S. from local plant after FDA concerns


By Zeba Siddiqui MUMBAI (Reuters) - India's Ipca Laboratories Ltd said on Thursday it has voluntarily suspended shipments to the United States from one of its drug ingredient manufacturing plants after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) expressed concerns regarding the unit. Ipca, a mid-sized generic drugs and ingredients maker, said the FDA issued a so-called "Form 483", a letter in which the agency typically outlines violations of its guidelines observed during inspections of manufacturing plants. Ipca did not give details about the contents of the Form 483 that it had received. Over the past year, large Indian drugmakers such as Ranbaxy Laboratories Ltd and Wockhardt Ltd have been hit by a spate of regulatory sanctions due to concerns about production processes at their local plants.

South Korea confirms hog foot-and-mouth outbreak


South Korea has confirmed a case of foot-and-mouth disease at a hog farm, the country's first outbreak in more than three years, the agriculture ministry said in a statement on Thursday. The case comes as Asia's fourth-largest economy strives to contain a six-month outbreak of bird flu, which has pushed pork prices to multi-year highs due to demand for alternative meat. Testing confirmed a foot-and-mouth case at a hog farm in Uiseong county, more than 250 km (155 miles) southeast of Seoul, said statements from the ministry and the Gyeonsangbuk-do provincial government. The pork imports are already high after South Korea's worst nationwide outbreak of foot-and-mouth in 2010-2011 led to the culling of a third of the hog population.

Surgeons remove 232 teeth from Indian teenager


teeth removed from 17-year-old Ashik GavaiAshik Gavai, 17, sought medical help for a swelling on the right side of his lower jaw and the case was referred to the city's JJ Hospital, where they found he was suffering from a condition known as complex odontoma, head of dentistry Sunanda Dhivare-Palwankar told AFP. The youngster's father, Suresh Gavai, said that the family had been worried that Ashik's swelling was a cancerous growth. "I was worried that it may turn out to be cancer so I brought him to Mumbai," Gavai told the Mumbai Mirror newspaper. "I think it could be a world record," she said.



Australian injecting room upholds fight against AIDS epidemic


A security guard stands at the entrance of the Sydney Medically Supervised Injecting Centre in Kings Cross on July 23, 2014Nestled among the bars and strip clubs of Sydney's Kings Cross is a service which not only saves lives, but continues the pragmatic approach which prevented a HIV epidemic among drug-users in Australia. Behind a nondescript shopfront is the Sydney Medically Supervised Injecting Centre -- the only place in the southern hemisphere where users can inject heroin and other drugs under the care of registered nurses. "We know the evidence behind needle syringe programmes and the benefits they have in terms of prevention," says the centre's medical director Marianne Jauncey. "In Australia, for instance, they have very clearly prevented an epidemic of HIV among people who inject drugs.



China reopens town sealed after plague death


This Centers For Disease Control (CDC) image shows the bubonic plague, a bacterial infection which killed tens of millions of people in 14th-century EuropeA Chinese town sealed off after a man died of plague re-opened on Thursday after authorities found no further cases of the illness, state media said. Authorities barred 30,000 people living in Yumen in the northwestern province of Gansu from leaving, while road blocks prevented others from entering, after a 38-year-old died from plague last week. "We have not discovered any new plague cases," the state-run China News service cited Gansu's health bureau as saying. It added that authorities had exterminated rodents and fleas in designated quarantine zones, while 151 close contacts of the man had been kept in isolation for nine days without showing symptoms.



U.S. health insurers to pay $330 million in premium rebates


A woman picks up a leaflet at a health insurance enrollment event in Cudahy, California(Reuters) - U.S. health insurers will send out about $330 million in rebates to employers and individuals this summer under President Barack Obama's healthcare law, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said on Thursday. The law, often called Obamacare, requires insurance companies to refund customers when they spend less than 80 percent or 85 percent of healthcare premiums they collect for medical care. The rebates will go to about 6.8 million people and have a value of about $80 per family. They are to be sent by Aug. 1 either directly to consumers or to the employer providing the health coverage, who is required to pass the savings onto employees, the agency said in a report.



