Health News
10/21/2014

South Sudan sexual violence 'rampant,' two-year-old raped: U.N.


By Louis Charbonneau UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - Rape and other forms of sexual violence by all sides in South Sudan's civil war have become so widespread that a 2-year-old child was among the victims, the U.N. special representative on sexual violence in armed conflict said on Monday. "In my 30 years of experience, I've never witnessed anything like what I saw in Bentiu," Zainab Hawa Bangura told reporters about a recent trip to the northern town, one of South Sudan's regions worst hit by the conflict. "The IDPs (internally displaced persons) seeking refuge there face a combination of ... ...

Connecticut nursing schools suspend programs with hospital over Ebola scare


By Richard Weizel NEW HAVEN Conn. (Reuters) - At least two Connecticut university nursing programs have stopped sending student nurses to work in the emergency room of a New Haven hospital where a patient was admitted last week with Ebola-like symptoms but tested negative for the virus. Fairfield University and Sacred Heart University said on Monday they were suspending their programs at Yale-New Haven Hospital, while Fairfield went a step further and stopped sending students to work clinical shifts at the medical center. ...

CDC calls for better training with protective gear in new Ebola guidelines


(Reuters) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Monday it has set up new guidelines for health workers taking care of patients infected with Ebola that require better training in taking off and putting on protective suits. The CDC also said that no skin can be exposed by workers taking care of a person infected with Ebola and that supervisors need to monitor workers as they put on protective suits and take them off. (Reporting by Jon Herskovitz)

Screen travellers on exit, not entry: Ebola study


A woman and her baby arriving from Conakry in Guinea have their blood pressure taken as part of health checks to screen passengers for the deadly Ebola virus at the airport in Abidjan on October 20, 2014Paris (AFP) - Screening air travellers on departure from Ebola-hit countries is far smarter than monitoring them when they arrive abroad, experts said on Tuesday.



'Buffy' star Nicolas Brendon apologizes for drunken arrest


LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" star Nicholas Brendon on Monday apologized for his arrest stemming from a drunken dispute at an Idaho hotel and said he is seeking treatment for "emotional demons." Brendon, 48, said in a statement posted on his Facebook page that he had mixed alcohol and prescription medication taken to manage pain for a cyst behind his knee cap. "I regret disappointing my family, my fans and myself," Brendon said. "I intend to seek appropriate treatment and therapy for my medical ailments as well as my emotional demons. ...

Cell transplant helps paralyzed man walk with frame


By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - A Bulgarian man who was paralyzed from the chest down in a knife attack can now walk with the aid of a frame after receiving pioneering transplant treatment using cells from his nose. The technique, described as a breakthrough by a study in the journal Cell Transplantation, involved transplanting what are known as olfactory ensheathing cells into the patient's spinal cord and constructing a "nerve bridge" between two stumps of the damaged spinal column. "We believe... ...

Study shows exit screening vital to halting global Ebola spread


Travellers walk past the red stop line as passengers arrive from Conakry at Charles de Gaulle International Airport in Roissy, near ParisBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Three Ebola-infected travelers a month would be expected to get on international flights from the West African countries suffering epidemics of the deadly virus if there were no effective exit screening, scientists said on Tuesday. The three countries, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, do all check departing air passengers for fever, although the test cannot spot sufferers in the period before they show symptoms, which can be up to 21 days. ...



In Chicago, a warm homecoming for unpopular Obama


President Barack Obama delivers remarks during a campaign rally for Gov. Pat Quinn, D-Ill., at Chicago State University on Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)CHICAGO (AP) — They say you can never truly go home again, but for Barack Obama, perhaps the old adage doesn't apply.



Pollution in pregnancy linked to lung damage in child


Pregnant women are pictured in Bangkok on October 29, 2013Paris (AFP) - Women exposed to high levels of traffic pollution during the second trimester of pregnancy are at higher risk of giving birth to a child with weak lungs, researchers said Monday.



