Health News
10/23/2014

Ebola riot in S. Leone kills two as WHO to launch vaccine trials


Volunteers arrive to pick up bodies of people who died of the Ebola virus in Freetown, Sierra Leone on October 8, 2014Freetown (AFP) - Tensions surrounding the Ebola epidemic raging in west Africa sparked a deadly riot in Sierra Leone as the World Health Organization prepared Wednesday to coordinate clinical trials of an experimental vaccine against the killer virus.



U.S. CDC announces new Ebola monitoring steps for travelers


A Moroccan health worker uses a thermometer to screen a passenger(Reuters) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Wednesday announced new measures to monitor for Ebola anyone entering the United States from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea for a 21-day period. Under the measures starting Monday, travelers from the three West African countries will be expected to check in with health officials every day and report their temperatures and any Ebola symptoms through the 21-day period, the CDC said. (Reporting by Bill Berkrot; Editing by Grant McCool)



Silent Partners, Silent Killers


Silent Partners, Silent KillersLet me introduce you to the S partners. They hang out a lot together and are known for causing excitement, a feeling of euphoria, elevated blood pressure and even pandamonium at times. They can be sneaky, sinister, silent and even quite serious. Let me introduce you to stress, sugar and salt.Yes, they like to partner up quite a lot. Stress has...



Wisconsin judge orders competency hearing for girl in 'Slenderman' case


By Brendan O'Brien MILWAUKEE (Reuters) - A judge on Wednesday ordered a competency hearing for one of two Wisconsin pre-teen girls accused of stabbing a friend in an attempt to please the fictional Internet character "Slenderman." A Wisconsin Forensic Unit psychiatrist had already concluded that Anissa Weier was competent to stand trial, according to the results of mental evaluations disclosed in Waukesha County Circuit Court on Wednesday. ...

Watch: Paralyzed Man Walks After Cell Transplant


Surgeons in Poland transplanted cells from Darek Fidyka's nasal cavity into his spinal cord.

AP-GfK Poll: Many doubt hospitals can handle Ebola


Senior Airman Laura Quick places a mask over her face on Wednesday Oct. 22, 2014, during an infectious disease training exercise for the Ebola virus on Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. Medical specialists on base perform the exercise with a different disease each year. (AP Photo/Northwest Florida Daily News, Nick Tomecek)WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans have some confidence that the U.S. health care system will prevent Ebola from spreading in this country, but they're not so sure their local hospital can safely handle a patient, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll.



Nestle keeps West Africa plants open, ready to act if Ebola spreads: CEO


Nestle CEO Paul Bulcke talks to Reuters during the inauguration of a dairy plant in Lagos de MorenoBy David Alire Garcia LAGOS DE MORENO Mexico (Reuters) - Nestle has no plans to close any of its eight factories or curb output in cocoa and coffee-rich West and Central Africa because of Ebola, but is ready to adapt if it spreads, the Chief Executive of the world's largest food company said on Wednesday. Nestle's factories in the region including both Ghana and Ivory Coast produce chocolate beverages, instant coffee, powdered milk, cereals and bottled water, but the company has yet to suffer any supply or transport disruptions due to Ebola in nearby Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. ...



Panama bars travelers from three Ebola-hit African countries


PANAMA CITY (Reuters) - Panama has banned entry of travelers from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, the three West African nations worst hit by the Ebola virus, the health ministry said on Wednesday. The ban applies to anyone traveling from the three countries or people entering Panama who had been there during the last 21 days, the ministry said in a statement. Panama is a major hub for travel and commerce in Latin America and has so far not registered any cases of Ebola. The travel ban would be maintained until the three countries were declared free of the virus, the government said. ...

Congo doctor Denis Mukwege wins Europe's top human rights prize


By Magdalena Mis LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - A Nobel-prize nominated Congolese gynaecologist who survived an attempt on his life in 2012 has won the European Parliament's Sakharov Prize for helping victims of sexual violence in his country. The award, announced late on Tuesday, comes with a 50,000 euro ($63,000) cash prize, which award winner Denis Mukwege will collect in Strasbourg next month. "The Sakharov Prize is a strong signal, telling the women they have not been abandoned to a barbaric fate. It tells them that the world listens to them," Mukwege said in a statement. ...