Arizona inmate takes nearly two hours to die in botched execution


Joseph Wood is pictured in this undated handout booking photoBy David Schwartz PHOENIX (Reuters) - An Arizona inmate took almost two hours to die by lethal injection on Wednesday and his lawyers said he "gasped and snorted" before succumbing in the latest botched execution to raise questions about the death penalty in the United States. The execution of convicted double murderer Joseph Wood began at 1:52 p.m. at a state prison complex, and the 55-year-old was pronounced dead just shy of two hours later at 3:49 p.m., the Arizona attorney general's office said. The appeal, which said the procedure violated his constitutional right to be executed without suffering cruel and unusual punishment, was denied by Justice Anthony Kennedy of the U.S. Supreme Court. "Arizona appears to have joined several other states who have been responsible for an entirely preventable horror: a bungled execution.



Childhood traumas more common in military members


CHICAGO (AP) — Childhood traumas are more common among military members and veterans than among civilians, according to a new study. Researchers say the results support the notion that for some, enlistment serves as an escape from troubled upbringings.

Colorado theater gunman's lawyers challenge firearms analysis


Accused Aurora theater gunman James Holmes listens during his arraignment in CentennialBy Keith Coffman DENVER (Reuters) - Lawyers defending accused theater gunman James Holmes challenged the reliability of firearms analysis on Wednesday, despite conceding that their client was solely responsible for the 2012 massacre that killed 12 moviegoers. In a hearing before Arapahoe County District Court Judge Carlos Samour, public defenders sought to have expert ballistics testimony precluded from the onetime neuroscience graduate student's murder trial. Dale Higashi, an agent with the Colorado Bureau of Investigation, said all the bullet fragments and shell casings that he analyzed from the crime scene could be traced to three of the weapons belonging to Holmes. Defense lawyers argued that firearms analysis is subjective, and not based on quantifiable scientific fact.



Sterling marriage 'stress' at issue as L.A. Clippers trial nears end


Los Angeles Clippers NBA basketball team owner Donald Sterling attends the Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly HillsBy Eric Kelsey LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling's bid to block the $2 billion sale of the NBA team in a probate trial entered its final stretch on Wednesday when his attorneys sought to prove his estranged wife improperly seized control of the franchise. Sterling's attorneys called only two witnesses during the emotionally charged trial that will determine whether the 80-year-old real estate billionaire' s wife had the authority to sell the Clippers to former Microsoft Corp chief executive Steve Ballmer. A neurologist called by Sterling's attorneys testified that Sterling, who has been banned by the NBA for racist remarks, was under undue stress from his wife Shelly Sterling, 79, while taking the mental exams that declared him incapable of managing his business affairs. "There is a stress in the relationship between Mr. and Mrs. Sterling, and you wouldn't want that stress to impact a mental status investigation," neurologist Jeffrey Cummings told Los Angeles Superior Court.



San Francisco approves soda tax for November ballot


Cans of soda are displayed at Kwik Stops Liquor in San DiegoBy Jennifer Baires SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - San Francisco city leaders have approved a measure for the November ballot that would place a two-cents-per-ounce municipal tax on sodas and other sugary beverages, hoping to become the first major city to successfully impose such a levy. Among them have been Richmond, California, across the bay from San Francisco, where a penny-an-ounce tax was defeated after a multimillion-dollar campaign by the American Beverage Association. San Francisco's plan, which was approved on Tuesday night by a 6-4 vote of the board of supervisors, would be applied to any nonalcoholic, sweetened drink with more than 25 calories per 12 ounces. "I think the nation is watching what happens here," said John Maa, a surgeon on the board of directors at two organizations that support the measure, San Francisco Medical Society and American Heart Association.



EU finds 'morning after pills' work, regardless of a woman's weight


Emergency contraceptives, known as the "morning after pill", remain suitable for all women who need them, regardless of a woman’s weight, European regulators said on Thursday. The European Medicines Agency had questioned whether the contraceptives worked as effectively in women weighing more than 75 kg, but its experts concluded that the benefits of using them outweighed the risks. “Women should be reassured that regardless of their body weight, emergency contraceptives can still be used to prevent unintended pregnancy," said Sarah Branch, of Britain's drugs watchdog the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency.

