Health News
2/1/2015

U.S. congressman from Mississippi has inoperable brain tumor: spokesman


(Reuters) - U.S. Representative Alan Nunnelee of Mississippi, who was diagnosed with brain cancer last year, has been told by doctors he has a new tumor and it is inoperable, a spokesman for the Republican congressman said on Friday. Nunnelee, who was elected to his third term in November, suffered a stroke while in surgery to remove a tumor in June. "After seven months of bravely fighting brain cancer and a stroke, Congressman Alan Nunnelee was informed last Friday that a new tumor has developed and no further medical treatment is possible," Morgan Baldwin, a longtime Nunnelee consultant, said in a statement.

Ex-Super Bowl champ Leonard Marshall to teach about concussions


A football helmet's health warning sticker is pictured between a U.S. flag and the number 55, in memory of former student and NFL player Junior Seau, as the Oceanside Pirates high school football team prepares for their Friday night game in OceansideTwo-time Super Bowl champion Leonard Marshall is teaming up with the lawyer who first sued the NFL over concussions to form an educational road show on how to avoid and treat head injuries in sports. The target audience for the Brain Unity Trust is players, coaches and organizations, said Marshall, who suffers from CTE-related illnesses, perhaps from concussions during his 12 seasons as a defensive lineman in the National Football League in the 1980s and '90s. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive degenerative disease of the brain often found in athletes who suffered repetitive brain trauma.



FDA approves Shire's Vyvanse for binge-eating disorder


By Toni Clarke WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved Shire Plc's stimulant Vyvanse to treat binge-eating disorder, the first product to be approved for the condition. Vyvanse, which is currently approved to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, generated sales of more than $1 billion in the first nine months of last year. Dr. Flemming Ornskov, the company's chief executive officer, said in an interview that Shire's goal is to generate overall sales of $10 billion by 2020.

Suspected Ebola patient in California tests negative for virus


Hours after a suspected Ebola patient in Sacramento was found to be free of the virus, a second person hospitalized in California's capital was reported by public health officials on Friday to be undergoing evaluation and testing for the disease. The second patient was admitted to Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Medical Center on Wednesday, a day before the earlier patient came to light, and like the previous case is considered to be at low risk of having contracted the deadly virus, the hospital said in a statement. There was no immediate word on whether the two cases were linked or whether the second patient had traveled recently in West Africa, the epicenter of the worst Ebola epidemic on record, as had the first. The previous patient was transferred to the University of California-Davis Medical Center from another hospital in Sacramento on Thursday after exhibiting unspecified Ebola-like symptoms, health officials said.

Three U.S. House Republicans to seek Obamacare replacement


Ryan arrives to hold a committee hearing on the topic of U.S. economic growth at the U.S. Capitol in WashingtonThree top U.S. Republican lawmakers, including Representative Paul Ryan, will lead an effort to craft new health reforms that could replace Obamacare, party officials said on Friday. House leadership said Ryan, the former Republican vice presidential nominee, would join Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton and Education and the Workforce Committee John Kline as part of a new healthcare working group. The Republican-controlled House, which has voted numerous times to overturn the healthcare law, is expected to do so again next week. Republicans have failed in the past to reach consensus on legislation to replace Obamacare and analysts say that stubborn differences within the party persist.



Heavy kids can have celiac disease, too


By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) – Overweight children are just as likely as thin children to have celiac disease, a new study confirms. It's a common misconception - even among many doctors - that celiac disease is limited to people who are underweight. “Being overweight certainly does not exclude the diagnosis, as this paper shows,” said Dr. Peter Green, director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, who was not involved in the new study. Between 0.5 percent and 1 percent of people living in the developed world are thought to have celiac disease, in which gluten in food triggers a damaging immune response in the small intestines.

Obama hails 'boundless' promise of precision medicine


US President Barack Obama speaks on investments in "precision medicine" on January 30, 2015 in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DCPresident Barack Obama on Friday unveiled plans to plow $215 million into "precision medicine" research, a field he said provided "boundless" promise for the treatment of diseases like cancer and diabetes. The bulk of the money, $200 million, would go to the National Institutes of Health and its affiliate the National Cancer Institute.



Modern Medicine, Mired at the Line of Scrimmage


Modern Medicine, Mired at the Line of ScrimmageModern medicine has some things in common with football -- or maybe I just have the Super Bowl on the brain. Both, it seems to me, tend to foster our occasionally-overinflated hopes, leaving us at times to contend with a relatively, well, deflated reality.Both are team sports, advancing courtesy of collective effort. And by and large, progress...