Peace declared between Platini, Hayatou


Platini talks with Blatter and Hayatou during the 62nd FIFA Congress in BudapestBy Brian Homewood BERNE (Reuters) - Peace has been declared between UEFA president Michel Platini and his African counterpart Issa Hayatou after the Frenchman reacted angrily to suggestions that he had interfered in the affairs of the Confederation of African Football (CAF). CAF claimed in a statement on Tuesday that Platini had suggested calling off the African Nations Cup, due to be played in Morocco in January and told him to stay out of their business. ...



Official WHO Ebola toll near 5,000 with true number nearer 15,000


Health workers remove the body of Prince Nyentee, a man whom local residents said died of Ebola virus in MonroviaBy Tom Miles GENEVA (Reuters) - At least 4,877 people have died in the world's worst recorded outbreak of Ebola, and at least 9,936 cases of the disease had been recorded as of Oct. 19, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Wednesday, but the true toll may be three times as much. The WHO has said real numbers of cases are believed to be much higher than reported: by a factor of 1.5 in Guinea, 2 in Sierra Leone and 2.5 in Liberia, while the death rate is thought to be about 70 percent of all cases. That would suggest a toll of almost 15,000. ...



Novartis reports positive results in spinal inflammation condition


ZURICH (Reuters) - Swiss drugmaker Novartis said on Thursday two late-stage trials showed its drug secukinumab improved symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis, a debilitating joint condition of the spine. The trials, which involved a total of approximately 600 patients, found Novartis' drug improved signs and symptoms of the disease as well as physical function and quality of life compared with placebo. The results follow on from positive findings for the anti-inflammation drug in a type of arthritis associated with the skin disease psoriasis last month. ...

Ebola sleuths scour DR Congo jungle for source of outbreak


Doctors Without Borders (MSF) medical workers treat an Ebola patient in an isolation ward in Kampungu, Democratic Republic of Congo in 2007Medical sleuths are deep in the jungle of the DR Congo trying to track down the origins of the latest Ebola outbreak in the country. "When (the pigs) were dying we were eating them without knowing that we shouldn't," Iloko said.



US to track everyone coming from Ebola nations


This undated handout photo provided by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) shows a kit that travelers from Ebola-stricken West African nations will be given containing information cards and a thermometer and they will be required to make daily check-ins with state or local health officials to report their status. CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said the check-ins could be in person, by telephone, Skype or Facetime or through employers — CDC was consulting with the state and local officials to help them work that out. (AP Photo/CDC)ATLANTA (AP) — All travelers who come into the U.S. from three Ebola-stricken West African nations will now be monitored for three weeks, the latest step by federal officials to keep the disease from spreading into the country.



Obama expresses optimism about Ebola in US


President Barack Obama speaks to the media about the government’s Ebola response, in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama expressed confidence Wednesday about the ability to contain Ebola in the U.S., taking special note of the ongoing recovery of two nurses who contracted the disease and of others who were declared Ebola free after being exposed to the deadly virus.



Man Pleads Guilty After Faking 2 Year Coma to Avoid Court


A man plead guilty this week after allegedly stealing 40,000 pounds from an elderly neighbor and pretending to be in a coma for two years to avoid charges.

Being a Couch Potato Could Harm You in Ways You Don't Even Know


Being a Couch Potato Could Harm You in Ways You Don't Even KnowIs your sofa bad for your health? A host of scientists and advocacy groups say the answer may be yes -- and some government officials may slowly be agreeing with them. The problem lies with fire-retardant chemicals in foam sofa cushions. In the 1970s concerns over house fires, some sparked by lit cigarettes on furniture, prompted a move to...



Key features of rigorous new US Ebola monitoring


This undated handout photo provided by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) shows a kit that travelers from Ebola-stricken West African nations will be given containing information cards and a thermometer and they will be required to make daily check-ins with state or local health officials to report their status. CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said the check-ins could be in person, by telephone, Skype or Facetime or through employers — CDC was consulting with the state and local officials to help them work that out. (AP Photo/CDC)CHICAGO (AP) — Rigorous monitoring of travelers arriving from Ebola-stricken West African countries is being implemented to keep the virus from spreading in the United States.



Physicians on the Front Lines: Where Technology Can Help to Make the Clean Hand the Winning Hand


Whether in a personal or professional setting, very few of us find ourselves wanting to be apart from our smart phones. They keep us connected to just about everything these days. In healthcare, electronic devices are permeating both the hospital and consumer/patient settings with everything from electronic health records to wearable devices...