Militants order female genital mutilation in Iraq: U.N.


This Tuesday, July 22, 2014 photo shows a motorist passing by a flag of the Islamic State group in central Rawah, 175 miles (281 kilometers) northwest of Baghdad, Iraq, nearly six weeks since a Sunni militant blitz led by the Islamic State extremist group seized large swaths of northern and western Iraq. (AP Photo)Militant group Islamic State has ordered all girls and women in and around Iraq's northern city of Mosul to undergo female genital mutilation, the United Nations said on Thursday. The "fatwa" issued by the Sunni Muslim fighters would potentially affect 4 million women and girls, U.N. resident and humanitarian coordinator in Iraq Jacqueline Badcock told reporters in Geneva by videolink from Arbil. "This is something very new for Iraq, particularly in this area, and is of grave concern and does need to be addressed," she said. "This is not the will of Iraqi people, or the women of Iraq in these vulnerable areas covered by the terrorists," she added.



Lithuania to slaughter 20,000 pigs as swine fever spreads


Lithuanian authorities on Thursday ordered the slaughter of 19,400 pigs at one of the country's largest farms as an outbreak of African swine fever (ASF) in the region spread. It was first case of ASF to be found in farm pigs in the Baltic country, Chief Veterinary Officer Jonas Milius said, amid an outbreak in which cases have appeared in neighboring countries. Poland has also reported ASF cases at farm pigs near its border with Belarus. ASF was found after pigs in the Rupinskai farm near the Belarusia and Latvia borders began dying in larger numbers than usual on Wednesday, the farm's owner, Danish firm Idavang, said.

U.N. rights body criticizes Ireland on abortion, church homes


A woman holds a candlelit vigil outside University Hospital Galway in GalwayBy Padraic Halpin DUBLIN (Reuters) - A United Nations human rights panel has told Ireland it should revise its highly restrictive abortion laws and that allegations of abuse of women and children at Catholic-run homes must be better investigated. Following months of polarizing debate in the Roman Catholic country, Ireland's parliament voted to allow limited access to abortion for the first time last year but restricted it to cases when a woman's life is in danger. The U.N. Human Rights Committee remained highly critical of the law, saying Ireland should revise it to provide for additional exceptions in cases of rape, incest, serious risks to the health of the mother, or fatal fetal abnormality. "The Committee reiterates its previous concern regarding the highly restrictive circumstances under which women can lawfully have an abortion in the state," it said following hearings last week when Committee Chairman Nigel Rodley said Irish law treated women who were raped as a "a vessel and nothing more".



Massachusetts monks tap brewing tradition to support aging members


Trappist Monks pray during a service at Saint Joseph's Abbey in SpencerBy Scott Malone SPENCER Mass. (Reuters) - Tucked off a two-lane highway in a hilly, wooded section of central Massachusetts, a group of Roman Catholic monks has embraced a centuries-old tradition they hope can sustain their aging members in a world of rapidly rising health costs. "We're trying to reinvent our economy," said Father Isaac Keeley on a recent tour of the abbey's low-slung stone buildings and starkly modern 30,000-square-foot brewery, nestled in a wooded property some 60 miles (97 km) west of Boston. "The health costs are huge," said Father Dominic Whedbee, the abbey's 65-year-old prior, the group's second-ranking member.



Chinese police arrest man after nursing home patients castrated


Police in China have arrested a man on suspicion of castrating or partially castrating four patients at a nursing home, state media said on Thursday, the latest scandal to hit the country's medical sector. Doctors discovered on Tuesday that three men at the nursing home in the northeastern province of Heilongjiang had had either one or both of their testicles removed with a blunt razor, the official Xinhua news agency reported.

Britain files criminal charges against Alstom UK unit


The logo of French power and transport engineering company Alstom is pictured on the roof of the company's plant in ReichshoffenBritain's leading fraud prosecutor on Thursday charged a British subsidiary of French engineering group Alstom with three offences of corruption and three offences of conspiracy to corrupt after a five-year investigation. The charges by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO), flagged by the agency's head David Green in a Reuters interview on Wednesday, come just weeks after the French parent agreed a 12.4 billion euro (9.8 billion pounds) sale of most of its power business to U.S. conglomerate General Electric (GE). Officials for Alstom in Paris declined to comment. The charges against Alstom Network UK relate to large transport projects in India, Poland and Tunisia carried out between June 2000 and November 2006, the agency said.