U.S. officials who promised new Ebola guidelines set news conference


WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control set a news teleconference for 7 p.m. ET (2300 GMT)on Monday, having promised earlier in the day to issue new Ebola guidelines. (Reporting by Yasmeen Abutaleb; Editing by Howard Goller)

Using military and new protocols, U.S. ramps up Ebola response


DALLAS (Reuters) - Weeks of worries about a possible Ebola infection ended for dozens of people on watch lists in the United States on Monday but scores were still being monitored after potential exposure to the virus, Texas health officials said. Forty-three people who had contact with Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed with the disease in the United States, were cleared overnight of twice-daily monitoring after 21 days of showing no symptoms, the state health department said, while another 120 were still on watch lists. ...

AbbVie says $55 billion acquisition of Shire officially dead


A screen displays the share price for pharmaceutical maker AbbVie on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange(Reuters) - U.S. drugmaker AbbVie Inc said on Monday it has reached agreement with Shire Plc to officially call off its proposed $55 billion purchase of the Irish company, and will pay Shire a $1.64 billion breakup fee for walking away from the deal. AbbVie, which last week said its board of directors had withdrawn its recommendation to proceed with the Shire purchase, blamed the unraveling on last month's rules changes by the U.S. Treasury Department aimed at curtailing a wave of such deals in which U.S. ...



Actavis, Sanofi among bidders for Omega Pharma: Bloomberg


(Reuters) - Generic drugmaker Actavis Plc and France's Sanofi SA are among the suitors for privately held Omega Pharma NV , Bloomberg reported, citing people familiar with the matter. Other bidders for the Belgian consumer healthcare company include Perrigo Co and private German drugmaker Boehringer Ingelheim GmBH, the sources told Bloomberg. Final bid offers are due beginning November, Bloomberg reported, citing the people, who added that the deal could fetch Omega more than 4 billion euros ($5.1 billion). Actavis was not immediately available for comment. ...

Prince William and wife Kate expecting baby in April


Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, carries her son Prince George alongside her husband Prince William as they visit the Sensational Butterflies exhibition at the Natural History Museum in LondonLONDON (Reuters) - The second child of Britain's Prince William and his wife Kate is due to be born in April, his office announced on Monday. William, grandson of Queen Elizabeth and second-in-line to the throne, announced last month that Kate was expecting a second baby to join Prince George who was born in July last year, but no date for the birth was disclosed at the time. ...



Ebola patient released from Atlanta hospital


ATLANTA (AP) — An Ebola patient who's been treated in Atlanta since early September has been released, hospital officials said Monday.

Watch: Dallas Hospital Apologizes Over Handling of Ebola Case


ABC News's Dr. Richard Besser talks to Texas Presbyterian Health's Dr. Daniel Varga on the Ebola misdiagnosis.

Microsoft says to provide cloud, tools for tackling Ebola


Microsoft CEO Nadella addresses the media during an event in New DelhiSAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Microsoft Corp will provide free cloud-computing and research applications to qualified medical researchers working on the Ebola virus, the software company's chief executive said on Monday. "One of the things tomorrow morning we're going to do is make available Azure computer power to the research community," Chief Executive Officer Satya Nadella said at a presentation in San Francisco. ...



Parkinson’s drugs linked to impulse control disorders


By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Dopamine receptor agonist drugs were linked with higher risks for pathological gambling, hypersexuality and compulsive shopping in a new study. Cases of these severe impulse control disorders linked to the drugs have been reported for more than 10 years, and in many cases the abnormal behavior stops when patients stop taking the medications, lead author Thomas J. Moore of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices in Alexandria, Virginia, and colleagues write in their report of the study. ...

Parent and peer disapproval can lead to teen suicide


By Ronnie Cohen NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Teens who’ve attempted suicide, or tried to harm themselves, are more likely to try again to kill or hurt themselves if they think their parents or peers “invalidate” their feelings, a new study suggests. People can feel invalidated when they feel someone’s not listening to them, or when someone negates their feelings, for example. ...