Doctors Combat 'Ebolaphobia' With Facts as Antidote to Fear


ABC News' Dr. Richard Besser moderated a Twitter chat on Ebola.

Dozens released Ebola-free from Sierra Leone site


CAPTON CORRECTS THE DATE In this grab from video provided by Associated Press Television on Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, Ebola survivors Hawanatu Turay, left and an unidentified woman, display their certificates, after being given the all clear, at a treatment centre at Hastings, near Freetown, Sierra Leone. Dozens of Ebola survivors were discharged from a treatment center near Sierra Leone's capital on Wednesday and told they were virus-free. The third group released from the Hastings Treatment center, which included 45 patients, were also issued with health certificates they proudly held up. (AP Photo/Associated Press Television)FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — Dozens of Ebola survivors have been discharged from a treatment center near Sierra Leone's capital and told they were virus-free, as police and residents clashed in other areas of the West African country.



Florida governor's race a dead heat, poll shows


Former Florida Governor Charlie Crist and Florida Governor Rick Scott take part in a gubernatorial debateBy Bill Cotterell TALLAHASSEE Fla. (Reuters) - Florida Governor Rick Scott and his challenger for re-election, former Governor Charlie Crist, are locked in a dead heat in their race to run the nation's largest swing state, poll results released on Wednesday show. The Quinnipiac University Poll results show Scott, a Republican, and Crist, a former Republican running as a Democrat, each with 42 percent support, with both candidates struggling with low popularity. "Mr. Crist and Mr. ...



Ebola survivors in Liberia are symbols of hope and help


Four survivors of the Ebola outbreak walk at a clinic outside MonroviaBy Misha Hussain DAKAR (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Ebola survivors in Liberia are quickly becoming an important part of the fight against the deadly virus that has killed more than 4,500 people in West Africa since being detected in the region in March. Once rejected by their communities, survivors are now being seen as part of the solution as scientists try to find a way to use the antibodies in their blood to help treat victims. ...



Biogen's Tecfidera sales miss estimates; confirms first PML case


A pedestrian passes the sign outside the headquarters of Biogen Idec Inc. in CambridgeBy Bill Berkrot (Reuters) - Biogen Idec Inc said on Wednesday sales of its big-selling new multiple sclerosis drug Tecfidera fell short of Wall Street's lofty expectations, and the company confirmed a serious brain infection in a patient who took the oral medication, sending its shares 7 percent lower. Biogen reported the first case of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in a Tecfidera patient, who had been part of a clinical trial and was taking the drug for 4-1/2 years. ...



WHO: Ebola responsible for 4,877 deaths


LONDON (AP) — Ebola is now believed to have killed 4,877 people globally and that the spread of the lethal virus remains "persistent and widespread" in West Africa, the World Health Organization said Wednesday.

Cuban doctors, nurses land in Liberia to fight Ebola alongside U.S.


By James Harding Giahyue MONROVIA (Reuters) - A team of Cuban doctors and nurses arrived in Liberia on Wednesday to help to fight the worst outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus on record alongside a U.S. military mission deploying in the West Africa country. A jet from the national airline Cubana carrying the 51 medical personnel touched down at 6.45 a.m. EDT at the Roberts International Airport outside Monrovia, a stone's throw from a new Ebola clinic built by U.S. forces. The doctors and nurses, dressed in white uniforms, disembarked from the aircraft waving Cuban flags. ...

Drugmakers to join forces to make millions of Ebola vaccine doses


bigA nurse writes name of voluteer on protective suit during Red Cross training excercise in WuerzburgBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - Leading drugmakers plan to work together to speed up the development of an Ebola vaccine and hope to produce millions of doses for use next year. U.S. firm Johnson & Johnson said on Wednesday that it aims to produce at least 1 million doses of its two-step vaccine next year and has already discussed collaboration with Britain's GlaxoSmithKline, which is working on a rival vaccine. ...



CDC to Monitor Travelers From Ebola-Hit Nations for 21 Days


All travelers to Ebola-affected countries to undergo 21-day monitoring.

Ebola becomes a workplace concern


New Ebola gear guidelines: head-to-toe coverageEmployers face thorny issues when trying to figure out how to deal with the deadly virus.