China probes food businesses; Hong Kong bans imports in meat safety scare


A security personnel stands guard in front of an OSI's food processing plants in LangfangChina's food regulator has visited close to 600 restaurants, businesses and food distributors as it investigates a fast-spreading food safety scare that has dragged in a number of global brands and hit food outlets as far away as Japan. Hong Kong said on Thursday it suspended, with immediate effect, all imports from the U.S.-owned Chinese supplier at the center of the latest scare. It was unclear when the company last shipped its products to Hong Kong. Shanghai police detained five people on Wednesday, including the head and the quality chief of Shanghai Husi Food, a supplier to foreign fast-food brands including KFC, McDonald's Corp and coffee chain Starbucks Corp over allegations it supplied out-of-date meat.



U.S. paves way for Novartis to copy Amgen biotech drug


Logo of Swiss drugmaker Novartis is seen at its headquarters in Basel(Reuters) - U.S. regulators have accepted an application by Sandoz - the generics arm of Novartis - seeking approval for a copycat version of Amgen's drug Neupogen, or filgrastim, for patients with low white blood cell counts. The Food and Drug Administration's decision to accept the filing under a new pathway for so-called biosimilar drugs marks a milestone in the rollout of cheaper copies of injectable biotech medicines in the United States. Sandoz said on Thursday that overcoming the first hurdle in the approval process was an important step in increasing U.S. patient access to such treatments. The generics company already sells a biosimilar version of Amgen's drug in more than 40 other countries, but the United States has been slower than other markets to establish a regulatory framework for biosimilars.



Atox Bio raises $23 million to fund flesh-eating bacteria treatment


Israel-based Atox Bio, a developer of therapeutics for severe infections, said on Thursday it has raised $23 million in an investment round led by SR One, the healthcare venture capital fund of GlaxoSmithKline. Lundbeck's Lundbeckfond Ventures and OrbiMed Israel also invested. The funds will enable Atox Bio to initiate a late stage clinical study of AB103, for the treatment of necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI), commonly referred to as the "flesh eating bacteria" and other severe infections. AB103 completed a Phase 2 study in patients with NSTI.

EPA: No comment on fracking air pollution


No one at the Environmental Protection Agency has been willing to talk on the record about air pollution associated with fracking in Texas.

Paracetamol no better than placebo in low-back pain: study


Lower-back pain is the leading cause of disability in the world, and paracetamol is "universally" recommended as the treatment of first choice, said a statement carried by The Lancet.Paracetamol, the first-choice lower-back pain killer, worked no better than dummy drugs administered in a trial of more than 1,600 people suffering from the condition, researchers said Thursday. In fact, the median recovery time for those on placebo was a day shorter than that for trial subjects given real medicine, they wrote in The Lancet medical journal. "Our findings suggest that... paracetamol does not affect recovery time compared with placebo in low-back pain, and question the universal endorsement of paracetamol in this patient group," the Australian team concluded. "Paracetamol also had no effect on pain, disability, function, global symptom change, sleep or quality of life."



Cancer Lessons I Learned From a Fictional Teenage Boy


That love scene from "The Fault in Our Stars" is so intense.

Nigeria may have no polio cases next year, says Bill Gates


Gates smiles during an interview in SingaporeBy Edmund Blair NAIROBI (Reuters) - Nigeria could cut the number of polio cases to zero next year and be declared free of the disease in 2018 even though a national eradication campaign has had to contend with an insurgency in the north, Bill Gates told Reuters. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation supports the global initiative to wipe out polio, which includes a campaign in Nigeria, one of three nations where the crippling virus is still endemic. "We have got all the challenges up in northern Nigeria, the violence from Boko Haram, and the distraction of an upcoming election," Gates said in a telephone interview, referring to an Islamist rebel group that has in the past targeted vaccination workers, and to Nigeria's national vote next year. “We hope by the end of next year we’d be at zero." He added that if there were no more cases for three years after that, Nigeria could be certified clear in 2018.