Greece starts drive to sell new debt deal to doubting Europe


French Finance Minister Sapin and Greek Finance Minister Varoufakis arrive at a joint news conference in ParisBy Angeliki Koutantou ATHENS (Reuters) - Greece's leftist government on Sunday began its drive to persuade a sceptical Europe to accept a new debt agreement while it starts to roll back on austerity measures imposed under its existing bailout agreement. After a turbulent first week in office, the new government has made clear it wants to end the existing arrangement with the European Union, the European Central Bank and International Monetary Fund "troika" when its aid deadline expires on Feb. 28. Instead, Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras wants to agree a bridging deal with the troika while a new agreement is negotiated to reduce Greece's unmanageable public debt burden of more than 175 percent of its economic output is worked out. Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis, who spoke to U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew on Friday, is due to kick off a diplomatic offensive in Paris on Sunday, where he meets French counterpart Michel Sapin and Economy Minister Emmanuel Macron.



Obama targets foreign profits with tax proposal, Republicans skeptical


Obama delivers remarks at the armed services farewell in honor of Hagel in VirginiaBy Jeff Mason and Kevin Drawbaugh WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama's fiscal 2016 budget will seek new taxes on trillions of dollars in profits accumulated overseas by U.S. companies, and a new approach to taxing foreign profits in the future, but Republicans were skeptical of the plan on Sunday. Reviving a long-running debate about corporate tax avoidance, Obama will target a loophole that lets companies pay no tax on earnings held abroad, the White House said. In his budget plan to be unveiled on Monday, Obama will call for a one-time, 14 percent tax on an estimated $2.1 trillion in profits piled up abroad over the years by multinationals such as General Electric , Microsoft , Pfizer Inc and Apple Inc . He will also seek to impose a 19 percent tax on U.S. companies' future foreign earnings, the White House said.



Culturally sensitive palliative care represents new approach


In this Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014 photo, a nurse prepares liver cancer patient Crispin Lopez Serrano for an endoscopy at a Clackamas, Ore. hospital. Lopez Serrano, a Mexican native who is fully bilingual, says his care improved after he received culturally relevant palliative care from a Portland nonprofit organization, helping him to retain his doctors, boost his health literacy, and receive emotional support. (AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka)WEST LINN, Ore. (AP) — When doctors diagnosed Pilar Alcantara with advanced breast cancer, she felt lost and intimidated.



China eyes food safety, modern farms in 2015 rural policy


A sales assistant helps a customer to select Dumex milk powders at a supermarket in HefeiChina has listed food safety and modernizing farms as among key priorities this year, its 2015 rural policy outline showed, as it tackles falling agricultural productivity that has raised concerns about its future food supply. The "number one document", issued every January and released by state news agency Xinhua on Sunday, showed China will also protect farmland and lend more to farmers to narrow a wealth gap between rural and urban areas. Modern farms will be set up, and regulation of the quality of food and other farm products will be enhanced, it said. On land reforms, aimed at allowing farmers to trade their land to alleviate poverty and create bigger and more efficient farms, the document said the focus is on expanding an experiment that registers land usage rights to cover entire provinces.



International campaigners urge UK to allow 'three-parent' IVF babies


The process, still only at the research stage in Britain and the United States, involves intervening in the fertilization process to remove faulty mitochondrial DNA, which can cause inherited conditions such as fatal heart problems, liver failure, brain disorders, blindness and muscular dystrophy. Britain last February set out draft legislation that, if passed, would make it the first country to allow the technique. In their letter, groups including the U.S.-based United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation, the Australian Mitochondrial Disease Foundation and groups from France, Germany, Britain and Spain, described mitochondrial disease as "unimaginably cruel". The issue of mitochondrial donation has been scrutinized by several expert panels in Britain, including the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and the Nuffield Council on Bioethics.

International campaigners urge UK to allow '3-parent' IVF babies


The process, still only at the research stage in Britain and the United States, involves intervening in the fertilisation process to remove faulty mitochondrial DNA, which can cause inherited conditions such as fatal heart problems, liver failure, brain disorders, blindness and muscular dystrophy. Britain last February set out draft legislation that, if passed, would make it the first country to allow the technique. In their letter, groups including the U.S.-based United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation, the Australian Mitochondrial Disease Foundation and groups from France, Germany, Britain and Spain, described mitochondrial disease as "unimaginably cruel". The issue of mitochondrial donation has been scrutinised by several expert panels in Britain, including the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and the Nuffield Council on Bioethics.