U.S. tightens Ebola monitoring for West African visitors


Registered nurse Keene Roadman, stands fully dressed in personal protective equipmentBy Bill Berkrot NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. health officials unveiled new measures on Wednesday to carry out Ebola monitoring on anyone entering the country from the three nations at the center of a West African epidemic, increasing precautions to stop the spread of the virus. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said that beginning Monday, travelers from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea will be directed to check in with health officials every day and report their temperatures and any Ebola symptoms for 21 days, the period of incubation for the virus. ...



Dog of Ebola-infected Texas nurse tests negative for virus


DALLAS (Reuters) - The 1-year-old King Charles Spaniel belonging to a Dallas nurse infected with Ebola has tested free of the virus and will remain in isolation for the remainder of his 21-day monitoring period, the city of Dallas said on Wednesday. "Bentley is doing great! Turns out he likes butt rubs," Dallas spokeswoman Sana Syed wrote in a recent Tweet about the dog belonging to nurse Nina Pham, who is in good condition at a National Institutes of Health hospital in Maryland. ...

As virus spreads, insurers exclude Ebola from new policies


By Carolyn Cohn, Richa Naidu and Avik Das (Reuters) - As fear of Ebola infections spreads to developed economies, U.S. and British insurance companies have begun writing Ebola exclusions into standard policies to cover hospitals, event organizers and other businesses vulnerable to local disruptions. As a result, new policies and renewals will become costlier for companies opting to insure business travel to West Africa or to cover the risk of losses from quarantine shutdowns at home, industry officials told Reuters. ...

EU, in change of tack, keeps medicines filed under health


LONDON (Reuters) - New European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, in a change of tack, has decided to keep responsibility for medicines in the Commission's division for health, rather than switching it to its industry unit. The supervision of medicines is a hot topic in Europe, following a series of rows over access to clinical trial data, and the original plan to move it from the directorate general (DG) for Health and Consumers to the DG for Enterprise and Industry triggered protests. ...

CDC: Monitoring for all coming from Ebola nations


WASHINGTON (AP) — Significantly expanding their vigilance, federal health officials said Wednesday that they would begin monitoring all travelers — even Americans — who come to the U.S. from Ebola-stricken West African nations for 21 days.

GSK eyes prime FTSE 100 slot for standalone HIV drugs business


A no entry sign is pictured outside the GlaxoSmithKline building in Hounslow, west LondonBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - GlaxoSmithKline , battered by weak U.S. drug sales and a bribery scandal in China, is looking to float its fast-growing HIV drugs business as part of a recovery plan that includes a fresh round of cost cutting. As a standalone company ViiV Healthcare would be among the top 40 companies in London's FTSE 100 index, outranking such household names as retailer Marks and Spencer , GSK Chief Executive Andrew Witty told reporters. Analysts at Jefferies said they valued the HIV and AIDS division at about 17 billion pounds ($27 billion). ...



Drugmakers may need indemnity for fast-tracked Ebola vaccines


A medical staff holds a package of an experimental candidate vaccine rVSV-ZEBOV against Ebola virus disease at the University hospital in GenevaBy Ben Hirschler and Stephanie Nebehay LONDON/GENEVA (Reuters) - Drugmakers are looking for some kind of indemnity from governments or multilateral agencies against possible losses or claims arising from the widespread emergency use of new Ebola vaccines in Africa. While the issue will not delay the industry's ongoing work to accelerate production and clinical testing of three experimental vaccines, it is likely to be discussed at a high-level meeting in Geneva on Thursday. ...



Watch: Sweet Dreams


Having trouble sleeping? ABC's Tech Contributor Tina Trinh tries out the newest technology that could help you get a better night's sleep.

Corporations, advocacy groups spend big on ballot measures


Corporations and national advocacy groups are throwing big dollars behind TV ads before voters decide 158 state ballot measures.

North Korea to bar foreign tourists over Ebola concerns: tour operators


By James Pearson SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korea will bar entry to foreigners on tourist trips from Friday, because of worries over the spread of the deadly Ebola virus, operators of tours to the isolated country told Reuters. At least 4,877 people have died in the world's worst recorded outbreak of Ebola, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, with nearly 10,000 cases recorded by Oct. 19, though the true toll could be three times as much. It was not immediately clear if the North Korean ban also covered non-tourist members of the diplomatic or business community with ties to Pyongyang. ...