Ebola: Keeping patients alive as body fights back


FILE - This 2011 photo provided by Wilmot Chayee shows Thomas Eric Duncan at a wedding in Ghana. People who shared an apartment with the country's first Ebola patient are emerging from quarantine healthy. And while Thomas Eric Duncan died and two U.S. nurses were infected caring for him, there are successes, too: A nurse infected in Spain has recovered, as have four American aid workers infected in West Africa. Even there, not everyone dies. (AP Photo/Wilmot Chayee)WASHINGTON (AP) — People who shared an apartment with the country's first Ebola patient are emerging from quarantine healthy. And while Thomas Eric Duncan died and two U.S. nurses were infected caring for him, there are successes, too: A nurse infected in Spain has recovered, as have four American aid workers infected in West Africa. Even there, not everyone dies.



Why Creating a Not To-Do List Leads to Innovation


Why Creating a Not To-Do List Leads to InnovationOne day, Warren was having a conversation with his pilot about his life goals. Warren then asked him to create a list of the top 25 things he wanted to achieve in the next few years. After jotting down his list, Warren asked the pilot to review and circle the top five that were most important to him.



Spanish judge orders release of ill boy's parents


This is an undated handout photos issued by England's Hampshire Police on Monday Sept. 1, 2014, of Brett King and Naghemeh King, the parents of Ashya King, who have legal proceedings against them continuing in Spain after they took the five-year-old brain cancer patient out of hospital without doctors' consent. Critically-ill 5-year-old boy Ashya King driven to Spain by his parents is receiving medical treatment for a brain tumor in a Spanish hospital as his parents await extradition to Britain, police said Sunday Aug. 31 2014. Officers received a phone call late Saturday from a hotel east of Malaga advising that a vehicle fitting the description circulated by police was on its premises. Both parents were arrested and the boy, Ashya King, was taken to a hospital, a Spanish police spokesman said. (AP Photo/Hampshire Police)SOTO DEL REAL, Spain (AP) — Spanish officials have ordered the immediate release of a detained British couple who were wanted by police in the United Kingdom after they took their critically ill child for treatment abroad without doctors' consent.



Rational altruism against Ebola


It may seem surprising that there has been a deluge of international press coverage of the recent outbreak of Ebolavirus: In fact, this disease where it does occur, unlike many others, starting with cholera, causes many fewer deaths. Its media impact, though, is justified on the basis of its appalling aspect, by the absence of vaccines or drugs...

WHO's emergency committee on Ebola to meet Wednesday


A man walks near a screen displaying a message on Ebola outside the local headquarters of WHO in AbidjanGENEVA (Reuters) - The World Health Organization's emergency committee on Ebola will meet on Wednesday to review the scope of the outbreak and whether additional measures are needed, a WHO spokeswoman said on Tuesday. "This is the third time this committee will meet since August to evaluate the situation. Much has happened, there have been cases in Spain and the United States, while Senegal and Nigeria have been removed from the list of countries affected by Ebola," WHO spokeswoman Fadela Chaib told a news briefing. ...



GAO takes on Medicare Advantage spending


GAO will investigate program spending

CDC releases revised Ebola gear guidelines


FILE - In this Oct. 16, 2014, file photo, Registered nurse Keene Roadman, stands fully dressed in personal protective equipment during a training class at the Rush University Medical Center, in Chicago. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new guidelines Monday, Oct. 20, for how health workers should gear up to treat Ebola patients. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)ATLANTA (AP) — Federal officials are going on the road with new guidelines to promote head-to-toe protection for health workers treating Ebola patients.



Ebola: Providing time to fight the virus


FILE - In this Oct. 12, 2014, file photo, Dr. Tom Frieden, head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, speaks at a news conference in Atlanta. People who shared an apartment with the country's first Ebola patient are emerging from quarantine healthy. And while Thomas Eric Duncan died and two U.S. nurses were infected caring for him, there are successes, too: A nurse infected in Spain has recovered, as have four American aid workers infected in West Africa. Even there, not everyone dies. (AP Photo/John Amis, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — People who shared an apartment with the country's first Ebola patient are emerging from quarantine healthy. And while Thomas Eric Duncan died and two U.S. nurses were infected caring for him, there are successes, too: A nurse infected in Spain has recovered, as have four American aid workers infected in West Africa. Even there, not everyone dies.