Australian Medical Board bans prominent euthanasia doctor


Prominent Australian right-to-die doctor Philip Nitschke pictured in Sydney on August 27, 2007Prominent Australian right-to-die doctor Philip Nitschke on Thursday vowed to continue giving advice on how to end life after the Australian Medical Board used emergency powers to suspend him. The ruling -- an interim measure pending the outcome of an inquiry -- follows the suicide of Perth man Nigel Brayley who died in May after communicating with Nitschke. Brayley died after taking euthanasia drug Nembutal, which he illegally imported. Police were treating her death as murder and Brayley was reportedly being investigated about his involvement, although he was never named as a suspect.



Paracetamol no better than placebo for low back pain, study finds


By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Paracetamol, a painkiller universally recommended to treat people with acute low back pain, does not speed recovery or reduce pain from the condition, according to the results of a large trial published on Thursday. A study published in The Lancet medical journal found that the popular pain medicine was no better than placebo, or dummy, pills for hastening recovery from acute bouts of low back pain or easing pain levels, function, sleep or quality of life. Researchers said the findings challenge the universal endorsement of paracetamol as the first choice painkiller for lower back pain. "We need to reconsider the universal recommendation to provide paracetamol as a first-line treatment," said Christopher Williams, who led the study at the University of Sydney in Australia.

Roche's breast cancer drugs keep it on track to meet targets


The logo of Swiss pharmaceutical company Roche is seen outside their headquarters in BaselBy Caroline Copley BASEL (Reuters) - Swiss drugmaker Roche confirmed its full-year sales and profit targets on Thursday as growing momentum for its new breast cancer medicines and professional diagnostics products countered the effects of a strong Swiss franc. Unlike other pharmaceutical companies that have been ravaged by patent losses, Roche has yet to face a challenge to its older biotech drugs by makers of copycat treatments and has launched a string of new, expensive cancer medicines. The Basel-based firm hopes these so-called follow-on drugs will help it defend sales in its breast and blood cancer businesses once generic competition arrives. Its strategy looked sound after first-half sales of Perjeta, which targets the same protein found on some cancer cells as Roche's older blockbuster Herceptin, surged 276 percent to 388 million Swiss francs ($429.68 million).



China lifts quarantine after man dies of plague


BEIJING (AP) — A nine-day quarantine imposed on parts of a northern Chinese city where a man died of bubonic plague has been lifted, China's official news agency reported Thursday.

GSK asks European regulator to OK malaria shot


LONDON (AP) — Pharma giant GSK said Thursday it is submitting its malaria vaccine for regulatory approval to the European Medicines Agency.

Head of troubled CDC anthrax lab has resigned


In this Oct. 8, 2013, file photo, a sign marks the entrance to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Michael Farrell head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lab that potentially exposed workers to live anthrax, resigned an agency spokesman said Wednesday, July 23, 2014. Farrell was reassigned following an incident last month at an Atlanta lab that handles bioterrorism agents. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)NEW YORK (AP) — The head of the government lab that potentially exposed workers to live anthrax has resigned, an agency spokesman said Wednesday.



GSK seeks approval for world's first malaria vaccine


The GlaxoSmithKline building is pictured in Hounslow, west LondonBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - GlaxoSmithKline said on Thursday it is applying for regulatory approval for the world's first vaccine against malaria, designed for children in Africa. The British drugmaker said the shot, called RTS,S, is intended exclusively for use outside the European Union but will be evaluated by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in collaboration with the World Health Organisation (WHO). Malaria, a mosquito-borne parasitic disease, kills more than 600,000 people a year, mainly babies in the poorest parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Yet hopes that RTS,S would be the final answer to wiping out malaria were dampened when results from a final-stage trial in babies aged six to 12 weeks showed the shot provided only modest protection, reducing episodes of the disease by 30 percent compared to immunisation with a control vaccine.



EU regulator: Morning-after pill OK for all women


LONDON (AP) — A commonly used morning-after pill is suitable for use by heavier women, the European Medicines Agency said Thursday after a review of the evidence sparked by the French manufacturer's declaration that the drugs didn't work in women weighing more than 80 kilograms (176 pounds).