Extra powers to tackle deadly bat virus in Australia


A file photo shows a grey-headed Flying-fox (Pteropus poliocephalus), a native Australian bat. Three flying foxes were found to be carrying a deadly virusAn Australian state is set to unveil tougher measures to tackle bats after three flying foxes were found to be carrying the deadly lyssavirus, officials said Thursday. The New South Wales government fears transmission of the potentially fatal Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV) to humans and the state's health department has issued a warning to residents not to approach the bats. "So far this year we have had three people who were bitten or scratched by bats that were later confirmed to have had the potentially deadly lyssavirus," NSW Health's communicable diseases director Vicky Sheppeard said in a statement. The last victim was eight-year-old Lincoln Flynn, who died in early 2013 after being scratched by a bat in Queensland the previous November.



The 7 best strength exercises


Every exercise in your strength program has a purpose -- to help you build strength and muscle, burn fat, and improve your fitness. While there's a time and a place for nearly any exercise under the right circumstance, some movements are simply more effective than others. And it should be no surprise that the ones that build a foundation for skills that you'll use in real life will be the most beneficial for improving your fitness and quality of life.

Reduce your risk of dementia


The statistics, unfortunately, are staggering. An estimated 44 million people worldwide are living with dementia, according to a report released Tuesday by Alzheimer's Disease International.

Hallucinogens to treat depression?


Psychedelic drugs are being researched as a potential treatment for conditions ranging from anxiety to tobacco and alcohol addiction.

Lack of sleep may shrink your brain


Can sleep deprivation affect the size of your brain? It's possible, a recent study published in an online issue of Neurology suggests.

Mental illness: Time to break taboo


350 million people around the world suffer from depression. Why aren't we talking about it?

Schizophrenia is eight disorders


What we know -- and psychiatrists have diagnosed for decades -- as schizophrenia may really be eight separate diseases, research published in The American Journal of Psychiatry suggests.

Adam's story: 63 pills a day


The modest clinic on Milpas Street in laid-back Santa Barbara, California, was well known to patients seeking powerful pain medication.

How outbreak can start, and end


Dr. Sanjay Gupta describes how "contact tracing" could help stem the tide of an Ebola outbreak.

The healthiest fish to eat?


As our oceans become more polluted, Sally Kohn sits down with Fabien Cousteau to talk about the healthiest fish to eat.

Plastic surgery gone wrong


Dr. Terry Dubrow and Dr. Paul Nassif from E!'s new show "Botched" discuss the risks and complications of plastic surgery.

Ha! Laughter is the best medicine


Scott Weems, author of "Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why," speaks with CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

Twin boys born 24 days apart


Due to a delayed delivery, a set of twins in Massachusetts were born 24 days apart. WCVB's Mary Saladna reports.

Is red meat really bad for you?


CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks with Nina Teicholz, author of "The Big Fat Surprise."

This is your body on weed


Dr. Sanjay Gupta explains how marijuana affects the brain and how pot can be used to treat certain conditions.

Teacher eats only McDonald's


A teacher only eats McDonald's for 90 days, and LOSES 37 pounds. KCCI reports.

World's most dangerous workout?


Is the "sport of fitness" the world's most dangerous workout? CNN's Jarrett Bellini asks CrossFitters and gives it a go.

Curable disease killed 1.5 million in 2013


A World Health Organization report on tuberculosis shows that 9 million people developed the disease in 2013 and 1.5 million died, making it one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases.

That sweet drink may age you


Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages may make certain cells in your body age faster, a new study suggests.

See King Tut's 'virtual autopsy'


King Tutankhamun's golden, mummified remains tell only a partial story of an ancient Egyptian boy king who died under mysterious circumstances.

What the dying really regret


There are many regrets patients share with this chaplain before they die; those about time wasted hating their bodies are saddest.

That sweet drink may age you


Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages may make certain cells in your body age faster, a new study suggests.

The 5 biggest breakfast myths


The first meal of the day can have a very different meaning for different people.

New hope for paralysis cure


A man paralyzed after his spinal cord was severed is walking again after a transplant using cells from his nasal cavity.

A one-woman Ebola hospital


22-year-old Fatu Kekula nursed her mother, father and sister through Ebola using trash bags to protect herself.

Crab's blood could save your life


Hundreds of thousands of horseshoe crabs are captured each year for their incredible blue blood.

The monster that took my son


A week before Cole died, I promised him he would do "something big" someday. For two years, I have been fighting to keep that promise.

Mandy Moore: For Africa, health care that works


Mandy Moore says quality health care can be ensured by applying commercial franchising strategies to clinics in Africa.