Antibiotics firm Motif Bio to tap UK market for cash


Motif Bio, which is working on a range of antibiotics, is planning to raise at least 4 million pounds ($6 million) - and potentially up to 16 million - through a stock market listing in London. Motif Bio said it was in talks with investors ahead its move to list on the AIM market as it seeks funding to advance its experimental drugs. Motif Bio, which is led by former Merck executive and one-time vet Graham Lumsden, is buying rights to iclaprim through the purchase of U.S. firm Nuprim in a deal that will be completed once the company lists on AIM. Motif Bio believes it can get the drug approved by addressing certain shortfalls in the original development program.

In pursuit of next-generation Ebola stockpile vaccines


A research assistant works on a vaccine for Ebola at The Jenner Institute in OxfordBy Kate Kelland and Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - As West Africa's devastating Ebola outbreak begins to dwindle, scientists are looking beyond the endgame at the kind of next-generation vaccines needed for a vital stockpile to hit another epidemic hard and fast. "We need a stockpile because there will be other outbreaks," said Seth Berkley, chief executive of the GAVI global immunisation alliance, which helps bulk-buy vaccines for poor countries. The experimental vaccines now moving into large clinical trials in West Africa target the current Ebola Zaire virus strain, but the next outbreak may be different. "We need to work with the pharmaceutical industry to create second-generation vaccines that would cover not just Ebola Zaire but also Ebola Sudan and perhaps Marburg, perhaps Lassa.



Scientist considered father of birth control pill dies


FILE - In this Oct. 20, 2009 file photo, Carl Djerassi talks to Austrian Chancellor Werner Faymann, not seen, at the federal chancellery in Vienna, Austria. Djerassi, the chemist widely considered the father of the birth control pill, has died of complications of cancer in his San Francisco home, Stanford University spokesman Dan Stober said. He was 91. Djerassi, a professor emeritus of chemistry at Stanford, was most famous for leading a research team in Mexico City that in 1951 developed norethindrone, a synthetic molecule that became a key component of the first birth control pill. "The pill" as it came to be known radically transformed sexual practices and women's lives. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak, File)SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Carl Djerassi, the chemist widely considered the father of the birth control pill, has died.



Soccer-Huddersfield player stable after airlift drama


(Adds player staying in hospital overnight) LONDON, Jan 31 (Reuters) - Tommy Smith, a footballer for second-tier English club Huddersfield Town, had to be taken to hospital by helicopter after suffering a head injury in their game against Leeds United on Saturday. "We are pleased to report Tommy has been sitting up and talking to members of Huddersfield Town's staff who have visited him on Saturday evening," the website reported. Straight after the game, officials were still so concerned about his condition that they organised an air ambulance helicopter to land on Huddersfield's John Smith's Stadium pitch to fly Smith to hospital in nearby Leeds.

Chile's Bachelet takes on conservatives with plan to ease abortion ban


Chile's President Michelle Bachelet speaks at a news conference after her welcoming ceremony in the presidential palace in Guatemala CityBy Anthony Esposito SANTIAGO (Reuters) - Chile's president, Michelle Bachelet, unveiled plans on Saturday to ease a complete ban on abortions in the socially conservative South American country. In a televised address, leftist Bachelet said she was sending Congress a draft bill that would permit abortion when a mother's life is at risk, a fetus will not survive the pregnancy, or in the case of rape. The outright ban on terminations was put in place during the final days of Augusto Pinochet's 1973-1990 dictatorship. A number of attempts since then to legalize abortion have been blocked by right-wing legislators.



Soccer-Player airlifted to hospital after injury in English game


Tommy Smith, a footballer for second-tier English club Huddersfield Town, had to be taken to hospital by helicopter after suffering a head injury in their game against Leeds. Smith, a 22-year-old defender, had to be taken off the pitch on a stretcher late in the Championship game after a collision with his own goalkeeper Joe Murphy. Straight after the game, an air ambulance helicopter landed on Huddersfield's John Smith's Stadium pitch to fly Smith to Leeds General Infirmary.