MERS may be airborne, scientists say


The deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus may be transmitted through the air, according to a new observation paper.

Opinion: Spanking the gray matter out of our kids


Researchers say physical punishment actually alters the brain -- not only in an "I'm traumatized!" kind of way, but also in an "I literally have less gray matter in my brain!" kind of way.

Identifying the genetic roots of schizophrenia


After analyzing the DNA of 150,000 people, scientists say they can pinpoint the genetic roots of schizophrenia.

'Marathon' style helped her lose 100 pounds


When Nicole Durham finally decided it was time to lose weight, she knew she had a long way to go. See her amazing transformation:

Cancer overtreatment must stop


Studies found that a large number of American men with prostate cancer get unnecessary and aggressive treatment, Dr. Otis Brawley says.

Can meditation slow aging?


Researchers are trying to show that meditation could help counter the aging process.

Good habits for a healthy gut


The probiotic bacteria that live in your stomach and intestines help regulate digestion, safeguard your immunity, and even help maintain your weight. Here's how to cultivate the best flora for overall health.

7 things to know about epilepsy


An estimated 2.3 million adults in the United States have epilepsy, according to the CDC. Actress Sky McCole Bartusiak was one of them.

Science limited on the drinking age


On July 17, 1984, President Ronald Reagan signed into law the National Minimum Drinking Age Act, which withheld a percentage of highway funds from any state that didn't raise the minimum drinking age to 21.

Dads' brains change post-kids


Scientists know mothers are neurologically prepared to care for their kids. But fathers' brains can learn to bond too, a new study shows.

Pregnant and she didn't know it


A Seymour, Connecticut, woman gave birth after being pregnant for 9 months with no idea she was carrying a baby.

Say 'Hello.' You'll live longer


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us how something as simple, and as nice, as saying "hello" can help you live to 100.

Men take their health to heart


A father who lost his dad and brother to heart disease intends to avoid the same fate. CNN's Holly Firfer reports.

String may help you live to 100


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us how flossing regularly not only helps prevent heart disease but can also help you live to 100.

Twin boys born 24 days apart


Due to a delayed delivery, a set of twins in Massachusetts were born 24 days apart. WCVB's Mary Saladna reports.

Is red meat really bad for you?


CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks with Nina Teicholz, author of "The Big Fat Surprise."

This is your body on weed


Dr. Sanjay Gupta explains how marijuana affects the brain and how pot can be used to treat certain conditions.

See man after 700-lb. loss


Robert Walls tipped the scales at 950 lbs. before he made a big decision that helped him shed hundreds of pounds.

Teacher eats only McDonald's


A teacher only eats McDonald's for 90 days, and LOSES 37 pounds. KCCI reports.

Selfies leading to head lice


Nurses report "selfie" posts are causing an increase in teenagers spreading lice.

World's most dangerous workout?


Is the "sport of fitness" the world's most dangerous workout? CNN's Jarrett Bellini asks CrossFitters and gives it a go.

Hear Mrs. O rap for healthy foods


First lady Michelle Obama raps about food at an event to propose limits on the types of foods advertised in schools.

Brain dead: What it is, what it isn't


CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta explains how doctors determine if a patient is brain dead.

Chief Ebola doctor contracts the virus


A doctor who has played a key role in fighting the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone has been infected with the deadly disease.

Train like a lady lumberjack


Shana Verstegen started logrolling when she was 7. The sport has made her a six-time world champion and given her six-pack abs.

5 myths about the urge to 'go'


Even though urinary incontinence affects about 25 million Americans and there are many treatment options to improve symptoms, talking about the often unexpected and always urgent need "to go" is still taboo, even with your doctor.

Is your firefighter too fat?


More than 70% of U.S. firefighters are overweight or obese, a rate higher than the American public, according to a recent study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Whole Foods added to recall


Bought fruit at Costco, Trader Joe's, Kroger or Walmart recently? Contamination concerns at a packing plant have stores clearing their shelves.

What Obamacare appeals mean


Two U.S. appeals courts have issued conflicting rulings on Obamacare subsidies. Check out this FAQ.