Study: 3 a month will fly with Ebola


Up to three Ebola-infected travelers might board an international flight each month in West Africa, researchers say.

Tests show Spanish nurse's aide free of Ebola


The Spanish nurse's aide who contracted Ebola after treating virus-stricken patients in Madrid is free of the virus, her doctors announced Tuesday after another test on her.

The 5 biggest breakfast myths


The first meal of the day can have a very different meaning for different people.

Why should it cost money to donate an organ?


Sigrid Fry-Revere says the National Organ Transplant Act has caused more Americans to die waiting for an organ than died in both World Wars, Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq

Egg-freezing a better deal for companies


Rene Almeling, Joanna Radin and Sarah S. Richardson say Apple and Facebook offering coverage for their female employees to freeze their eggs sidesteps the issue of long hours and work-life balance.

6 health benefits of pumpkins


When you think about pumpkins, what comes to mind? Jack-o'-lanterns? Pumpkin pie? Charlie Brown? Pumpkin spice lattes?

Technique offers hope for paralysis cure


A man paralyzed after his spinal cord was severed is walking again after a transplant using cells from his nasal cavity.

I'd have to do how much exercise to eat that?


By early next year, more than 20 chain restaurants will be posting calorie counts on their menus. Yet that information may not be enough to change consumers' behavior, researchers say.

5 healthy Halloween treats


We love Halloween season. Sweets. Sweaters. Sipping hot cider (maybe spiked). Halloween can certainly get you in the spirit, and nothing warms our hearts like these healthy Halloween treats that help you stay energized instead of stuck in a sugar coma.

15 best superfoods for fall


Fall superfoods are the perfect excuse to get cooking on cool nights. See fall superfood pictures to get started!

50 pounds lost for 50th reunion


In January, Carol Highsmith, 68, began a journey of threes. She had three milestones of 50 that she planned to reach by following three simple rules:

How rabbi lost 100 pounds


Rabbi Pesach Sommer lost 100 pounds after a doctor told him he had type 2 diabetes.

It's time to get your flu shot!


Flu season is about to begin, the CDC says. And health officials have a few updates to their recommendations.

Flu shot myths addressed


Flu vaccine myths can confuse people trying to decide whether to get a shot. Here are five common myths and, based on information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the truth.

Vintage cold and flu ads



New link between coffee and DNA


You can blame that third cup of Joe on your genes.

Beer may be good for your brain


An element in beer may be good for your brain and other things we learned from medical journals this week.

Migraines linked to Parkinson's


People who suffer from migraines with aura during middle age have double the risk of developing Parkinson's disease or other movement disorders later in life than those who do not, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Neurology.

Music helps your brain


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us why music therapy is good for the brain and how it can help us live to 100.

Live to 100: Laugh more


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us how laughing more can help us live to 100.

Eat chocolate. Yes, chocolate.


Dr. Sanjay Gupta tell us how eating certain types of chocolate can help us live to 100.

Visit to Sanjay Gupta's past


Dr. Sanjay Gupta traveled from Pakistan to Michigan to discover his family's roots. Here's what he learned along the way.

How to really lose weight


From what to eat to how much to exercise, Elizabeth Cohen explains what you really need to do to lose weight.

Keeping young athletes safe


CNN's Holly Firfer reports on ways parents can keep their student athletes safe.

Lab holds 2,000 brains


The University of Miami Brain Endowment Bank provides brain tissues to researchers to study various brain disorders.

Smart toothbrush tracks brushing


This Bluetooth enabled toothbrush coaches you while you brush and tracks your progress through a smartphone app.

Farming in the city


This urban farm supplies fresh produce to food deserts, but also offers other benefits to individuals and the community.

Can psychedelic drugs be medicine?


Psychiatrists are now considering the benefits of LSD and other psychedelic drugs in treatment. Dr. Sanjay Gupta reports.

What is 'too much' caffeine?


Carl Azuz reports on why consuming too much caffeine is not good for you.

Inside your mind with 'Brain Games'


Jason Silva from National Geographic's hit show "Brain Games" talks about tricks the mind plays that shape our reality.

The best way to brush


CNN's Martha Shade reports on what's the best way to brush your teeth.

VIDEO: Nigeria's 'hero doctor' who spotted Ebola


The WHO is expected to declare Nigeria free from Ebola on Monday with no reported cases of the virus for six weeks due to a rapid and thorough response from healthcare professionals.