Pivotal time for trans people as rigid notion of gender challenged: TRFN


By Maria Caspani NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - For Kate Bornstein, the American author and pioneer gender activist, this is a pivotal time in history for transgender people as the rigid concept of two sexes is challenged by a growing number of individuals who don't conform to either. "That's very different from their parents or even their older siblings," she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in a phone interview. "In the early 1990s, there might be one 'trans' student in six or seven colleges and now the audience is filled with female to male...or really cool gender queer (people)," Bornstein, who does not identify as male or female, says in a new film about her life. In the United States and beyond, a growing movement views gender as a complex, mainly psychological phenomenon in which a person's external anatomy is no longer the defining factor.

New York Measles Case Could Have Exposed Thousands of Travelers


ABC News' Ron Claiborne reports the morning's top stories.

GMO mosquito plan sparks outcry in Florida


A British company's plan to unleash hordes of genetically modified mosquitoes in Florida to reduce the threat of dengue fever and other diseases has sparked an outcry from fearful residentsA British company's plan to unleash hordes of genetically modified mosquitoes in Florida to reduce the threat of dengue fever and other diseases has sparked an outcry from fearful residents. The company, Oxitec, said it wants to try the technique there in order to reduce the non-native Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in south Florida and beyond. "They are more than just a nuisance as they can spread serious diseases such as dengue fever and chikungunya," Oxitec said on its website. The process involves inserting a gene into lab-grown, male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.



Africa looks to extend new disaster insurance to Ebola-like epidemics


Health workers carry the body of a suspected Ebola victim for burial at a cemetery in FreetownBy Daniel Flynn DAKAR (Reuters) - African countries want to extend a new catastrophe insurance fund, which made its first payout of $25 million this month, to include protection against epidemics in the wake of the devastating Ebola outbreak. The African Risk Capacity (ARC) agency, a specialised body of the African Union, launched a scheme last year to insure against natural disasters. It is an effort to break Africa's reliance on foreign aid and address the impact of climate change by using innovative financial techniques. The ARC paid $25 million in its first year of operations to Senegal, Mauritania and Niger to mitigate the effects of a severe drought in the arid Sahel region south of the Sahara -- well above the $8 million in premiums paid by those countries.



Liberia delays school reopening by two weeks as Ebola cases fall


RNPS: YEAREND REVIEW 2014 - HEADLINE MAKERSLiberia said on Friday it would delay reopening schools for two weeks in order to better prepare safety measures against the Ebola virus, which has killed more than 3,650 people in the country but now appears to be receding. A ministry statement said it wanted to "raise awareness about safety protocols, logistics and training requirements", adding: "Actual teaching will begin on Monday, Feb. 16, 2015." Some Liberian opposition parties and members of parliament had called for the reopening date to be moved to March 2, concerned that the Ebola epidemic is not yet fully under control. Liberia and its neighbours Sierra Leone and Guinea have been hardest hit in the worst outbreak of the viral haemorrhagic fever on record. The number of Ebola infections and deaths has fallen sharply in Liberia and Sierra Leone in the past few weeks, with just 20 deaths recorded in Liberia in the 21 days to Jan. 25, according to the World Health Organisation, raising hopes that the disease is gradually being brought under control.



Second patient hospitalized in California undergoes Ebola testing


Hours after a suspected Ebola patient in Sacramento, California, was found to be free of the virus, a second person hospitalized in the city was reported by public health officials on Friday to be undergoing testing for the deadly disease. The second patient was admitted to Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Medical Center on Wednesday and, like the previous case, is considered to be at low risk of having contracted the virus, the hospital said in a statement.

Drive to repeal medical device tax no slam dunk in Congress


FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2015 file photo, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah leaves the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington. It flew through the Republican-run House in 2012, and a year later 79 of the Democratic-led Senate’s 100 members embraced it. With Republicans now controlling both chambers of Congress, the chances for repealing the 2.3 percent tax on medical devices are better than ever. Yet abolishing the tax won’t be easy, even though Republicans rank it a top priority and are backed by Democrats from states that rely on the industry for jobs. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — It flew through the Republican-run House in 2012, and a year later 79 of the Democratic-led Senate's 100 members embraced it. With Republicans now controlling both chambers of Congress, the chances for repealing the 2.3 percent tax on medical devices are better than ever.