Ebola fear factor subsides in U.S. financial markets


Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)By Yasmeen Abutaleb NEW YORK (Reuters) - Investors should expect more calm to return to U.S. equity markets after some of the most volatile trading since 2012 as the 21-day incubation period for Ebola passes for many in Texas without new infections. The market's big losses last week were largely attributed to concerns over global growth and plummeting oil prices. But fears that Ebola could spread in the United States after three people in Dallas were diagnosed with the hemorrhagic fever added more than a little froth to the market's recent convulsions. ...



World must stop Ebola in West Africa or face 'pandemic' - Cuba's Castro


Cuba's President Castro attends the opening ceremony of the ALBA-TCP Extraordinary Ebola summit in HavanaBy Daniel Trotta HAVANA (Reuters) - The world must confront Ebola in West Africa to prevent what could become one of the worst pandemics in human history, Cuban President Raul Castro said on Monday. "I am convinced that if this threat is not stopped in West Africa with an immediate international response ... it could become one of the gravest pandemics in human history," Castro told a summit of the leftist ALBA bloc of Latin American and Caribbean countries in Havana. ...



South Sudan sexual violence "rampant," 2-year-old raped -UN


A woman displaced by the fighting in Bor county sits by her mosquito net in the early morning in MinkamanBy Louis Charbonneau UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - Rape and other forms of sexual violence by all sides in South Sudan's civil war have become so widespread that a 2-year-old child was among the victims, the U.N. special representative on sexual violence in armed conflict said on Monday. "In my 30 years of experience, I've never witnessed anything like what I saw in Bentiu," Zainab Hawa Bangura told reporters about a recent trip to the northern town, one of South Sudan's regions worst hit by the conflict. "The IDPs (internally displaced persons) seeking refuge there face a combination of ... ...



California mayor resigns after drunk driving arrest


(Reuters) - A southern California mayor who was arrested last week on suspicion of drunken driving in an accident that injured four teenagers announced his resignation on Monday. Murrieta Mayor Alan Long, who gained national attention in the summer when he led a local backlash against a plan to process illegal Central American immigrants in the town, said he stepped down both as Mayor and as a city council member. "I do not believe under the circumstances it is appropriate for me to remain in these positions," Long said in a statement sent by his attorney Virginia Blumenthal. ...

U.S. Republicans look to gain election ground on Ebola


By Nick Carey CHICAGO (Reuters) - Ebola has moved to the front of campaign issues before U.S. November elections, as fear and criticism of the government's response to cases of the virus in the United States opened a new line of Republican attacks against President Barack Obama and his fellow Democrats. Republican Senate candidates have bashed Obama's handling of Ebola, linking it to border security and calling for a travel ban from West African countries hardest hit by the virus. ...

Antibiotics may help animals spread salmonella


Giving animals antibiotics may make them sicker and could lead some to spread even more salmonella than they would have otherwise, US researchers experimenting on mice saidWashington (AFP) - Giving animals antibiotics may make them sicker and could lead some to spread even more salmonella than they would have otherwise, US researchers experimenting on mice said.



Ebola crisis turns a corner as U.S. issues new treatment protocols


Health care worker receives protocol on the proper removal of personal protection equipment from CDC instructors in preparation for the response to the current Ebola outbreak, during a CDC safety training course in Anniston, AlabamaBy Anna Driver and Lisa Marie Garza DALLAS (Reuters) - The United States issued stringent new protocols on Monday for health workers treating Ebola victims, directing medical teams to wear protective gear that leaves no skin or hair exposed to prevent medical workers from becoming infected. The new guidelines from the U.S. ...



New Ebola gear guidelines: head-to-toe coverage


FILE - In this Oct. 16, 2014, file photo, registered nurse Keene Roadman, stands fully dressed in personal protective equipment, as he and registered nurse Fred Serafin, right, demonstrate proper protective procedures to doctors and nurses during a training class at the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new guidelines Monday, Oct. 20, for how health workers should gear up to treat Ebola patients. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)Health care workers should be completely covered — no skin exposed — while caring for Ebola patients, according to revised guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The government agency tightened its guidance after two Dallas nurses became infected with the virus while caring for an Ebola patient.