5 myths about the urge to 'go'


Even though urinary incontinence affects about 25 million Americans and there are many treatment options to improve symptoms, talking about the often unexpected and always urgent need "to go" is still taboo, even with your doctor.

Overweight kids don't see it


CNN's Andy Rose tells us that most overweight children don't perceive themselves that way.

1 drink. 8 cookies. Same sugar.



One drink. 8 cookies. Same sugar.



Vaccines are safe. Seriously.


Children should get vaccinated against preventable and potentially deadly diseases. Period.

Heavy drinker? You'd be surprised


One in 10 deaths among working-age adults are due to excessive alcohol consumption. But what really constitutes "heavy drinking"?

You don't want this surgeon


You might be impressed that your doctor can perform a wide variety of procedures, but sometimes having an expert in just one or two is best, Dr. Anthony Youn says.

Abuse-deterrent painkiller approved


In the painkiller world, oxycodone and naloxone will seem like strange bedfellows. Oxycodone is a powerful painkiller, while naloxone is used to reverse painkiller overdose.

More stores affected by fruit recall


Bought fruit at Costco, Trader Joe's, Kroger or Walmart recently? Contamination concerns at a packing plant have stores clearing their shelves.

CDC lab director resigns after anthrax incident


The head of the bioterror lab involved in potentially exposing dozens of workers to deadly anthrax bacteria has resigned.

Overweight kids don't see it


CNN's Andy Rose tells us that most overweight children don't perceive themselves that way.

What Obamacare court decisions mean for you


Two U.S. appeals courts have issued conflicting rulings on Obamacare subsidies. Check out this FAQ.

You won't believe the 'after' pics


Robert and Jessica Foster lost 160 and 120 pounds respectively after an emotional conversation. See their amazing transformation:

Lost 153 pounds, proved doc wrong


Kerry Hoffman started working out five days a week and tracking calories to go from 343 pounds to 190. See his amazing transformation.

Running, but no longer hiding


After a disastrous 30th, Sarah Evans vowed to enjoy her future birthdays. So she took up running -- and lost 120 pounds.

Get off the sideline, into the race


Only a few short months ago, I was a spectator.

If I can run, so can you


For as long as I can remember, I have wanted to be able to say, "I've run a 5K."

You CAN fight your greatest fears


Fear is something that consumes all of us at one time or another. But can your fears change?

Has your teen tried hookah?


The United States may be winning the war on cigarettes. After decades of public service announcements about the dangers of smoking, fewer teens are lighting up. But other forms of tobacco, like hookah, are taking their place.

IUD may carry breast cancer risk


A new study finds the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) or progesterone-releasing IUD, may be associated with a higher than expected incidence of breast cancer.

What makes me so tasty?


The colors you wear and the food you eat don't matter. We bust five common mosquito bite myths to help you stop the itch.

Natural fixes for summer hazards



Do's and don'ts for summertime sex


The weather doesn't have to be the only thing heating up this month. Summer is an excellent time to recharge and rejuvenate -- and your love life should be no exception.

The healthiest fish to eat?


As our oceans become more polluted, Sally Kohn sits down with Fabien Cousteau to talk about the healthiest fish to eat.

Lunden: Why I shaved my head


Former GMA anchor Joan Lunden talks about shaving her head after being diagnosed with breast cancer.

Plastic surgery gone wrong


Dr. Terry Dubrow and Dr. Paul Nassif from E!'s new show "Botched" discuss the risks and complications of plastic surgery.

Ha! Laughter is the best medicine


Scott Weems, author of "Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why," speaks with CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

Sleep more, lose weight


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us how sleeping more can actually help you feel less hungry.

VIDEO: The rehydration unit in an Indian slum


An Indian charity has set up a rehydration unit in their health centre to ensure local people get access to oral rehydration therapy

VIDEO: Healthy start for newborns


A new study shows that newborn babies can reap the health benefits of a delay in cutting their umbilical cord - whilst they're safe in their mothers' arms.

VIDEO: The six-year hair pulling selfie


Documenting hair pulling condition on YouTube

VIDEO: Cholera outbreak in South Sudan


A cholera outbreak has spread to nine out of 10 states in South Sudan.