5 Ways to Be Happier Today


5 Ways to Be Happier TodayBrrr, its cold outside! These cold, grey winter days can send even the most positive people into a downward funk. Now that winter is truly upon us, what can you do to keep your spirits up? Here are five ways to be happier TODAY:1. Start a gratitude list or journal. Concentrating on what you are thankful for in your life is a sure-fire way...



Do You Have Metabol-Envy?


Yesterday, I sat with a friend, and she said if she could have one wish it would be to be able to eat whatever she wanted and not gain weight. I clarified, "You mean instead of your family being healthy or world peace?" She said, "Well one wish or thing I could change about myself." I think I believe that last part. The truth is, I hear all...

Heat Up Your Intimacy by Cooking Together


Heat Up Your Intimacy by Cooking TogetherThere is no escaping it -- Valentine's Day is just around the corner, and those chalky candy hearts staring at you in the drug store are proof of it. In this world of mass-produced love, it can often be hard to find that feeling of authentic romance. This year, instead of packing yourself into an overstuffed restaurant filled with irritated...



Father of Psych Ward Stabbing Victim Says Mental Patients Treated Like 'Prisoners'


Father of Psych Ward Stabbing Victim Says Mental Patients Treated Like 'Prisoners'The father of man stabbed to death by his roommate in a southern California hospital psych ward won $3 million in punitive damages this week against the hospital where his son died. "Mentally challenged individuals have just as many rights as other people," Joseph Camacho, 79, told ABC News. His son, Dean Camacho, who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, was attacked at Pacifica Hospital of the Valley in Sun Valley, California, by his roommate, Jerry Romansky in 2011, according to court documents. Though rooms throughout the hospital were equipped with emergency buzzers, they had been disabled in the mental health wing, according to Joseph Camacho's lawyer, John Marcin.



Second California patient tests negative for Ebola hours after first


By Sharon Bernstein SACRAMENTO, Calif. (Reuters) - Two patients hospitalized in Sacramento, California, and tested for possible Ebola infection were found to be free of the deadly virus within hours of each other on Friday. The first patient, whose case came to light on Thursday, was transferred that day to the University of California-Davis Medical Center from a smaller hospital after having traveled recently in West Africa and exhibiting Ebola-like symptoms, officials said. Health authorities would not say whether they believed the two cases to be related or whether the second patient had traveled recently in West Africa, epicenter of the worst Ebola epidemic on record, as had the first. The back-to-back Ebola inquiries came five months after another person in Sacramento was hospitalized for testing and also found free of the disease.

More measles cases found in California


LOS ANGELES (AP) — More measles cases have been found in California, health officials said Friday.

More than 100 cases of measles now confirmed in U.S


By Dan Whitcomb LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - More than 100 people in the United States have been confirmed as infected with measles including 91 in California, most of them linked to an outbreak that began at Disneyland in December, public health officials said on Friday. The California Department of Public Health said at least 58 of the cases of the highly infectious disease in the state have been epidemiologically linked to the Disneyland cluster. No deaths have been reported in connection with the outbreak, which public health officials suspect began when an infected person from outside the United States visited Disneyland in Anaheim between Dec. 15 and Dec. 20. The White House on Friday urged parents to heed the advice of public health officials and scientists in getting their children vaccinated.

Spain uses stem cell therapy to treat damaged hearts


A Spanish hospital has successfully used stem cells, like those pictured here, culled from healthy donors to treat heart attack victimsA Spanish hospital has successfully used stem cells culled from healthy donors to treat seven heart attack victims, in what officials said was a world first. Madrid's Gregorio Maranon hospital plans to treat 55 patients in all with the technique in a clinical trial, the regional Madrid government which runs the hospital said in a statement. "Seven patients have already been operated on and they have progressed very well despite having suffered serious damage to their heart tissue," it added. It is the first time that allogeneic cells -- stem cells that come from another person -- have been used to repair damage to a heart caused by a heart attack, the statement added.



Ohio postpones all 2015 executions as it secures new drugs


By Kim Palmer CLEVELAND (Reuters) - Ohio will postpone all six executions scheduled for 2015 because it needs more time to prepare for a new execution procedure and to secure a new supply of execution drugs, the state's prison department said on Friday. Earlier this month, the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction halted use of the two-drug lethal injection combination of the sedative midazolam and painkiller hydromorphone after the protracted death of an inmate last year. The state prison system wants to add a drug, thiopental sodium, previously used for lethal injections from 1999 to 2011, and pentobarbital as the two drugs permitted for lethal injections in the future. Ohio and other states with the death penalty are seeking new execution drug formulations after some pharmaceutical companies stopped supplying products because they no longer wanted to be associated with capital punishment.