GOP governors don't see 'Obamacare' going away


FILE - This Sept. 29, 2014, file photo shows Ohio Gov. John Kasich as he speaks at a GOP Get Out the Vote rally in Independence, Ohio. Republicans may be close to winning control of Congress and more votes to repeal “Obamacare,” but GOP governors don’t see the president’s health care law going away. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — While Republicans in Congress shout, "Repeal Obamacare," GOP governors in many states have quietly accepted the law's major Medicaid expansion. Even if their party wins control of the Senate in the upcoming elections, they just don't see the law going away.



U.S. risks trade sanctions in WTO meat label dispute


Rich Jochum displays a package of lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux CityBy Tom Miles and Krista Hughes GENEVA/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States faces potential trade sanctions from Canada and Mexico after the World Trade Organization ruled on Monday it had failed to bring its meat labeling regulations fully in line with international fair trading rules. The WTO said the United States had not done enough to change its labeling rules, requiring retailers such as grocery stores to list the country of origin on meat, after it lost an earlier WTO challenge. ...



Worst Ebola outbreak on record tests global response


(Reuters) - Global health authorities are struggling to contain the world's worst Ebola epidemic since the disease was identified in 1976. The virus has killed more than 4,500 people. Here is a timeline of the outbreak: March 22: Guinea confirms a previously unidentified hemorrhagic fever, which killed more than 50 people, is Ebola. March 30: Liberia reports two Ebola cases; suspected cases reported in Sierra Leone. April 1: Medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) warns the epidemic's spread is "unprecedented." A World Health Organization (WHO) spokesman calls it "relatively small ...

Colorado proposes edible pot ban, then retreats


In this Sept. 26, 2014 photo, smaller-dose pot-infused brownies are packaged at The Growing Kitchen, in Boulder. Recreational marijuana sellers are reaching out to novice cannabis users with edible products that impart a milder buzz and make it easy for inexperienced customers to find a dose they are less likely to regret taking. The marketing shift is the pot-industry equivalent of selling beer and wine alongside higher-alcohol options such as whiskey and vodka. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)DENVER (AP) — Colorado health authorities suggested banning many forms of edible marijuana, including brownies and cookies, then whipsawed away from the suggestion Monday after it went public.



NBC's Snyderman faces credibility issues


In this Sept. 1, 2011 photo released by NBC, NBC News' chief medical editor Dr. Nancy Snyderman appears on the "Today" show in New York. Snyderman who has been at NBC since 2006, covered the Ebola outbreak in West Africa and worked briefly with Ashoka Mukpo, the cameraman who caught the virus and is now being treated in Nebraska. Snyderman and her crew voluntarily agreed to quarantine themselves for 21 days, the longest known incubation period for the disease. They have shown no symptoms. New Jersey health officials ruled that her quarantine should be mandatory after Snyderman and her crew were spotted getting takeout food from a New Jersey restaurant. (AP Photo/NBC, Peter Kramer)NEW YORK (AP) — The quarantine against possible Ebola exposure ends this week for Dr. Nancy Snyderman, but the troubles clearly aren't over for NBC News' chief medical editor.



50 pounds lost for 50th reunion


In January, Carol Highsmith, 68, began a journey of threes. She had three milestones of 50 that she planned to reach by following three simple rules:

College student with meningitis dies


An 18-year-old San Diego State University student diagnosed with meningitis died Friday, leaving university officials scrambling to notify up to 400 people with whom she may have come in contact.

Are pets exposed to Ebola a threat?


Do dogs exposed to Ebola pose a health risk to humans? Biologist and TV host Dan Riskin explains.

A one-woman Ebola hospital


22-year-old Fatu Kekula nursed her mother, father and sister through Ebola using trash bags to protect herself.

Crab's blood could save your life


Hundreds of thousands of horseshoe crabs are captured each year for their incredible blue blood.