VIDEO: Bondi Beach surfers fight depression


Grant Trebilco started Fluro Fridays on Australia's Bondi Beach to help fight his own bipolar disorder - now more than 100 surfers join him each week.

VIDEO: Ebola survivors’ blood 'saving lives'


Blood from survivors of the Ebola virus is being used to treat patients suffering from the disease.

VIDEO: Mobile screens to help the short sighted


Scientists at MIT are working on trying to create "superhuman vision".

VIDEO: The quest for an Ebola vaccine


Authorities in West Africa are struggling to deal with the Ebola outbreak which has already claimed thousands of lives in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea.

VIDEO: Obama: 'Don't give in to hysteria'


President Obama has told Americans there must not be hysteria in response to the Ebola outbreak.

VIDEO: Ebola vaccine 'will come too late'


UK pharmaceuticals firm GlaxoSmithKline says its Ebola vaccine will not be ready until late 2015 and is "going to come too late" for this epidemic.

Six surprising Ebola numbers


Six surprising figures from the frontline

To walk again - the people behind the story


The project that enabled a paralysed man to walk again

Ebola: WHO under fire over response to epidemic


Global health body under fire over Ebola

Ebola crisis: How Nigeria's Dr Adadevoh fought the virus


How one doctor saved Nigeria from a catastrophe

Nigeria fights back against Ebola


Nigeria's lesson in how to prevent an outbreak

Ebola: How many people have died?


Why we don't know how many people Ebola has killed

Ebola treatments - how far off?


How soon could there be an off-the-shelf treatment and vaccine?

Why in a single year did life expectancy in the US drop by 12 years?


Why did life expectancy in the US drop by 12 years after WW1

Radio to the rescue: many saved


How broadcasting health messages can save lives

'Sadness and desperation - resilience and bravery'


BBC reporter learns of sad news that a suspected Ebola patient has died

How not to catch Ebola


As the outbreak rages, here's what we know about stopping it

WHO crisis team holds Ebola talks


The World Health Organization's emergency committee holds talks on travel restrictions and screening measures on the Ebola outbreak.

'Nine million have TB' - WHO report


The World Health Organization revises its estimate as to how many people have tuberculosis up by 500,000, in its latest report into the killer disease.

Male genes linked to early death


The male Y sex chromosome may have a role in prolonging men's lives and fighting cancer, according to a study.

Man walks again after transplant


A paralysed man becomes the first in the world to walk again following a pioneering therapy which involved transplanting cells from his nose into his severed spinal cord.

Scans reveal cause of winter blues


Scientists say they have identified the underlying reason why some people are prone to the winter blues, or seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

Nigeria declared free of Ebola


The World Health Organization declares Nigeria officially free of Ebola - hailing it a "spectacular success story" - after six weeks with no new cases.

Ebola-hit nations get key supplies


Vital supplies to tackle Ebola are beginning to arrive in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone - the worst-hit countries, Ghana's president says.

Ebola nurse Pooley back in Africa


William Pooley, the British nurse who contracted Ebola while volunteering in West Africa, returns to Sierra Leone to work at a hospital.

Sugary drinks warning posters 'work'


Signs warning shoppers how much exercise they need to do to burn off the sugar in fizzy drinks could be a useful tool in the fight against obesity, research suggests.

Awareness signs in vegetative patients


Scientists have found hidden signatures in the brains of people in a vegetative state which suggest they might be conscious.

All nations 'have a stake' in Ebola


Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf says all nations have a stake in the fight against Ebola, which "respects no borders".

Sierra Leone revamps Ebola response


Sierra Leone's president announces a shake-up of the body in charge of fighting Ebola in the country, putting the defence ministry in charge.

Canada to ship Ebola vaccine to WHO


Canada is to ship 800 vials of an experimental Ebola vaccine it has developed for further trials with the World Health Organization.

Fly genes hold clue to human illness


Scientists sequence the entire genome of the common housefly in a bid to find cures for human diseases.

Woman finds three-inch leech in nose


A backpacker finds a leech which had been living in her nose for a month after returning from a trip to South East Asia.

Ebola: Why is it this disease we fear?


Why does Ebola cause more concern than other diseases?

Suspended between life and death


The wards full of patients suspended between life and death

VIDEO: In numbers: Treating Ebola patients


BBC News looks at what it takes to treat Ebola patients, in numbers and graphics.

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