Chimerix to stop participation in clinical studies of Ebola drug


(Reuters) - Drug developer Chimerix Inc said it would stop participation in clinical studies of its Ebola drug, brincidofovir, citing a significant decrease in the number new cases for the virus in Liberia. The decision was announced after the company's discussions with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Brincidofovir was given to the first Ebola patient diagnosed in the United States, Thomas Eric Duncan, who later succumbed to the infection.

Sit smarter with yoga



Meet the mental wellness warriors



7 resolutions that yoga can help you keep



Natural family planning gets trendy


More women are saying no to hormonal birth control and yes to pregnancy prevention that sounds old-fashioned, natural family planning, also called FAM.

People who feel younger at heart live longer


Go ahead lie about your age. It may be the very thing that helps you live a longer life.

Learn to live with it: Becoming stress-free


People the world over believe that stress comes from external sources.

5 ways to fat-proof your home, no willpower necessary


Think you're immune to temptation? Let's be honest: Even the most disciplined healthy eater will occasionally give in to "runger" (running hunger). One minute you're walking past a box of granola sitting on the kitchen counter; five minutes and 500 calories later, you probably wish you'd hidden that box in a cabinet instead.

10 yoga poses to beat stress


Yoga can be a great way to calm your mind while giving your body the attention it deserves.

How the Peace Corps continues to fight Ebola



CDC: Flu still hitting U.S. hard but slowing



A survivor's notes from the Ebola zone



'Frozen': Why kids can't 'Let It Go'



Aspirin a day may not be necessary for everyone's heart health


If you're popping aspirin on a daily basis to lower your chances of having a heart attack or stroke, it might turn out that an aspirin a day may not keep the doctor away. It may even cause more health problems for you.

Man shows off his double arm transplant


A 40-year-old quad amputee was all thank yous at a news conference as he showed off his two new arm transplants.

Yoga for Super Bowl stars



Why sleep apnea shouldn't be ignored



Dad: Ban students who haven't been immunized



'Butchered:' Ireland's gruesome era of symphysiotomy


Rita McCann still remembers the day when her joy at the prospect of giving birth to her first child turned into sheer terror.

American Ebola survivor's journal: Back in Africa



Medicare patients could see better care



Could woman expose nearly 200 kids to measles?


Anderson Cooper speaks to Elizabeth Cohen about the spread of measles after one Arizona woman may have exposed hundreds of children to the disease.

Twins need liver transplants; dad can only help one


An Ontario father of adopted twins who both need liver transplants is a match to donate part of his organ, but can only help one. CBC News has more.

Sitting will kill you, even if you exercise



Key to losing weight, quitting smoking: love



How bad is booze, anyway?



5 ways to eat healthier this year



How to really lose weight


From what to eat to how much to exercise, Elizabeth Cohen explains what you really need to do to lose weight.

Meet the new Fit Nation team



They lost weight; so can you



She lost 145 pounds; could you?



Why painkiller addicts turn to heroin



Adam's story: 63 pills a day


The modest clinic on Milpas Street in laid-back Santa Barbara, California, was well known to patients seeking powerful pain medication.

Prescription drug abuse: There is help


Facing the reality that "I need help" and knowing where to actually get it are crucial initial steps for anyone battling prescription drug addiction. The process to recovery can be one ridden with pain, denial and shame.

American Ebola survivor returns to Liberia



Baby buried by 2010 Haiti quake: See her now


For 10 days following the 2010 Haiti earthquake, two CNN colleagues and I lived in a tent hospital run by Project Medishare. Our hearts ached as we heard the cries of the injured, as we watched surgeons performed amputations without general anesthesia, as people died in front of our eyes.

Ebola fighter coming to U.S. for nursing school


A young Liberian woman who saved three of her relatives by nursing them back to health after they contracted the Ebola virus is coming to the United States to finish her nursing degree.

Partners can 'make pain worse'


Some women may find medical procedures more painful if their partners are present, a small study suggests.

Huddles 'help children's hospital care'


Small measures that could boost children's care

The battle for control of the cigarette packet


How health warnings are changing cigarette packet design

VIDEO: Preventing drowning with playpens


Playpens are being used to save thousands of children from drowning in Bangladesh.