VIDEO: Diarrhoea treatment 'saves millions'


The BBC's Rahul Tandon has been to a clinic in the Indian city of Calcutta where children are being treated for diarrhoea.

VIDEO: Africa collaborates to tackle Ebola


Health ministers from West African countries have adopted a common strategy to fight the deadly Ebola outbreak.

VIDEO: Meet the robots helping surgeons


Professor Yang of the Hamlyn Centre in London explains how modern robotics is helping surgeons improve their art.

In pictures: One man's HIV campaign


One man's HIV campaign in Indonesia's Bandung prison

Illegal bottom injections on rise in US


The deadly danger of illegal backstreet buttock injections

VIDEO: Heroin antidote offers cities hope


The heroin 'antidote' that can save overdosing addicts' lives

A life-saving cure with an $84,000 price tag


High cost of hepatitis C cure sparks outrage

Anatomy of female genital mutilation


What is it and why is it still being carried out across the world?

First aid for the mind


First aid for the mind

The 90-year-old sex guru


The wisecracking 90-year-old whose agony column is a cult hit

Caring for Kenya's HIV orphans


Finding the right drugs to care for Kenya's HIV orphans

Seeing a doctor for the first time in seven years


The Americans seeing a doctor for the first time in years

The virus detective who discovered Ebola


The young medic who discovered the deadly Ebola bug

Joining up Ghana's healthcare to save lives


Using technology to help mothers and babies in Ghana

Paracetamol for back pain questioned


Taking paracetamol for lower back pain does not improve recovery time or provide any greater pain relief than using a placebo, scientists say.

Genetic clues to age of first period


The timing of when a girl reaches puberty is controlled by hundreds of genes, say scientists.

Indian boy has 232 teeth removed


Doctors in India extract 232 teeth from the mouth of a 17-year-old boy in a seven-hour operation.

S Leone chief Ebola doctor infected


The doctor leading the fight against Ebola in Sierra Leone is now being treated for the deadly virus, a statement from the presidency says.

Quarantine over China plague death


Part of a city in north-west China is sealed off and dozens of people placed in quarantine after a man died of bubonic plague, state media say.

Glaxo profits fall hits shares


GlaxoSmithKline shares fall 6% as the drugs company's profits are hit by a slide in sales and a bribery investigation in China.

Three person IVF plans 'progress'


A public review into the three person IVF technique has been broadly supportive, says the Department of Health.

Human body parts dumped in Tanzania


Eight people from a Tanzanian medical institute are arrested after 85 bags containing human body parts are found in the city of Dar es Salaam.

'Large gene find in schizophrenia'


In the largest ever genetic study of the disease, scientists have discovered some 80 genes which could leave people at higher risk of schizophrenia.

'Exciting' drug flushes out HIV


Scientists say they have made an "exciting" step towards curing HIV by forcing the virus out of its hiding places in the body.

NHS tests 'plaster' patient-monitor


The NHS is starting to test a sticking-plaster-sized patient-monitoring patch.

Call to end FGM 'in this generation'


David Cameron has said female genital mutilation (FGM) and childhood forced marriage should be stopped worldwide "within this generation".

US hospital in $190m 'abuse' payout


Johns Hopkins Hospital agrees to pay $190m to thousands of women who joined a legal case claiming a gynaecologist secretly recorded them.

Early HIV drugs 'may not stop virus'


HIV can rapidly form invulnerable strongholds in the body, dashing hopes that early treatment might cure the virus, according to new research.

Early risers 'less moral at night'


"Morning people", who are more alert early in the day, are more likely to cheat and behave unethically in the night hours, researchers claim.

Do friends have similar genomes?


A study from US researchers suggests that friends are more genetically similar than strangers - to the same degree as fourth cousins.

Should we pay a monthly membership fee to the NHS?


Should we pay to be members of the NHS?

'Most dangerous day of their life'


The first is the most dangerous of life

VIDEO: Clue to antibiotic resistance spread


Scientists trying to understand the rise of antibiotic resistance believe pilgrimages could provide clues to the mechanisms behind its spread.

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