The monster that took my son


A week before Cole died, I promised him he would do "something big" someday. For two years, I have been fighting to keep that promise.

San Diego State student with meningitis dies


An 18-year-old San Diego State University student diagnosed with meningitis died Friday, leaving university officials scrambling to notify up to 400 people with whom she may have come in contact.

Slow and steady may not win the weight loss race


Slow and steady may not be more effective than rapid weight loss -- and other things we learned from medical journals this week.

Bono: 'I have glaucoma'


There's a reason for Bono's ever-present orange-tinted sunglasses, and it's not rock-star affectation. The U2 frontman has glaucoma.

GOP slams Obama's choice for Ebola czar


Republicans who pressed President Barack Obama for a more coordinated federal response to the Ebola outbreak are blasting the appointment of Ron Klain, a veteran Democratic political aide, as the "Ebola czar."

I'd have to do how much exercise to eat that?


By early next year, more than 20 chain restaurants will be posting calorie counts on their menus. Yet that information may not be enough to change consumers' behavior, researchers say.

Man treated for Google Glass addiction


A man who checked in to the Navy's Substance Abuse and Recovery Program for alcoholism is also being treated for a Google Glass addiction, according to a new study.

Facebook pays to freeze employees' eggs


As part of the insurance coverage offered to its female employees, Facebook is paying to freeze their eggs.

Turnip + Michelle Obama cutting loose = viral Vine


Michelle Obama, never one to turn down an opportunity to champion healthy eating, has co-opted a popular tune -- and, in six seconds, created a viral sensation.

15 best superfoods for fall


Fall superfoods are the perfect excuse to get cooking on cool nights. See fall superfood pictures to get started!

The 7 best strength exercises


Every exercise in your strength program has a purpose -- to help you build strength and muscle, burn fat, and improve your fitness. While there's a time and a place for nearly any exercise under the right circumstance, some movements are simply more effective than others. And it should be no surprise that the ones that build a foundation for skills that you'll use in real life will be the most beneficial for improving your fitness and quality of life.

10 steps to happiness


It's World Smile Day, so here are 10 tweets to make you happy.

Reduce your risk of dementia


The statistics, unfortunately, are staggering. An estimated 44 million people worldwide are living with dementia, according to a report released Tuesday by Alzheimer's Disease International.

Hallucinogens to treat depression?


Psychedelic drugs are being researched as a potential treatment for conditions ranging from anxiety to tobacco and alcohol addiction.

Lack of sleep may shrink your brain


Can sleep deprivation affect the size of your brain? It's possible, a recent study published in an online issue of Neurology suggests.

Mental illness: Time to break taboo


350 million people around the world suffer from depression. Why aren't we talking about it?

Schizophrenia is eight disorders


What we know -- and psychiatrists have diagnosed for decades -- as schizophrenia may really be eight separate diseases, research published in The American Journal of Psychiatry suggests.

Adam's story: 63 pills a day


The modest clinic on Milpas Street in laid-back Santa Barbara, California, was well known to patients seeking powerful pain medication.

New link between coffee and DNA


You can blame that third cup of Joe on your genes.

Beer may be good for your brain


An element in beer may be good for your brain and other things we learned from medical journals this week.

Migraines linked to Parkinson's


People who suffer from migraines with aura during middle age have double the risk of developing Parkinson's disease or other movement disorders later in life than those who do not, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Neurology.

Music helps your brain


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us why music therapy is good for the brain and how it can help us live to 100.

Live to 100: Laugh more


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us how laughing more can help us live to 100.

Eat chocolate. Yes, chocolate.


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tell us how eating certain types of chocolate can help us live to 100.

Visit to Sanjay Gupta's past


Dr. Sanjay Gupta traveled from Pakistan to Michigan to discover his family's roots. Here's what he learned along the way.

How to really lose weight


From what to eat to how much to exercise, Elizabeth Cohen explains what you really need to do to lose weight.

Keeping young athletes safe


CNN's Holly Firfer reports on ways parents can keep their student athletes safe.

Lab holds 2,000 brains


The University of Miami Brain Endowment Bank provides brain tissues to researchers to study various brain disorders.