VIDEO: Measles outbreak blamed on parents


The US has been measles-free for 15 years but there has been a new outbreak, which started at Disneyland in California.

VIDEO: Veteran news anchor reveals he has ALS


Veteran US news presenter Larry Stogner has revealed he has an incurable neurological disease live on air.

VIDEO: 'New generation' drug research plan


Pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca has announced a research programme to develop a new generation of medicines to treat the genetic causes of many debilitating diseases.

VIDEO: Stigma of caring for Ebola patients


People who help those with Ebola in West Africa have to overcome not just the danger of that role, but also stigma and social isolation.

VIDEO: Body clocks and blindness


Our eyes are key to resetting our body clocks. So what happens to people who can't see anything at all?

VIDEO: TV ad warns of heartburn-cancer sign


Persistent heartburn could be a sign of cancer, doctors warn, as a new campaign is launched to make people more aware of the signs.

VIDEO: War hero's pioneering brain treatment


BBC Inside Out follows injured soldier and Afghanistan war hero Ben Parkinson as he embarks on pioneering oxygen treatment for his brain injury.

Sink or Swim? The global drowning crisis


Playpens to drones - new ideas to reduce deaths by drowning

India's illegal market for blood


The desperate patients in India turning to illegal blood donors

Mickey Mouse and measles


Disney outbreak has critics blasting 'anti-vax' parents

VIDEO: Care home residents enjoy cocktail party


Cocktail parties in care homes help people relive younger years

Deadly dip: baseball's toxic tradition


The fight against baseball's toxic tradition

'The year I lost my limbs was the most brilliant of my life'


'I lost all my limbs but it has been the most brilliant year ever'

Chinese man's rare stem cell match


Shanghai driver donates stem cells to seven-year-old UK boy

Call the Midwife in Bangladesh


New TV series tries to break taboo of childbirth in Bangladesh

Meet the children orphaned by Ebola


Meet some of the 10,00 children who have lost parents to Ebola

Ebola care centre for pregnant women


First treatment centre specialising in care for pregnant women opens

In search of a personalised diet


How personalised diets can help slimming

The transgender 13-year-old


Is 13 too young for transgender therapy?

Child obesity rates 'levelling off'


The rise in childhood obesity, which has left one in three children overweight, may be beginning to level off in the under-10s, a study suggests.

Bedtime 'has huge impact on sport'


Our internal body clock has such a dramatic impact on sporting ability that it could alter the chances of Olympic gold.

Ebola virus mutating, scientists say


Scientists at the Institut Pasteur in France who are tracking the Ebola outbreak in Guinea say the virus has mutated.

Bank chief warns of pandemic threat


The world is "dangerously unprepared" for future pandemics like the deadly Ebola outbreak, the president of the World Bank warns.

E. coli found in Winnipeg water


Residents in the Canadian city of Winnipeg have been instructed to boil their drinking water after testing found E. coli and other bacteria in the water supply.

Dementia 'link' to common drugs


A study links commonly used medicines, including over-the-counter treatments for conditions such as insomnia and hay-fever, to dementia.

Double-chin jab approval sought


US drug regulators are considering approving an injection designed to combat chin fat.

High cholesterol in mid-life risky


Having even slightly raised cholesterol in midlife significantly increases a person's risk of heart disease, research reveals.

Egypt doctor 'convicted in FGM case'


An Egyptian doctor is convicted of the manslaughter of a girl who died after undergoing an illegal female genital mutilation procedure, activists say.

Ebola vaccine 'shipped to Liberia'


The first batch of a vaccine against Ebola is on its way to Liberia and trials are expected to start soon.

Cosmetic surgery 'popularity falls'


The popularity of cosmetic surgery in the UK has plummeted in 2014, figures from the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons show.

Exercise advice is 'unrealistic'


Researchers say current exercise guidelines are unrealistic and argue doctors should promote small increases in activity instead.

Oxfam seeks post-Ebola Marshall Plan


Oxfam calls for a multi-million dollar Marshall Plan-type scheme to help West African countries worst affected by Ebola recover from the crisis.

Post-traumatic stress 'in 1300BC'


Evidence of post-traumatic stress disorder can be traced back to 1300BC - much earlier than previously thought - say researchers.

Global soil hunt for new drugs


US scientists are asking the public to send in soil samples that can be screened for compounds that could be used to make vital new drugs to fight deadly infections and cancer.

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