Smart toothbrush tracks brushing


This Bluetooth enabled toothbrush coaches you while you brush and tracks your progress through a smartphone app.

Farming in the city


This urban farm supplies fresh produce to food deserts, but also offers other benefits to individuals and the community.

Can psychedelic drugs be medicine?


Psychiatrists are now considering the benefits of LSD and other psychedelic drugs in treatment. Dr. Sanjay Gupta reports.

What is 'too much' caffeine?


Carl Azuz reports on why consuming too much caffeine is not good for you.

Inside your mind with 'Brain Games'


Jason Silva from National Geographic's hit show "Brain Games" talks about tricks the mind plays that shape our reality.

The best way to brush


CNN's Martha Shade reports on what's the best way to brush your teeth.

How outbreak can start, and end


Dr. Sanjay Gupta describes how "contact tracing" could help stem the tide of an Ebola outbreak.

The healthiest fish to eat?


As our oceans become more polluted, Sally Kohn sits down with Fabien Cousteau to talk about the healthiest fish to eat.

Plastic surgery gone wrong


Dr. Terry Dubrow and Dr. Paul Nassif from E!'s new show "Botched" discuss the risks and complications of plastic surgery.

Ha! Laughter is the best medicine


Scott Weems, author of "Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why," speaks with CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

Twin boys born 24 days apart


Due to a delayed delivery, a set of twins in Massachusetts were born 24 days apart. WCVB's Mary Saladna reports.

Is red meat really bad for you?


CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks with Nina Teicholz, author of "The Big Fat Surprise."

This is your body on weed


Dr. Sanjay Gupta explains how marijuana affects the brain and how pot can be used to treat certain conditions.

Teacher eats only McDonald's


A teacher only eats McDonald's for 90 days, and LOSES 37 pounds. KCCI reports.

World's most dangerous workout?


Is the "sport of fitness" the world's most dangerous workout? CNN's Jarrett Bellini asks CrossFitters and gives it a go.

Ebola: An epic, epidemic overreaction


If we really need something to worry about, worry about getting a flu shot -- not Ebola. And yet, the disproportionate hysteria over Ebola multiplies contagiously.

50 pounds lost for 50th reunion


In January, Carol Highsmith, 68, began a journey of threes. She had three milestones of 50 that she planned to reach by following three simple rules:

What the dying really regret


There are many regrets patients share with this chaplain before they die; those about time wasted hating their bodies are saddest.

5 healthy Halloween treats


We love Halloween season. Sweets. Sweaters. Sipping hot cider (maybe spiked). Halloween can certainly get you in the spirit, and nothing warms our hearts like these healthy Halloween treats that help you stay energized instead of stuck in a sugar coma.

How rabbi lost 100 pounds


Rabbi Pesach Sommer lost 100 pounds after a doctor told him he had type 2 diabetes.

Theater buff loses 121 pounds


Actor loses 121 pounds to feel better, and ends up nabbing the lead role in his own life.

It's time to get your flu shot!


Flu season is about to begin, the CDC says. And health officials have a few updates to their recommendations.

Flu shot myths addressed


Flu vaccine myths can confuse people trying to decide whether to get a shot. Here are five common myths and, based on information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the truth.

Vintage cold and flu ads



VIDEO: Ebola vaccine 'will come too late'


UK pharmaceuticals firm GlaxoSmithKline says its Ebola vaccine will not be ready until late 2015 and is "going to come too late" for this epidemic.

VIDEO: 'I lost five members of my family'


The UK charity Street Child has spoken to people in Kenema in Sierra Leone whose lives have been devastated by Ebola.

To walk again - the people behind the story


The project that enabled a paralysed man to walk again

Ebola: WHO under fire over response to epidemic


Global health body under fire over Ebola

Ebola crisis: How Nigeria's Dr Adadevoh fought the virus


How one doctor saved Nigeria from a catastrophe

Nigeria fights back against Ebola


Nigeria's lesson in how to prevent an outbreak

Ebola: How many people have died?


Why we don't know how many people Ebola has killed

Ebola treatments - how far off?


How soon could there be an off-the-shelf treatment and vaccine?

Why in a single year did life expectancy in the US drop by 12 years?


Why did life expectancy in the US drop by 12 years after WW1

Radio to the rescue: many saved


How broadcasting health messages can save lives

'Sadness and desperation - resilience and bravery'


BBC reporter learns of sad news that a suspected Ebola patient has died

How not to catch Ebola


As the outbreak rages, here's what we know about stopping it

Does social media impact on body image?


How social media affects the way we see ourselves

Can pregnant women ever drink?


Can pregnant women ever safely drink alcohol?

Man walks again after transplant


A paralysed man becomes the first in the world to walk again following a pioneering therapy which involved transplanting cells from his nose into his severed spinal cord.

Nigeria declared free of Ebola


The World Health Organization declares Nigeria officially free of Ebola - hailing it a "spectacular success story" - after six weeks with no new cases.

Scans reveal cause of winter blues


Scientists say they have identified the underlying reason why some people are prone to the winter blues, or seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

Ebola-hit nations get key supplies


Vital supplies to tackle Ebola are beginning to arrive in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone - the worst-hit countries, Ghana's president says.

Ebola nurse Pooley back in Africa


William Pooley, the British nurse who contracted Ebola while volunteering in West Africa, returns to Sierra Leone to work at a hospital.

Sugary drinks warning posters 'work'


Signs warning shoppers how much exercise they need to do to burn off the sugar in fizzy drinks could be a useful tool in the fight against obesity, research suggests.

Awareness signs in vegetative patients


Scientists have found hidden signatures in the brains of people in a vegetative state which suggest they might be conscious.

All nations 'have a stake' in Ebola


Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf says all nations have a stake in the fight against Ebola, which "respects no borders".

Sierra Leone revamps Ebola response


Sierra Leone's president announces a shake-up of the body in charge of fighting Ebola in the country, putting the defence ministry in charge.

Canada to ship Ebola vaccine to WHO


Canada is to ship 800 vials of an experimental Ebola vaccine it has developed for further trials with the World Health Organization.

Gamblers' brains 'no endorphin rush'


The feeling of euphoria, or high, created by addictive behaviour is less obvious in the brains of problem gamblers, research suggests.

UK tops WHO gullet cancer table


The UK has the highest rate in the world of one of the two main types of gullet cancer, according to the World Health Organization.

New ovarian cancer test developed


A new test has been developed that could help doctors identify ovarian cancer more accurately and cut down on instances of unnecessary surgery.

Ebola screening begins at Heathrow


Passengers arriving at Heathrow airport from Ebola-affected countries have been screened by health officials for symptoms of the virus.

Fly genes hold clue to human illness


Scientists sequence the entire genome of the common housefly in a bid to find cures for human diseases.

Woman finds three-inch leech in nose


A backpacker finds a leech which had been living in her nose for a month after returning from a trip to South East Asia.

Ebola: Why is it this disease we fear?


Why does Ebola cause more concern than other diseases?

Suspended between life and death


The wards full of patients suspended between life and death

VIDEO: Nigeria's 'hero doctor' who spotted Ebola


The WHO is expected to declare Nigeria free from Ebola on Monday with no reported cases of the virus for six weeks due to a rapid and thorough response from healthcare professionals.

VIDEO: Surfing to fight depression


Grant Trebilco started Fluro Fridays on Australia's Bondi Beach to help fight his own bipolar disorder - now more than 100 surfers join him each week.

VIDEO: Ebola survivors’ blood 'saving lives'


Blood from survivors of the Ebola virus is being used to treat patients suffering from the disease.

VIDEO: Mobile screens to help the short sighted


Scientists at MIT are working on trying to create "superhuman vision".

VIDEO: The quest for an Ebola vaccine


Authorities in West Africa are struggling to deal with the Ebola outbreak which has already claimed thousands of lives in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea.

VIDEO: Obama: 'Don't give in to hysteria'


President Obama has told Americans there must not be hysteria in response to the Ebola outbreak.

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